Ngaio, Wellington

23 days ago

Slowing down the CBD - what's your view?

Katie Townshend Reporter from Dominion Post

Wellington looks set to reduce speed limits on almost all of the city's CBD streets, and some want the changes to go even further.
The proposed revamp would result in speed limits being reduced to 30kmh on all CBD streets except the waterfront quays and main roads. What do you make of the … View more
Wellington looks set to reduce speed limits on almost all of the city's CBD streets, and some want the changes to go even further.
The proposed revamp would result in speed limits being reduced to 30kmh on all CBD streets except the waterfront quays and main roads. What do you make of the plan?

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21 days ago

OWHIRO BAY UPDATE 5 FEBRUARY

The Team from Wellington Water

Following our removal of the health warning signs in Owhiro Bay, we would like to provide clarification on the condition of the Bay.

These signs were removed as per our protocols for the reopening of the beach. A source of the spike in contamination was identified and the sampling at the long term… View more
Following our removal of the health warning signs in Owhiro Bay, we would like to provide clarification on the condition of the Bay.

These signs were removed as per our protocols for the reopening of the beach. A source of the spike in contamination was identified and the sampling at the long term beach monitoring site had returned to normal.

We acknowledge that our communication could have been better as removing the warning signs implies that the Owhiro Stream, that crosses the beach, is safe for swimming in. Owhiro Stream, like many urban waterways, has a long history of contamination and is regularly unsafe for swimming in. Improving the quality of Owhiro Stream will require a coordinated and long term programme of works.

We have taken immediate action to correct the lack of information, and yesterday placed warning signs at the stream mouth at Owhiro Bay. Our operations team are preparing for continued investigations in the catchment to see if there is another fault or cross-connection that we can find and resolve.

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21 days ago

Te Hono ki Aotearoa: connecting people and navigating a course for the future — film screening

The Team from Alexander Turnbull Library

This event is part of the Pūkana exhibition — a celebration of moments in Māori performance.
In the National Library Gallery

Date: Tuesday, 11 February, 2020
Time: Doors open 5.30pm for 6.00pm start, ends 8:30pm
Cost: Free
Location: Taiwhanga Kahau — Auditorium (lower ground floor), Corner … View more
This event is part of the Pūkana exhibition — a celebration of moments in Māori performance.
In the National Library Gallery

Date: Tuesday, 11 February, 2020
Time: Doors open 5.30pm for 6.00pm start, ends 8:30pm
Cost: Free
Location: Taiwhanga Kahau — Auditorium (lower ground floor), Corner Molesworth and Aitken Streets, Wellington. Entrance on Aitken Street.

Celebrate an extraordinay intercultural partnership
To celebrate the 10 year anniversary of an extraordinary intercultural partnership which culminated in the creation and exchange of the ceremonial waka taua ‘Te Hono ki Aotearoa’ the Dutch Embassy supported by the National Library will screen the film, followed by kōrero and refreshments.

A living connection between Dutch and Māori cultures
‘Te Hono ki Aotearoa’ follows the journey of a waka taua (ceremonial canoe) hewn from a 600-year-old Kauri. The waka taua was ceremonially gifted, on permanent loan, to the Museum Volkenkunde in Leiden, the Netherlands. It is the first and only case in which another culture is entrusted with the custody of a waka.

New Zealand film maker Jan Bieringa created a film, which traces an extraordinary intercultural partnership from the commission, construction and handover of the waka. The waka taua is appropriately named ‘Te Hono ki Aotearoa’, and can be translated to “The Link New Zealand”.

Netherlands Ambassador Mira Woldberg will give the opening remarks of the 10th anniversary of the waka, a living connection between Dutch and Māori cultures.

Panel discussion
Following the film screening is a panel discussion comprising:

•Steven Engelsman, the former Director of the Volkenkunde Museum

•Alex Miesen, member of the Dutch waka crew who look after the waka

•Jan Bieringa, Director of “Te Hono ki Aotearoa”

•Tamahou Temara, Toi Māori Aotearoa Operations Manager

Image: Te Hono ki Aotearoa on the river Thames for the Queens jubilee. Image used with permission.

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21 days ago

Driving out the devil – A history of mākutu in Aotearoa / New Zealand

The Team from Alexander Turnbull Library

Date: Monday, 10 February, 2020
Time: 5pm to 7pm. Public talk from 5:30pm to 6:30pm. Refreshments from 6:30pm to 7pm
Cost: Free event.
Location: National Library, corner Molesworth and Aitken Streets, Thorndon

Lecture by Judith Binney Fellow, Dr Nepia Mahuika

A free public lecture by 2019 … View more
Date: Monday, 10 February, 2020
Time: 5pm to 7pm. Public talk from 5:30pm to 6:30pm. Refreshments from 6:30pm to 7pm
Cost: Free event.
Location: National Library, corner Molesworth and Aitken Streets, Thorndon

Lecture by Judith Binney Fellow, Dr Nepia Mahuika

A free public lecture by 2019 Judith Binney Fellow, Dr Nepia Mahuika.

A discussion about the Māori practice mākutu
Through a Western lens the Māori practice mākutu has too often been presented as witchcraft, being described by some as the ‘black arts’, ‘black magic, and ‘curses.’
Drawing on work for a forthcoming book on the history of mākutu in Aotearoa New Zealand, Dr Mahuika overturns simplistic perceptions of mākutu as ‘Māori witchcraft’.
Exploring connections that mākutu has to other indigenous peoples in the Pacific and abroad, the lecture challenges all New Zealanders to reimagine the way we see mākutu, bringing a deeper understanding to a topic that has often been misunderstood and sensationalised in novels, films and media reports.

The event will be followed by light refreshments.

About the speaker
Dr Mahuika was the inaugural Judith Binney Fellow in 2019 and is Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Waikato, where he teaches courses in New Zealand History, specialising in Māori and Indigenous History. His Judith Binney Fellowship has supported the completion of a research project on the history of mākutu in Aotearoa / New Zealand.

Dr Mahuika is also president of Te Pouhere Kōrero, a broad collective of Māori colleagues interested in Māori history.

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22 days ago

Asking

Lesley from Ngaio

Good morning....does anyone have any insulation eg (pink bats) laying around that you would like to get rid of please.

21 days ago

Hunger for Colour - swap and save!

Resene

Brighten the day of someone in need and bring a little colour into your life...

By donating a can of food you'll save on your testpot purchase (save up to $5.80 on an 80ml testpot) while also helping provide disadvantaged Kiwis with food parcels when they need them most.

Resene will gift… View more
Brighten the day of someone in need and bring a little colour into your life...

By donating a can of food you'll save on your testpot purchase (save up to $5.80 on an 80ml testpot) while also helping provide disadvantaged Kiwis with food parcels when they need them most.

Resene will gift all food donations to The Salvation Army local foodbanks and other community foodbanks.

Start gathering up those cans so you can swap and save at your local Resene owned ColorShop.
Learn more

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21 days ago

Nissan Maxima 2007 for sale

Nick from Wadestown

Only $2500
Very smooth and powerful with 3.5 v6 CVT
Just serviced, new WOF and new brakes.
270k mileage and a few dents. Great to drive.

Price: $2,500

21 days ago

CANCELLED: A Wellington Rhapsody

Katie Townshend Reporter from Dominion Post

A Wellington Rhapsody - including a performance by Orchestra Wellington and the Bohemian Rhapsody screening - has been cancelled due to strong winds. There is no scheduled postponement date for this event.

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22 days ago

Wastewater pipe broken

May from Newlands

Can anyone recommended a drainlayer who can replace the wastewater pipe leading from private property to the public sewer main? The footpath needs to be dug up to access and replace the broken pipes. Thanks

22 days ago

Waitangi Day at He Tohu – ‘Walking backwards into the Future’

The Team from Alexander Turnbull Library

Date: Thursday, 6 February, 2020
Time: 9am to 5pm. He Tohu tours will run every half hour from 9:30am. Tours are 20 mins long. Last tour at 4pm. Bilingual tours at 11am and 2pm.
Cost: Free event.
Location: Te Ahumairangi (ground floor), National Library, corner Molesworth and Aitken Streets, … View more
Date: Thursday, 6 February, 2020
Time: 9am to 5pm. He Tohu tours will run every half hour from 9:30am. Tours are 20 mins long. Last tour at 4pm. Bilingual tours at 11am and 2pm.
Cost: Free event.
Location: Te Ahumairangi (ground floor), National Library, corner Molesworth and Aitken Streets, Thorndon

‘Walking backwards into the future’

‘Walking backwards into the future’ — is an expression that asks us to use our experiences to build a positive future. Bring the family to the National Library on Waitangi Day and see the Treaty of Waitangi. Learn about New Zealand's constitutional past to help you imagine the future.

‘Walking backwards into the future’ encourages us to look at where we’ve come from and the journey that still lies ahead. It asks that we use our experiences to build a positive future.

Celebrate Waitangi Day at He Tohu

Waitangi Day at He Tohu is an opportunity for you and your whānau to see the Treaty of Waitangi. Activities will include:
•whānau and bilingual He Tohu tours
• a reading corner with books/ comics and other Treaty resources
• film from Nga Taonga Sound and Vision, and
• a kids’ craft table with Treaty-related activities to help the new generation walk backwards into the future.

He Tohu tours will run every half hour from 9:30am. Tours are 20 mins long. Last tour at 4pm. Bilingual tours at 11am and 2pm.

Storytelling with acclaimed storyteller Apirana Taylor

In between the two bilingual tours of He Tohu, acclaimed storyteller Apirana Taylor will delight audiences of all ages with two story sessions.

Wellington City Libraries will host the two sessions at He Matapihi on the Ground Floor of the Library. Each session will last (around) 40 minutes.
Apirana will tell the following stories:
•11.30am — 'Talking flutes: stories for the young'
• 1.00pm — 'Pūrākau: children’s stories by Apirana Taylor'

See the Treaty of Waitangi

The Treaty of Waitangi is not a single large sheet of paper but a group of nine documents: seven on paper and two on parchment. Together they represent an agreement drawn up between representatives of the British Crown on the one hand and representatives of Māori iwi and hapū on the other.

Te Tiriti o Waitangi is named after the place in the Bay of Islands where it was first signed on 6 February 1840, but it was also signed in a number of other locations around the country in the following months.

See all nine sheets when you visit the He Tohu exhibition. Get a head start and have a look at the Archives New Zealand online exhibition about the Treaty of Waitangi.

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22 days ago

Display of full residential address.

Marty from Johnsonville

A couple of days ago I put up the following post:

Afternoon folks, You may want to be conscious of your address details that you display on your activities albeit notice boards or buy & sell or any website forum. Yes there are those out there that may take advantage knowing this information… View more
A couple of days ago I put up the following post:

Afternoon folks, You may want to be conscious of your address details that you display on your activities albeit notice boards or buy & sell or any website forum. Yes there are those out there that may take advantage knowing this information of you. As opposed to showing your full residential address you may want to amend this to display only your street or better still just your suburb. Have a great day.



I queried Neighbourly about their thoughts on this. I put this subject out there just as a discussion.


Neighbourly response is and I can also see it from their side:
Neighbourly has been designed to help create stronger, safer communities, and a big part of this is knowing who lives next door or down the road from you. We do encourage members to share these details. These personal details are only seen by direct neighbours, the minimum info you can share is your name and address (you can choose to hide your street number), and this is Neighbourly's point of difference - and what makes the site work really well! What we ask you to share is little more than you'd find on a piece of mail in a letterbox. All members go through an address verification process to confirm they live where they say they do. Any member who has not completed this step has limited and temporary access to Neighbourly; they cannot see other neighbours' profiles, including address information, until they are verified. Further on this - only Neighbourly members in your suburb can see your address. I hope this helps, Marty. We appreciate you sharing your thoughts with us regarding members who are not aware their address is shown. This feature of Neighbourly is shared when signing up and you can view this in our privacy policy: www.neighbourly.co.nz...

I will leave this with you if you want to have a positive discussion or feedback :-)
As always have a great day.

22 days ago

Quentin Duthie - Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee

Community Engagement Advisor from Greater Wellington

Kia ora koutou, I am Quentin, a member of the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee tasked with making recommendations to Greater Wellington Regional Council on the future of our coastal and freshwater quality, and how our water is used. Our waterways and all the fish and species that live in them … View moreKia ora koutou, I am Quentin, a member of the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee tasked with making recommendations to Greater Wellington Regional Council on the future of our coastal and freshwater quality, and how our water is used. Our waterways and all the fish and species that live in them are precious taonga, so we have set out to understand how they are valued and what should be done to provide the future we want for our water.

To me, this Whaitua project is a journey where we can apply our experience and values, and develop a vision that enhances the mana of the whenua, the tangata whenua and the whole community.
We need you to be part of our journey on the Whaitua Project. This is a journey to improve the health and mauri of our waterways, we need to fix our waste and stormwater network. These are big changes, and needs to reflect our communities’ views informed by good evidence and information.

Connect with us to talk about what we can do together. You can reach us at whaitua@gw.govt.nz. To see what we have been doing visit our Facebook page, and to share what you value about our water and your solutions have your say by following the link below.

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22 days ago

Get a free Resene paint testpot!

Julia de Ruiter from The Salvation Army NZ

Colour your world this February by taking part in the sixth Resene Hunger for Colour campaign! During the month of February you can swap a can of food for a 60-80ml testpot of Resene paint with all cans collected being donated to Salvation Army foodbanks.

Over the last five years, this campaign … View more
Colour your world this February by taking part in the sixth Resene Hunger for Colour campaign! During the month of February you can swap a can of food for a 60-80ml testpot of Resene paint with all cans collected being donated to Salvation Army foodbanks.

Over the last five years, this campaign has seen Resene donate enough testpots to paint over 100,000 colourful square metres and generous Kiwis donate more than 190,000 cans.

We’d love to see the creations you make with your testpots – just message them to us here on Neighbourly for a chance to be featured!

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22 days ago

Love Where You Live - February 1st to 29th 🥰

The Team from Neighbourhood Support New Zealand

Love is in the air this month! We’re not just talking about Valentine’s Day... we’re talking about this month’s national campaign.

Our theme for February is all about finding ways to show your home and community a little extra love and care. Whether it’s organising a street clean up, … View more
Love is in the air this month! We’re not just talking about Valentine’s Day... we’re talking about this month’s national campaign.

Our theme for February is all about finding ways to show your home and community a little extra love and care. Whether it’s organising a street clean up, helping a neighbour tidy up their property, putting together a working bee, or installing a communal pātaka or library - there are countless ways to make our neighbourhoods more enjoyable for everyone.

Don’t forget to share the love! Let us know how you’re improving your neighbourhood this month by email or tag us online and include the following hashtag:

#NSNZlovewhereyoulive

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