Waiohau, Whakatane

10 hours ago

Before and after cleaning

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Whakatane

These curtains are looking as good as new after being treated for mould removal. If you have orange or black spots on your curtains - that is most likely mould! It loves a combination of dust, damp, and heat. It can smell very musty, especially if left to grow. We are experts in mould removal and … View moreThese curtains are looking as good as new after being treated for mould removal. If you have orange or black spots on your curtains - that is most likely mould! It loves a combination of dust, damp, and heat. It can smell very musty, especially if left to grow. We are experts in mould removal and ensure curtains are treated with no colour loss - if you have any questions feel free to give us a call and we can have a chat. 0800 579 0501

2 days ago

What is Yarn: What It’s Made From, How You Make It and More

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Whakatane

When researching or reading about different fabrics, you are likely to see the word yarn mentioned a lot. ‘Made from spun yarns’ or ‘with synthetic yarns’ are a couple of examples. But what is yarn? What is spun yarn? Are there other types? What does it all mean, and how much relevance does… View moreWhen researching or reading about different fabrics, you are likely to see the word yarn mentioned a lot. ‘Made from spun yarns’ or ‘with synthetic yarns’ are a couple of examples. But what is yarn? What is spun yarn? Are there other types? What does it all mean, and how much relevance does this bear to your final fabric? That’s what we are here to look at in a little more detail.

What is Yarn?
Yarn is a length of fibres. That’s the simplest way to explain it. It is a continuous length of fibres which are interlocked, and it’s used to produce fabrics, as well as in crocheting, knitting, embroidery and ropemaking.

This means that we can split yarn into two different ‘categories’ of sorts. The thread that is used for embroidery or in sewing machines, as well as yarn (commonly known as balls-of-wool) used in crafts such as knitting or crocheting, are long lengths that are bought as yarns.

The alternative would be a yarn which is then knitted or woven into a fabric. The textile is then bought as fabric, in lengths, rather than the yarn itself being purchased separately. This second description is the one that we will explore further in this post.

What is Yarn Made From?
Yarn can be made from such a variety of different fibres. This includes both natural and synthetic fibres. The most common plant fibre is cotton, however, you can also use other natural fibres such as bamboo. Alongside cotton, the synthetic polyester fibre makes up the two most commonly used fibres. Animal fibres are also often used, such as wool, harvested from sheep, as well as cashmere (harvested from goats) Angora (from rabbits) and silk (from insect larvae).

What is the Difference Between Spun and Filament Yarn?
Spun yarn is made by twisting staple fibres together in either an S or Z twist, to make a single thread. The process of twisting the fibres together into yarn is called spinning and it was one of the first processed to be industrialised. Spun yarns can contain a single type of fibre, or you can spin various types of fibre together to give you a blend.

Filament yarn is made up of filament fibres which are either twisted together or simply grouped together. It can either be composed of one filament, which is called a monofilament, or it could be made of more than one, in which case it would be known as a multifilament. This can be as few as two or three filament fibres, or even up to 50, or more.

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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3 days ago

Meet our Houseplant Hero 2021!

Mei Leng Wong Reporter from NZ Gardener & Get Growing

Dear neighbours,

Please meet Alyce Read of Nelson, who uses her houseplant collection to connect with others and help them overcome mental health challenges. "You wouldn’t take a plant and put it in a dark corner and fail to water it and expect it to thrive. So we should look at ourselves … View more
Dear neighbours,

Please meet Alyce Read of Nelson, who uses her houseplant collection to connect with others and help them overcome mental health challenges. "You wouldn’t take a plant and put it in a dark corner and fail to water it and expect it to thrive. So we should look at ourselves that way," she says. "If we are not thriving in the way that we would wish, it might not be any fault of ours, it might be the conditions that we are under."

3 days ago

Random Acts of Kindness – August 1st to 31st 💐

The Team from Neighbourhood Support New Zealand

All it takes is a kind gesture to change someone’s day. From giving flowers to a neighbour ‘just because’ to paying it forward in line at a cafe - this month we’re encouraging our members and supporters to make New Zealand a better place one random act of kindness at a time.

The options … View more
All it takes is a kind gesture to change someone’s day. From giving flowers to a neighbour ‘just because’ to paying it forward in line at a cafe - this month we’re encouraging our members and supporters to make New Zealand a better place one random act of kindness at a time.

The options for doing so are endless! Being kind doesn’t have to cost a thing, after all a smile is free. For those who want to go the extra mile, here’s some other ideas: take a gift over to new neighbours and introduce yourself, build a free community library for your street, buy extra kai at the grocery store to donate to a food bank, bring treats into work for colleagues, send an encouraging text to someone who needs it, let a car into the traffic ahead of you, write positive messages in chalk on sidewalks around your neighbourhood, or surprise loved ones with a visit.

Want to share your thoughts? Let us know how you’re spreading kindness this month by tagging us in your social media posts or emailing us your photos, videos, or experiences to:

info@neighbourhoodsupport.co.nz

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4 days ago

Looking for an apprentice?

Competenz

Advertise your entry-level and apprentice roles with Competenz through our online job board, we have pre-qualified and motivated jobseekers ready to match with your organisation.
Find your next apprentice with Competenz!

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5 days ago

Improve your digital literacy today!

The Team from Digital Boost

Are you a small business owner looking to make better use of the online space?

Digital Boost is a free online learning platform packed with 3-5 minute educational videos on topics like:
- Websites
- Digital marketing/social media
- Online tools
- Digital accounting
- Business insights, … View more
Are you a small business owner looking to make better use of the online space?

Digital Boost is a free online learning platform packed with 3-5 minute educational videos on topics like:
- Websites
- Digital marketing/social media
- Online tools
- Digital accounting
- Business insights, feedback and reporting
- Future technologies

Plus, pick up tips and tricks from our interviews with other small business owners across the nation.

The future is digital and we want your business to be part of it.
Sign up today

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6 days ago

Make a Living Wall

Robert Anderson from

If you enjoy growing your own potted plants and would like a stylish way of displaying them inside the home, then this month's project could be just what you need. I've been admiring living walls and hanging gardens for some time now, and decided to create an achievable small-scale … View moreIf you enjoy growing your own potted plants and would like a stylish way of displaying them inside the home, then this month's project could be just what you need. I've been admiring living walls and hanging gardens for some time now, and decided to create an achievable small-scale version to house small pots and fresh herbs in my kitchen. These shelves are affordable and easy to make, and ideal for apartments and smaller homes without much garden space.

For this project you will need:
• 1 length of untreated pine 20mm thick and 120mm wide
• Hand saw or skill saw, sandpaper
• Drill with 72mm hole saw drill bit and 7.5mm drill bit (for 7mm rope)
• 9 x 9cm terracotta pots
• White synthetic general purpose rope 7mm x 10m, 8 x white plastic cable ties
• Resene Colorwood Whitewash, speed brush or synthetic paintbrush

• Various herbs or small plants

Step one: Cut your length of pine into three pieces, each 600mm long. You can do this with either a hand saw or a skill saw. Once cut, give them a sand.

Step two: Measure out the placement of your holes that will hold the terracotta pots. I spaced mine out at 150mm centres. Repeat these markings for all three lengths of timber.

Step three: Using a drill with a hole saw attachment, cut out 72mm (D) sized holes to fit your terracotta pots. I practised first on a spare cut of timber I had lying around, to make sure that the hole I was drilling was the right size. For my 9cm pots, I found that 72mm ensured a good fit. Tidy up each hole with a light sand.

Step four: Now you need to cut the holes for your rope. Measure in 20mm from each corner and mark your drilling spot. Use a 7.5mm drill bit to make one hole in each corner (the size drill bit you use will depend on the thickness of the rope you are using to hang your shelves – adjust accordingly). Repeat for all three lengths of timber.

Step five: To achieve a fresh, clean look I used Resene Colorwood Whitewash interior wood stain. There are lots of colours to choose from, so you could pick whichever best suits the timber you are using and where the finished project will be hanging. I applied two coats of Whitewash using a speed brush, or synthetic brush.

Step six: Cut your rope into four equal lengths and thread each length through the corner holes of your shelves starting from the bottom. Tie each length of rope into a knot on the underside of the bottom shelf, so the bottom shelf rests on these knots.

Step seven: Adjust the placement of your shelves until you get them evenly spaced. Make sure you allow room for the pots to sit in the shelves, and room for your plants to grow of course. I spaced my shelves at 200mm apart. Secure the undersides of your remaining shelves with cable ties, they are a good solution because they aren't hugely visible and they don't budge. Trim the long ends of the cable ties once in place.

Step eight: Add your pots and plants, and hang in your chosen spot. Make sure that you use hooks that can safely take the weight of your shelves.



DIY with pictures: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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6 days ago
6 days ago

Wooden butterfly

Resene ColorShop Gisborne

Recreate a Kiwiana classic using butterflise and Resene testpots.

Find out how to create your own.

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8 days ago

Wish dinner time was a little...simpler?

The Team from HelloFresh

Hi Neighbours, back to school has thrown your routine into chaos? HelloFresh has dinner sorted for you. With our +20 quick and easy recipes (covering a range of dietary needs with new ones added every week!), dinner time will become a delicious breeze🌿

With no lock-in contracts, you can … View more
Hi Neighbours, back to school has thrown your routine into chaos? HelloFresh has dinner sorted for you. With our +20 quick and easy recipes (covering a range of dietary needs with new ones added every week!), dinner time will become a delicious breeze🌿

With no lock-in contracts, you can pause, skip or cancel your subscription at any time. You can also switch up your plan sizes and delivery times to suit your household and schedule.

Sign up today and get up to $100 off across your first 4 boxes with code “NEIGHBOUR”. All you need to do is cook!
Order now

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8 days ago

60+? Book your vaccination now.

The Team from Ministry of Health

Are you aged 60+? If so, go to BookMyVaccine.nz now to reserve your spot to get the COVID-19 vaccination.

You can be vaccinated at any point from now – there’s no cut off.

Getting vaccinated is the best way to protect you and your whānau from COVID-19.

The stronger our immunity, the … View more
Are you aged 60+? If so, go to BookMyVaccine.nz now to reserve your spot to get the COVID-19 vaccination.

You can be vaccinated at any point from now – there’s no cut off.

Getting vaccinated is the best way to protect you and your whānau from COVID-19.

The stronger our immunity, the greater our possibilities.

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9 days ago

Learn new skills, unlock your future.

Te Wānanga o Aotearoa

Want to grow your knowledge and skills to boost your career options?

We can help you develop your skill set with one of our courses in Team Leadership, Adminstration & Technology or Money Management.

Enrolments are now open with classes starting in July 2021. Don’t miss out! … View more
Want to grow your knowledge and skills to boost your career options?

We can help you develop your skill set with one of our courses in Team Leadership, Adminstration & Technology or Money Management.

Enrolments are now open with classes starting in July 2021. Don’t miss out! Sign up today.
Find out more

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10 days ago

How to Make Hemp Rope

Robert Anderson from

Knowing how to make rope was once a critical skill for survival and self-sufficiency on the frontier. Early settlers were able to make rope from a variety of materials, but the main thing they used was hemp.

A rapid growing plant, hemp is perfect for making rope. Hemp grows fast. It produces up … View more
Knowing how to make rope was once a critical skill for survival and self-sufficiency on the frontier. Early settlers were able to make rope from a variety of materials, but the main thing they used was hemp.

A rapid growing plant, hemp is perfect for making rope. Hemp grows fast. It produces up to 75 tons of dry matter per acre per year. It thrives in poor soil, needs no fertilizers or pesticides to succeed, and gobbles up atmospheric CO2, stymieing the greenhouse effect. It produces more fibre per pound than either cotton or flax, and these fibres are easily extracted in order to make hemp rope, twine, or cord.

Hemp rope is easy to make. Some methods involve using a rope machine, but fortunately such an investment isn’t necessary to the process. All you really need is some hemp fibre or hemp twine, and a short piece of wooden dowel. Our hemp rope maker, available in our shop, will really streamline the process for you if you plan on making lots of hemp rope.

Step one: Separate the hemp fibres or unwind the hemp yarn and cut into lengths approximately twice as long as the desired length of the rope. Continue cutting until you have a bundle of fibres approximately half the size of the diameter of rope you’d like to make.

Step two: Grab the bundle of fibres and fold it in half, securing the fold by placing a dowel rod through the resultant loop and into the ground. Smooth the fibres of this bundle down by running your hand along the length of the cord.

Step three: Divide the bundle in two, holding half the fibres in your left hand and half the fibres in your right.

Step four: Twist each bundle clockwise until the cord you are creating begins to kink and loop. Pull as hard as you can while twisting.

Step five: Twist the two cords together, wrapping one over the other in a counter clockwise motion, to form a rope.

Step six: Secure the ends with overhand knots beginning with the end in your hands. Once the first end is tightly tied, slip the rope off the dowel rod and tie it as well.

To make a cable, repeat steps 2 through 6 and twist the two ropes together. This process can be repeated as many times as you like, making thicker, stronger cables as you go.

Enjoy making your own hemp rope! This technique can be used to make hemp twine, hemp cord. and hemp yarn as well. It all depends on the size of the fibres you start with. Need some ideas for what to do with your newly made hemp rope? Try using a piece as a clothesline, for air-drying your clothes. Make a hemp leash for your pet, or keep your hemp twine petite for use in jewellery making.

Making rope is a great way to be self-sufficient and eliminate the supply chain requirement. Everything you can make yourself is one less packaged product– in this case, one less coil of synthetic rope– that needs to be manufactured for you. Have fun!

10 days ago

Chasing glory at the Olympics@RYMAN

Ryman Healthcare Limited

We may be an official partner of the New Zealand Olympic Team, but within our villages it’s residents who are chasing Olympic glory.
So many Ryman residents have passions and pastimes that they continue to thrive at within our villages. Therefore, creating an event like Olympics@RYMAN is a prime… View more
We may be an official partner of the New Zealand Olympic Team, but within our villages it’s residents who are chasing Olympic glory.
So many Ryman residents have passions and pastimes that they continue to thrive at within our villages. Therefore, creating an event like Olympics@RYMAN is a prime example of how we pioneer the way for our residents.
Events include swimming, bowls, cycling, relay walking and Quiznastics. To up the ante, we’ve incorporated technology solutions to enhance events and to enable residents to connect with all 41 Ryman villages, including those across the Tasman, while they compete!
Learn more

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11 days ago

A perfect match with free recruitment service

Competenz

"We’d been trying to recruit a young person for a couple of years", says Stainless Machinings owner Brian Lawry. “We’d been in touch with local high schools to arrange work experience at our precision component business and liaised with many career advisors and even advertised at … View more"We’d been trying to recruit a young person for a couple of years", says Stainless Machinings owner Brian Lawry. “We’d been in touch with local high schools to arrange work experience at our precision component business and liaised with many career advisors and even advertised at Manukau Institute of Technology (MIT), but with no success.”

After years of searching for a new recruit for their business, Auckland engineering firm Stainless Machinings turned to Competenz’s free job matching service to find them an ideal candidate.
In the space of a few short months, school leaver Stuart Martin joined the company.

Read the full story at the link below.
If you are an employer looking for the right apprentice for your business, get in touch with us to make use of our free job matching service

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