386 days ago

Things that surprise Kiwis returning to NZ

Lorna Thornber Reporter from Stuff Travel

Hi everyone,
I'm working on a travel story for Stuff about the things that have surprised returning Kiwis about New Zealand. If you have recently returned from overseas or know someone who has, it would be great to hear about the things that have stood out for you, for better or for worse. Whether it's to do with the weather, the cost of things, the public transport, the food, the housing, the people or something else entirely, we'd be keen to hear about it. Please remember that your comment may be included in the article, unless you say you don't want it to be. Thank you.

More messages from your neighbours
1 day ago

Who has the best scones in Welligton?

Nicholas Boyack Reporter from Community News

Hi Wellington! This week we're investigating where to buy the best cheese scones in our city and we'd love your help.
Please let us know your recommendations in the comments below - tell us where and why the scones are the best - and our intrepid reporter is going to sample your top five choices. You'll be able to read all about it in this Saturday's Dominion Post.

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5 hours ago

Yvette McCausland-Durie returning to coach Central Pulse

Nicholas Boyack Reporter from Community News

Champion netball coach Yvette McCausland-Durie will be back at the helm of the Central Pulse next year after being confirmed as the replacement for Gail Parata.
McCausland-Durie took the Pulse to four consecutive ANZ Premiership finals and won back-to-back championships before stepping down at the end of the 2020 season as the daily commute from Palmerston North to Wellington took its toll.

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6 hours ago

What is Yarn: What It’s Made From, How You Make It and More

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Wellington (The Wash House)

When researching or reading about different fabrics, you are likely to see the word yarn mentioned a lot. ‘Made from spun yarns’ or ‘with synthetic yarns’ are a couple of examples. But what is yarn? What is spun yarn? Are there other types? What does it all mean, and how much relevance does this bear to your final fabric? That’s what we are here to look at in a little more detail.

What is Yarn?
Yarn is a length of fibres. That’s the simplest way to explain it. It is a continuous length of fibres which are interlocked, and it’s used to produce fabrics, as well as in crocheting, knitting, embroidery and ropemaking.

This means that we can split yarn into two different ‘categories’ of sorts. The thread that is used for embroidery or in sewing machines, as well as yarn (commonly known as balls-of-wool) used in crafts such as knitting or crocheting, are long lengths that are bought as yarns.

The alternative would be a yarn which is then knitted or woven into a fabric. The textile is then bought as fabric, in lengths, rather than the yarn itself being purchased separately. This second description is the one that we will explore further in this post.

What is Yarn Made From?
Yarn can be made from such a variety of different fibres. This includes both natural and synthetic fibres. The most common plant fibre is cotton, however, you can also use other natural fibres such as bamboo. Alongside cotton, the synthetic polyester fibre makes up the two most commonly used fibres. Animal fibres are also often used, such as wool, harvested from sheep, as well as cashmere (harvested from goats) Angora (from rabbits) and silk (from insect larvae).

What is the Difference Between Spun and Filament Yarn?
Spun yarn is made by twisting staple fibres together in either an S or Z twist, to make a single thread. The process of twisting the fibres together into yarn is called spinning and it was one of the first processed to be industrialised. Spun yarns can contain a single type of fibre, or you can spin various types of fibre together to give you a blend.

Filament yarn is made up of filament fibres which are either twisted together or simply grouped together. It can either be composed of one filament, which is called a monofilament, or it could be made of more than one, in which case it would be known as a multifilament. This can be as few as two or three filament fibres, or even up to 50, or more.

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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