Hororata, Hororata

130 days ago

Fun geocaching activity for family and friends

The Team from Ministry of Education

Looking for an outdoor activity to do with your family and friends? The Tuia Mātauranga GeoTour is a digital treasure hunt in local areas around Aotearoa NZ.

It’s on now, and if you’re keen on collectibles, there are badges and a limited edition GeoTour coin up for grabs. #TuiaMātauranga … View more
Looking for an outdoor activity to do with your family and friends? The Tuia Mātauranga GeoTour is a digital treasure hunt in local areas around Aotearoa NZ.

It’s on now, and if you’re keen on collectibles, there are badges and a limited edition GeoTour coin up for grabs. #TuiaMātauranga #Tuia250

133 days ago

WATCH: Riverside Markets opening week

The Team from Play Stuff

Hi Neighbours, were you one of the 25,000 people who visited the new Riverside Markets on Saturday?

Thousands of people visited Riverside Market in Christchurch at the weekend, with stallholders often selling out hours before closing time.

Play Now: play.stuff.co.nz...

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132 days ago

Should schools stop asking parents for donations?

Nicole Mathewson Reporter from The Press

Hi neighbours - it was introduced to reduce the "significant financial pressure" on Kiwi families, but so far only about one in four eligible schools have signed up to the Government scheme to replace voluntary donations.

Under the draft Education Amendment Bill, decile 1-7 state and … View more
Hi neighbours - it was introduced to reduce the "significant financial pressure" on Kiwi families, but so far only about one in four eligible schools have signed up to the Government scheme to replace voluntary donations.

Under the draft Education Amendment Bill, decile 1-7 state and state-integrated schools can opt to receive a payment of $150 per student, per year if they agree not to ask parents or caregivers for donations.

But as of last week, with just over a month to go until boards of trustees need to register, only 471 out of 1749 schools had told the Ministry of Education that they intend to sign up to the initiative.

In Canterbury, Shirley Boys' High School has rejected the discretionary grants, with headmaster John Laurenson saying its co-curriculum programme "would have to cease" if it took up the Government's offer.

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132 days ago

How a café owner gave a homeless man a job...

AMI Insurance

Tom Reilly took a chance on a local homeless man, Matty Harris, and gave him a job in his cafe and art space in Titirangi. As a result, Matty has found a sense of purpose and rediscovered his passion for art. “Tom has taken me as I am and given me opportunities that no-one else would. It would be… View moreTom Reilly took a chance on a local homeless man, Matty Harris, and gave him a job in his cafe and art space in Titirangi. As a result, Matty has found a sense of purpose and rediscovered his passion for art. “Tom has taken me as I am and given me opportunities that no-one else would. It would be good if kindness like that was contagious.”

To read more about this inspiring act of kindness visit the AMI Hub.

#OurKindaKindness
Read more now

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132 days ago

Post your vote today!

Selwyn District Council from Selwyn District Council

Voting closes at noon on Saturday. If you’re posting your votes, get them in the mail today to make sure they reach us in time.

You can also drop your voting papers in to a ballot box at the Council’s Rolleston offices, at the Darfield, Leeston, Lincoln and Rolleston libraries, Selwyn Aquatic … View more
Voting closes at noon on Saturday. If you’re posting your votes, get them in the mail today to make sure they reach us in time.

You can also drop your voting papers in to a ballot box at the Council’s Rolleston offices, at the Darfield, Leeston, Lincoln and Rolleston libraries, Selwyn Aquatic Centre, Lincoln Event Centre and West Melton Community and Recreation Centre – open all this week during normal hours, and on Saturday up to 12 midday.

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133 days ago

Poll: Should parents be fined if their children drop out of school?

Neighbourly.co.nz

The National Party is considering a policy of fining parents $3000 if their children drop out of school and don't enter further education or training.

Simon Bridges says "The reality is if you're not in work, education or training, you're going to be languishing in a dole … View more
The National Party is considering a policy of fining parents $3000 if their children drop out of school and don't enter further education or training.

Simon Bridges says "The reality is if you're not in work, education or training, you're going to be languishing in a dole queue, and the evidence is potentially for a long time". Do you agree with this policy? Should parents be fined?

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Should parents be fined if their children drop out of school?
  • 35.3% Yes - they are responsible for their children
    35.3% Complete
  • 25.9% It's not fair to assume they'll end up in the dole queue
    25.9% Complete
  • 38.8% No - it's not the parents' choice
    38.8% Complete
1509 votes
135 days ago

Recycle your unwanted mobile phones

NZ Telecommunications Forum

Spring is here so it’s time for your annual spring clean. If you’re anything like 69 percent of New Zealand households, you’ll have at least one unconnected mobile phone gathering dust in a drawer or cupboard.

Recycle these unwanted phones with RE:MOBILE.

RE:MOBILE is a not-for-profit … View more
Spring is here so it’s time for your annual spring clean. If you’re anything like 69 percent of New Zealand households, you’ll have at least one unconnected mobile phone gathering dust in a drawer or cupboard.

Recycle these unwanted phones with RE:MOBILE.

RE:MOBILE is a not-for-profit mobile phone recycling scheme which raises money for Sustainable Coastlines.

Recycling your mobile phone is free, easy and good for the environment. Not only does it keep harmful items out of landfill, it also stops the precious materials in your phone from going to waste.

Visit RE:MOBILE to find out how to recycle your mobile phone.
Learn more

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137 days ago

CLIMATE IN A GARDENING PERSPECTIVE

Wilma from Coalgate - Glentunnel

I have copied an article that, in the view of current upheaval with climate change environmental activist Greta Thunberg, might change your view of "global warming", the long term effects and the drive behind all this.
Kind Regards,
Wilma Tijsen

Gardening Articles for week ending 5th … View more
I have copied an article that, in the view of current upheaval with climate change environmental activist Greta Thunberg, might change your view of "global warming", the long term effects and the drive behind all this.
Kind Regards,
Wilma Tijsen

Gardening Articles for week ending 5th OCTOBER 2019
Written by Wally Richards.

CLIMATE IN A GARDENING PERSPECTIVE

Climate has been a topic this week with all sorts of protests and I even see on the news some major world banks jumping on the bandwagon (which is a good indication that there is money to be made from climate change)
As a gardener I have a strong interest in the climate as it obviously affects what I can do in the garden and when I can do it.
I have noticed over the last 73 years of my life that climate changes greatly during a 12 month period which means as the climate starts to warm in the spring and daylight hours extend along with the natural warming of soil temperatures.
Then I can germinate seeds of hardy plants once soil temp is 10 degrees or more and I can also plant out seedlings of hardy plants.
Over the next couple of months conditions and warmth improve allowing me to start planting out more tender plants such as tomatoes. Traditionally Labour Weekend which is towards the end of October is the time for the planting out of tender plants as it is normally safer about then.
But the climate is fickle and a cold snap can happen right up to Christmas either killing tender plants or stopping them growing till conditions improve.
Cucumbers are a great teller of the conditions as they will only sulk out doors till things really warm up.
Grown in a glasshouse where they are protected against the weather and its is much warmer, it is there that they will thrive.
Later in the new year after the longest day climate once again changes as the Southern Hemisphere in the Earth's orbit tilts away placing the sun at a lower ebb making for shorter day light hours and cooler autumn temperatures.
This heralds the beginning of the end of the growing season as we race into our winter months.
The climate temperature variation in Palmerston North (Now living in Marton) from a high in summer average of 23 degrees down to a winter average of 5 degrees which according to my wardrobe, is a big range of temperature.
At the equator; which is not affected by the tilt of the planet's axils much we see the sun is up about 6 am and going down quickly at 6 pm all year round and temperature up in the 30's as average.
So climate obviously varies as to where you are on the planet and latitude make a big difference in temperature and climate.
Auckland is at L 36.84, Wellington at L 41.28, Christchurch L 43.53 and Invercargill at L 46.41 It is obvious and well known that the climate/weather in Auckland is very much different to the climate/weather in Invercargill.
Amazing as that is only a variation in Latitude of 10 degrees!
The climate history of the planet according to scientists has change dramatically since the beginning of the planet to current time and will continue to do so till the end of the planet's existence.
The vast changes that have occurred has effected civilizations, species and the terrain.
Ice age to tropical heat and then back to ice age cycles that scientists can measure and the time frames of them. So one truth pertains, 'The climate is always changing whether there are mankind living here or not.' I know in my 70 odd years in Palmerston North I have seen incredible climate change over the years such as in winter, as a school boy it was common to come out of school at lunchtime to see frost still on the ground where it was a bit shaded from the sun.
Now days we don't even see much of a frost.
But back in my school boy days summer was far hotter and better weather than now days.
I know as about 50 years ago I had no problems growing a passion fruit vine in the open on a small fence. Admittedly I had to put sacks over it in winter to protect it from the frosts, which there were plenty.
But in the summer because of the better warmth it would grow like wildfire and produce heaps of fruit.
Now if I planted one in the same situation these days it would grow a little in the heat of summer, sulk in winter and then die.
Even providing protection and planted in a heat prone spot a passion fruit would not do as well as they used to do. The consensus of this is the winters are much milder than they used to be but also the summers are much milder than they used to be.
(According to Mr Passionfruit he knows more about climate than all the scientists in the world)
I also remember in Palmerston North in the spring and into the summer months we would be battered almost every day by a westerly wind which would just about drive people nuts.
Palmerston North, they used to say, that it was windier than Wellington. That was about 40-50 years ago and it was a regular feature of that time of the year. Does that happen still? No nothing like it used to do. Climate change.
I bet that if you have a few years of maturity and lived in the same area most of your time on the planet you will also recall that your climate has changed also.
Another important fact is that when the planet was a lot younger and prehistoric animals of gigantic size roamed and the vegetation was also gigantic, there was according to the scientists, very high levels of CO2.
[Dinosaurs that roamed the Earth 250 million years ago lived in a world with five times more carbon dioxide than is present on Earth today]
This was the reason that plants grew about 5 times bigger than the same plants today. (Cycads & ferns) These composted down to become the fossil fuels of modern times.
The source of CO2 was from lots of volcanic activity. Even today a volcano can release more CO2 in a short time that would take mankind's emissions a year or more to duplicate.
That is why nurserymen generate CO2 in their glasshouses to accelerate the growth of their crops.
Likely the worst effects mankind has on the planet is the destruction of vegetation such as rain forests and jungles.The lungs of the planet taking in (CO2) and releasing oxygen (O2) and pollution destroying our oceans.
We don't see people out marching and protesting about the large dead zones in the oceans which is a situation that is definitely man made.
Thus the more CO2 around the better, the plants will be in your garden will be better off along with the food crops that feed the people. Reduce the CO2 and you reduce the food produced.
Now that is something to be concerned about as hungry people that can't feed their children can be very dangerous. (As with any species)
I read an article this week which you may find interesting see at

mailchi.mp...

My thoughts on this article are along the lines of; Climate Scare is the biggest Ponzi scam ever seen on the planet and I might not be too far wrong.
One thing I do know is that reduction of direct sunlight affects our plants greatly as they need blue skies and direct sun to make carbohydrates from the sunlight.
Cloudy skies affect plant's growth, hazy skies even more so.
I see that there is a plot to dim the skies to supposedly prevent global warming.
This is alarming for two reasons dimming the sky with pollution actual increases the heat from UV radiation making the earth hotter from the then trapped heat.
The other aspect it would prevent food crops from growing and the planet would become a wilderness with little life left on it.
In 1974, Henry Kissinger suggested using food as a weapon to induce targeted population reduction in a previously classified 200-page report, National Security Study Memorandum 200:

For those that have already made up their minds that man-made climate change is the biggest problem facing mankind, can do as others have done in the past, un subscribe and tell me to stick to gardening and don't talk about things that do not conform to their beliefs.

Thank goodness that we still have a little bit of Freedom of Speech left. (I wonder for how long)

Problems ring me at 0800 466464 (Palmerston North 3570606)
Email wallyjr@gardenews.co.nz
Web site www.gardenews.co.nz...
Phone 0800 466464

Garden Pages and News at www.gardenews.co.nz...
Shar Pei pages at www.sharpei.co.nz...
Mail Order products at www.0800466464.co.nz...

New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990. Part II of the Act covers a broad range of Civil and Political Rights. As part of the right to life and the security of the person, the Act guarantees everyone:

1 The right not to be deprived of life except in accordance with fundamental justice (Section 8)

2 The right not to be subjected to torture or to cruel, degrading, or disproportionately severe treatment or punishment (Section 9)

3 The right not to be subjected to medical or scientific experimentation without consent (Section 10)

4 The right to refuse to undergo any medical treatment (Section 11)

Furthermore, the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 guarantees everyone: Freedom of Thought, Conscience, and Religion.
This includes the right to freedom of thought, conscience, religion, and belief,
INCLUDING THE RIGHT TO ADOPT AND HOLD OPINIONS WITHOUT INTERFERENCE (Section 1)

Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.

QUESTION MORE

If you do not want to receive the weekly articles anymore (or other emails from us) then click the unsubscribe link below.
Regards Wally Richards

136 days ago

Show Me Shorts Film Festival

The Team from Play Stuff

Hi Neighbours, Play Stuff is proud to present the Show Me Shorts Film Festival launching this weekend all over NZ.

Show Me Shorts exists to connect New Zealanders with short films and share New Zealand short films with the world.

Discover your local programme @ showmeshorts.co.nz

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136 days ago

Poll: Who will you vote for?

Kamala Hayman Reporter from The Press

With only one week to go until polls close, we are running a fresh survey of Neighbourly members on who should be the mayor of Christchurch. Vote below.

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Who will you vote for?
  • 1.6% Blair Anderson
    1.6% Complete
  • 4.7% J T Anderson
    4.7% Complete
  • 37.9% Lianne Dalziel
    37.9% Complete
  • 0% Jim Glass
    0% Complete
  • 2% Tubby Hansen
    2% Complete
  • 2% Robin MCarthy
    2% Complete
  • 0.8% Stephen McPaike
    0.8% Complete
  • 7.8% John Minto
    7.8% Complete
  • 39.1% Darryll Park
    39.1% Complete
  • 1.2% Sam Park
    1.2% Complete
  • 0.8% Adrian-Cosmin Schonborn
    0.8% Complete
  • 0.4% Peter Wakeman
    0.4% Complete
  • 2% Aaron White
    2% Complete
256 votes
136 days ago

Get your voting papers in on ‘Vote Day’ - Saturday 5 October

Daniel Webster from Local Government New Zealand

Local Government New Zealand is urging people to post their voting papers on Vote Day – Saturday 5 October 2019.

All voting papers must be returned to the relevant council by midday on Saturday 12 October, and voters need to factor in the time it will take the papers to get through the postal … View more
Local Government New Zealand is urging people to post their voting papers on Vote Day – Saturday 5 October 2019.

All voting papers must be returned to the relevant council by midday on Saturday 12 October, and voters need to factor in the time it will take the papers to get through the postal system.

New Zealand Post advises that the Standard Post delivery target is up to 3 working days for nationwide delivery, while delivery to and from rural areas may take longer. However, these targets are guides only, and are not guaranteed – delivery may take longer.

Visit www.nzpost.co.nz... to find your nearest post box or office. To get more information on your local candidates, visit policylocal.nz and local council websites for both information and meet the candidate schedules.

“Some of the main reasons people give for not voting are they forgot, ran out of time or were too busy,” says LGNZ Chief Executive Malcolm Alexander.

“So to make sure people give themselves the best chance to have their say we are encouraging people to vote early on what we’ve dubbed Vote Day. Fill out your papers during the week and then to pop them in the paid envelope and into the nearest post box on Saturday 5 October.”

“Voting papers have to arrive at council offices by midday Saturday 12 October, so sending them in on Vote Day gives them plenty of time to get through the postal system.”

Mr Alexander says it is important New Zealanders participate in the selection of the people who will make decisions that affect most people’s lives on a daily basis.

“Local government shapes the place that you live. It’s the pavements you walk on, the roads where you drive, the water you drink, shower in and swim in, your parks, libraries and swimming pools where you take the kids,” Mr Alexander says.

“There’s been a lot of robust public conversation around climate change, the housing crisis, the quality of our water and our transport options, and now is the time to turn that conversation into a vote that influences your local leadership.”

“Voters can still post their papers after 5 October, but there is no harm in doing it earlier,” Mr Alexander says.

Eligible voters who didn’t enrol before 16 August won’t receive their papers in the mail, but can make a special vote by visiting their local council offices, or by contacting their Council Electoral Officer.

What: ‘Vote Day’
When: Saturday 5 October 2019
Why: Make sure you have your say by voting early
How: Visit www.nzpost.co.nz... to find your nearest post box or office. To get more information on your local candidates, visit policylocal.nz and local council websites for both information and meet the candidate schedules.

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136 days ago

Cape Reinga to Bluff

The Team from Graeme Dingle Foundation

The amazing Marian Campbell and friend Kay Garland have taken off on their journey along the Te Araroa trail from Cape Reinga to Bluff.

She's raising funds for the youth in our programmes and we'll keep you updated throughout her journey.

Thank you for inspiring us and showing young … View more
The amazing Marian Campbell and friend Kay Garland have taken off on their journey along the Te Araroa trail from Cape Reinga to Bluff.

She's raising funds for the youth in our programmes and we'll keep you updated throughout her journey.

Thank you for inspiring us and showing young people across Aotearoa that what they have inside is greater than any obstacle.

Kia kaha Marian and Kay!

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137 days ago

#NeighbourlySupporters - win one of TEN vouchers!

The Team from Neighbourly.co.nz

Here at Neighbourly HQ we love watching sports together - and know many of our members do too. We want to put the challenge out there - how about watching the games with your neighbours? *** We have TEN $50 Countdown vouchers to give away! Enter by commenting on our blog here. ***

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137 days ago

WATCH: Christchurch brewery wins top milk stout award

The Team from Play Stuff

Hi Neighbours, Have you tried this award-winning milk stout? Brewed locally in Woolston and taking on the world.

Against more 3000 entries, Cassels Brewing Company from Christchurch won the World Beer Awards 2019 for its Milk Stout.

Play Now: play.stuff.co.nz...

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