64 days ago

#PlasticFreeJuly "The Rubbish Trip" Reduce Household Rubbish

Barbara from Kerikeri District

As part of Plastic Free July Aotearoa, Plastic Free Kerikeri, Redwoods Cafe, Riverview School and Transition Towns Bay of Islands are pleased to host The Rubbish Trip's popular presentation on zero waste living in Kerikeri, followed by a short, facilitated opportunity to set your own zero waste challenges to take you beyond Plastic Free July!

Join Hannah and Liam, the Two No-Waste Nomads behind The Rubbish Trip, for an introduction to the practicalities and philosophy of waste reduction. Drawing on their own research and over four years of experience living zero waste, Hannah and Liam will guide you through the whys and the hows of life without a rubbish bin, including:

- What is the zero waste movement? Why is waste reduction important?

- How zero waste principles can revolutionise your perspectives on living and lifestyle, beyond your rubbish bin.

- Innovative examples of waste minimisation policy, practice and thinking from around the globe, and how these might inform community-level waste reduction.

- Tips for how you can reduce the rubbish in your life (including fun DIY household products, cosmetics, and other life hacks).

This event is free; everyone is welcome. Free zero waste nibbles will be provided - BYO reusable cup for a hot drink if you'd like one!

After the talk, stay on for a few extra minutes to set your own zero waste challenges for both you and Kerikeri :-)

The Rubbish Trip will be running a series of FREE events throughout the Far North from mid-July to the end of August. Check our Facebook event listings for more info! If you'd like us to come and run an event in your Far North community, please get in touch!

This talk is part of The Rubbish Trip's travelling project, taking the zero waste message around Aotearoa New Zealand.

Feel free to contact us via facebook #plasticfreekerikeri
or the organiser Barbara Belger 021 149 8656

More messages from your neighbours
4 hours ago

Thank you Wattie's

Julia de Ruiter from The Salvation Army NZ

We want to say a heartfelt thank you to Wattie’s NZ and the 150 schools who took part in this year's Cans for Good campaign. Thanks to the incredible effort of students, teachers and whānau, over 30,000 cans were collected and will make a huge difference to Salvation Army foodbanks around Aotearoa.

Wattie’s generously donated a further 25,000 cans taking the total number collected to over 56,000 cans.

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13 hours ago

Poll: Did you enjoy the giant Big Fresh fruits and veges?

The team Reporter from Whangarei Leader

People either loved them or hated them, and now they're up for sale.

The giant 1990's Big Fresh Supermarket fruits and veges are up on Trade Me, with over 700 people adding them to their watchlist.

Did you enjoy seeing them on your grocery shopping outing?

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13 hours ago

Time To Stash Your Cash Folks?

Geoff from Russell

Time To Stash Your Cash Folks?

A while ago, I wrote a piece somewhere titled “Stash Your Cash.” I decided, in view of receiving this www.youtube.com... today from a very good friend, that it might be time to revisit the idea. Before doing so, the guy goes on about “banks printing money.” Banks do NOT print money these days, they simply tap a few computer keys and create DEBT out of thin air. When you see tv news clips of printing presses churning out masses of bank notes, it is all distrsction and disinformation. If you got to www.rbnz.govt.nz... you will see that there is a grand total of NZ$6,523,841,000.00 in notes and coins in circulation. Go here www.rbnz.govt.nz... and you will see how much money is in the banks. NZ$318,977,000,000.00. Think about this. When you put money into an account, you are supposed to be able to withdraw it in cash (legal tender) if there is only NZ$6,523,841,000.00 in cash in existance,how would folks get paid if they all wanted their money at the same time for whatever reason? Here are a couple of other questions (1) What does the bank do with the money that you put into the account (2)Does the money in the account remain your money or does it become the bank's money?

OK, back to the video www.youtube.com... At the 7 minute mark he talks about visiting a pension, listen carefully. The pension fund was going to sell negative yielding bonds, take the money in BANK NOTES and put it is a vault. Is there a lesson here? This www.independent.co.uk... is anrticle from way back in September 2016 headlined “Swiss savers are storing cash in boxes in order to tackle negative interest rates” Swiss companies withdrawing cash, storing it and buying insurance because insurance costs less than the negative interest charged by banks! Herefinance.yahoo.com... is another one from just a few weeks ago and how about this www.stuff.co.nz... for one closer to home?

Moving right along, at the 12 minute mark he suggests going to usdebtclock.org... I used to check the NZ Debt clock commodity.com... each day, haven't for while, but did after hearing this. In the debt figure of just under NZ$134 BILLION, there is no reference to Unfunded liabilities and her's why “The debts of state-owned enterprises are not included and neither are obligations for future state and Civil Service pensions, nor the risk of guarantees given to the nations’ bank depositors”. The reference to “bank depositors” is irrelevant at present as the new deposit guruantee wcam has yet to be set up, but what about the “future state and Civil Service pensions,” I wonder if those liabilities have been “funded.”

Where oh where have our gold reserves gone, oh where oh where can they be? Remember the nursery rhyme, “Where oh where has my little dog gone? We might ask the same about New Zealand's gold reserves. The RBNZ told me, in a recent e mail, that the RBNZ has no gold. Interesting. As of 30 August 1961, New Zealand had 986,908.66 ounces of gold which in those days was valued at NZ$35.00 per ounce. On 31 August 1961, the NZ Government “sent “969,023.03 ounces to the IMF and others. That left a balance of 15,885.63 ounces with the RBNZ . I wonder where that went. Think about this, in 1961 , 986,908.66 ounces at US$35.00 per ounce would have been worth US434,471,803.10. Today at US$1,500.00 per ounce it would be worth US$ 1,477,362,990.00 (NZ$2,411,351,872) I wonder if the IMF and others still have what we sent and what happened to the 15,885.63 ounces remaining here, which would be worth US%23,828,445 (NZ$38,892,787.93) Interesting eh?

Might be an interesting story for Rob Stock's weekly “Money Matters” Opinion piece in the Bay Chronicle at least.