35 days ago

Mt Albert Tunnel Entry

The Team from Wellington Water

The final stage of the repair to the Mt Albert tunnel and sludge lines involves repairing the floor of the tunnel. As part of this, on Thursday night a crew will be entering the tunnel to perform a visual inspection.

As the tunnel is an active wastewater pipe, we’ll hold wastewater flows at the pump station while the inspection is carried out. We’re scheduling the entry at night when wastewater flows are at a minimum, thereby maximising the amount of time our crews can spend in the tunnel. The plan is for the crew to spend 40 minutes in the tunnel, while based on normal operations we have capacity at the pump station to hold the wastewater flows for up to an hour. In the very unlikely event that the crew has to spend more than an hour in the tunnel, some screened wastewater may need to be discharged from the pump station into the Cook Strait. All possible steps will be taken to prevent this, however it is important to note that this inbound wastewater is made up of 99% water, and is therefore very different to the dewatered sludge that was transported during the earlier stage of repairs. Generators onsite may create some noise, however there will be no construction undertaken during this entry. We will monitor odour and use misters if necessary.

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1 hour ago

What's On: Meet the Candidates (Hutt South)

Arthur from Waterloo

Each candidate will have 5 minutes to address the meeting, followed by questions and discussion from the floor. The meeting will run for about one and a half hours.
Meet the Candidates (Hutt South)
  • Waiwhetu Uniting Church
6 hours ago

NumberWorks'nWords Arcade

NumberWorks'nWords Lower Hutt

Check out NumberWorks’nWords for a gallery of fun games for practicing and consolidating Maths and English skills. The games help to reinforce the concepts taught in our tutoring sessions and make learning fun!

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6 hours ago

Taita College old boy couldn't find Loch Ness monster, reveals secrets of tuatara instead

Kate Green Reporter from Dominion Post

For the scientist who embarked on a hunt for the Loch Ness monster, and more recently sequenced the genome of the tuatara, his love of science and animals began in the Hutt Valley.

Neil Gemmell graduated Dux of Taita College in 1984, and credited his teachers for instilling a love of science in him.

People probably wouldn’t be surprised to hear he was still chasing answers to this kind of mystery.

“I was a bit of a nerd,” he laughed.

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