72 days ago

Hamilton Civic Choir Concert - Saturday 9th November at 7:30pm

Koli Jayatunge from Hamilton Civic Choir Inc

Bach’s Mass in B Minor to Thrill

Hamilton Civic Choir is excited to be performing Bach’s Mass in B Minor on Saturday 9th November 2019 at the Dr. John Gallagher Academy of Performing Arts in Hamilton.

Joined by local soloists and Civic Players, Hamilton Civic Choir Music Director Timothy Carpenter will bring these forces together for a performance of one of Bach’s finest choral works, full of fervour, contemplation and emotion. The work calls for five soloists which Carpenter has chosen from within the choir itself: Soprano Felicity Tomkins and Mezzo Soprano Cecily Shaw, Contralto Laura Funaki, Tenor Kolitha Jayatunge, and Baritone Aidan Phillips.

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750), the organist, harpsichordist, composer, teacher, and stern Lutheran, is today synonymous with music as much or more than any other name in history. Bach, the towering figure of the Baroque era, who summed up the musical knowledge and techniques that preceded him and developed them further, represented his time more than any other – he was the Baroque period’s (1600-1750) most valid embodiment.

Bach composed one of the supreme achievements in all of music with his epic Mass in B minor. There are few works of music that summarize an entire composer’s career. Bach’s Mass not only is a compendium of his life as a composer, but it is undoubtedly a pillar in all of music and indeed in all of art. It is fitting that Bach’s Mass serves as the culmination of his entire career as it is a combination and compilation of his music spread over two decades.

“Bach’s final crowning achievement, the Mass in B Minor, is considered by many as the greatest composition in Western classical music,” explains Timothy Carpenter. “Although completed in 1749, the work was never performed in its entirety during the composer's lifetime and did not receive its first full performance until over 100 years later in 1859. Bach’s Mass goes well beyond the scope or use of a sacred ritual; rather it becomes an attempt to explore humankind’s relationship with the mysteries of something greater. Whatever one’s religious beliefs or lack thereof, Bach’s Mass in B Minor is nothing short of a monumental testament to the height of human creativity, intellect, and spirituality. Experience this masterpiece with us.”

Don’t wait any longer to hear it for yourself. Join us for a night with a Baroque master and celebrate chorale artistry at its best in the acoustically superior Gallagher Concert Chamber.

What: J. S. Bach’s Mass in B Minor
Where: Dr. John Gallagher Concert Chamber, Academy of Performing Arts, University of Waikato
When: Saturday, 9th November 2019, 7:30pm
Tickets: $40 adults, $25 concession (including students). From www.iticket.co.nz... Door sales (cash only) – subject to availability

For more information contact secretary@hamiltoncivicchoir.org.nz

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Help with this please. Selling an Angle Grinder, how much?

Rod Neighbourly Lead from Melville

Hope you are all well.
I need some help here please.
My best friend in Auckland has cancer and he is trying to get rid of few things, including this Angle Grinder.
I don't understand about those things and I need help to figure out how much he should ask for it.
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1 day ago

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The Team from Hamilton City Council

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3 days ago

Dog Mauling Update - Council Response

Liz from Glenview

To start at beginning of this story please read www.neighbourly.co.nz...

Following a meeting with the deputy mayor we received response from Hamilton City Council Animal Control Unit saying a press release was planned. The following was released:

Controlling roaming dogs - Hamilton City Council

1:27PM, 10 January 2020

If you see a dog roaming in your neighbourhood - with no owner in sight - contact Hamilton City Council’s Animal Education and Control.

"Roaming dogs are an issue that is often overlooked. Usually people do not report roaming dogs until they have caused a problem," says Animal Education and Control Manager Susan Stanford.

"We encourage people to contact us as soon as they see one. We will track the dog down, pick it up and run the necessary checks, before having it returned to its owner if they can be located," says Ms Stanford.

The reinforcement of this message comes about following reported attacks on three domestic cats last month in Glenview, believed to have been done by two roaming dogs. In the past 12 months, there have been 2223 dogs reported roaming in Hamilton; 526 dogs were impounded, and Animal Control gave advice and education on roaming to 568 dog owners.

"Roaming dogs can pose a threat to themselves and others. A roaming dog may be stolen, injured, poisoned or killed. It could also injure another person or animal. A substantial number of dog attacks reported to the Council involve a roaming incident," says Ms Stanford.

Dogs that roam a lot increase the size of their territory and can become aggressive towards people or animals that encroach on it.

"Ultimately if a dog can get out and wander, it will. Dogs roam because owners provide the opportunity for it to do so - not ensuring gates are closed and secured and/or the fencing is inadequate to contain the dog, some dogs can clear a six-foot fence," says Ms Stanford.

"Is it the responsibility of the owner to keep their dogs contained, registered and microchipped, so if they do get out and are found they can be quickly reunited with their owner," says Ms Stanford.

"Our priority is to limit the number of roaming dogs across the city and we appreciate the assistance of the public to help us do that."

Reporting a roaming dog

If you see a roaming dog, phone Hamilton City Council Animal Education and Control on 07 838 6632 and one of our Animal Education and Control Officers will collect the dog and either return it to its owner or take the dog to the safety of our kennel facility.


Hamilton City Council


R.I.P. Ibanez
You will be forever mourned.