235 Devon Street East
New Plymouth
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100 days ago

🐇🐇Easter tip:🐇🐇

New Plymouth Veterinary Group

Did you know that Hot Cross Buns can be toxic to dogs?
Check out our latest Small Animal Newsletter for more about Easter hazards. Also, find out about our upcoming School Holiday Competition, who's our Instagram superstar and learn about our staff!
www.npvet.co.nz...
👉Subscribe to our … View more
Did you know that Hot Cross Buns can be toxic to dogs?
Check out our latest Small Animal Newsletter for more about Easter hazards. Also, find out about our upcoming School Holiday Competition, who's our Instagram superstar and learn about our staff!
www.npvet.co.nz...
👉Subscribe to our regular newsletter on our website!

npvet.co.nz/news/small-animal-newsletter-april-2019/

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110 days ago

Spore Counts - Update

New Plymouth Veterinary Group

Here are the most recent Spore Counts for the week ending 25th March 2019. As you can see we seen some major spikes, particularly in the Carrington Road Road up to 1040,000! If you need any advice on Spore Counts give the clinic a call on (06) 758 4006.

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123 days ago

Lily Poisoning in Cats

New Plymouth Veterinary Group

We all love the aroma of fresh flowers and often a beautiful lily is the centerpiece of an arrangement. But did you know that the lily family of flowers is EXTREMELY TOXIC to the feline members of your family?
Lilies can be lethal to cats. For more information check out our website: … View more
We all love the aroma of fresh flowers and often a beautiful lily is the centerpiece of an arrangement. But did you know that the lily family of flowers is EXTREMELY TOXIC to the feline members of your family?
Lilies can be lethal to cats. For more information check out our website: www.npvet.co.nz...

npvet.co.nz/news/lily-poisoning-in-cats/

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125 days ago

Spore Counts - Attn Lifestyle Block Owner / Farmers

New Plymouth Veterinary Group

Here are the most recent Spore Counts for the week ending 11th March 2019. As you can see we seen a major spike in the Victoria Road Area up to 330,000. If you need any advice on Spore Counts feel free to give the clinic a call on (06) 7584006.

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131 days ago

Spore Counts - Attn Farmers / Lifestyle Block Owners

New Plymouth Veterinary Group

Please see below the Spore Count readings for New Plymouth from 04.03.19. We will be updating this for you on Neighbourly on a weekly basis. If you are concerned about your stock, please feel free to contact the clinic on (06) 7584006.

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138 days ago

SPORE COUNTS - Attn Lifestyle Block owners and Farmers

New Plymouth Veterinary Group

Please see below the Spore Count readings for New Plymouth from 25.02.19. We will be updating this for you on Neighbourly on a weekly basis. If you are concerned about your stock, please feel free to contact the clinic on (06) 7584006.

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145 days ago

SPORE COUNTS for week 18.02.19

New Plymouth Veterinary Group

Please see below the Spore Count readings for New Plymouth from 18.02.19. We will be updating this for you on Neighbourly on a weekly basis. If you are concerned about your stock, please feel free to contact the clinic on (06) 7584006.

FACIAL ECZEMA - What is it?

Facial eczema (FE) is a disease … View more
Please see below the Spore Count readings for New Plymouth from 18.02.19. We will be updating this for you on Neighbourly on a weekly basis. If you are concerned about your stock, please feel free to contact the clinic on (06) 7584006.

FACIAL ECZEMA - What is it?

Facial eczema (FE) is a disease of grazing ruminants and camelids. It is caused via liver damage by a toxin produced in a fungal spore that grows in the dead “litter” at the pasture base.

The ideal growing conditions are warm and damp with high humidity – often following a dry spell. If you see mushrooms growing it is ideal FE conditions.

The toxin damages the liver so that is can no longer metabolise correctly resulting in a build-up of chlorophyll in the blood (the green colour in grass). This chlorophyll reacts with sunlight to cause a deep-seated sunburn that results in the characteristic eczema signs.

Signs to look for

- a drop in milk production

- cows are restless, seeking shade and lick their udder

- exposed unpigmented or thin skin reddens, thickens and peels

Not all animals affected with facial eczema show physical signs (i.e. clinical FE) although liver damage (i.e. subclinical FE) has occurred. It is estimated that for every clinical case there will be 10 cows with subclinical facial eczema.

Prevention

There is no cure for facial eczema, so prevention is the only way of protecting animals. To be effective, preventative measures need to be in place before eczema spores are found.

Preventative measures include monitoring pasture spore count and either dosing animals with zinc or spraying pastures with a fungicide

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156 days ago

ATTN: Farmers& Lifestyle Block Owners - WEEKLY SPORE COUNTS

New Plymouth Veterinary Group

Please see below the Spore Count readings for New Plymouth from 11.02.19. We will be updating this for you on Neighbourly on a weekly basis. If you are concerned about your stock, please feel free to contact the clinic on (06) 7584006.

FACIAL ECZEMA - What is it?

Facial eczema (FE) is a disease … View more
Please see below the Spore Count readings for New Plymouth from 11.02.19. We will be updating this for you on Neighbourly on a weekly basis. If you are concerned about your stock, please feel free to contact the clinic on (06) 7584006.

FACIAL ECZEMA - What is it?

Facial eczema (FE) is a disease of grazing ruminants and camelids. It is caused via liver damage by a toxin produced in a fungal spore that grows in the dead “litter” at the pasture base.

The ideal growing conditions are warm and damp with high humidity – often following a dry spell. If you see mushrooms growing it is ideal FE conditions.

The toxin damages the liver so that is can no longer metabolise correctly resulting in a build-up of chlorophyll in the blood (the green colour in grass). This chlorophyll reacts with sunlight to cause a deep-seated sunburn that results in the characteristic eczema signs.

Signs to look for
- a drop in milk production
- cows are restless, seeking shade and lick their udder
- exposed unpigmented or thin skin reddens, thickens and peels

Not all animals affected with facial eczema show physical signs (i.e. clinical FE) although liver damage (i.e. subclinical FE) has occurred. It is estimated that for every clinical case there will be 10 cows with subclinical facial eczema.

Prevention
There is no cure for facial eczema, so prevention is the only way of protecting animals. To be effective, preventative measures need to be in place before eczema spores are found.

Preventative measures include monitoring pasture spore count and either dosing animals with zinc or spraying pastures with a fungicide.

npvet.co.nz/farm-animals/check-spore-counts/

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164 days ago

Attn: Lifestyle Block Owners & Farmers SPORE COUNTS for week ending 04.02.19

New Plymouth Veterinary Group

Please see below the Spore Count readings for New Plymouth from 04.02.19. We will be updating this for you on Neighbourly on a weekly basis. If you are concerned about your stock, please feel free to contact the clinic on (06) 7584006.


FACIAL ECZEMA - What is it?
Facial eczema (FE) is a disease … View more
Please see below the Spore Count readings for New Plymouth from 04.02.19. We will be updating this for you on Neighbourly on a weekly basis. If you are concerned about your stock, please feel free to contact the clinic on (06) 7584006.


FACIAL ECZEMA - What is it?
Facial eczema (FE) is a disease of grazing ruminants and camelids. It is caused via liver damage by a toxin produced in a fungal spore that grows in the dead “litter” at the pasture base.

The ideal growing conditions are warm and damp with high humidity – often following a dry spell. If you see mushrooms growing it is ideal FE conditions.

The toxin damages the liver so that is can no longer metabolise correctly resulting in a build-up of chlorophyll in the blood (the green colour in grass). This chlorophyll reacts with sunlight to cause a deep-seated sunburn that results in the characteristic eczema signs.

Signs to look for
- a drop in milk production
- cows are restless, seeking shade and lick their udder
- exposed unpigmented or thin skin reddens, thickens and peels

Not all animals affected with facial eczema show physical signs (i.e. clinical FE) although liver damage (i.e. subclinical FE) has occurred. It is estimated that for every clinical case there will be 10 cows with subclinical facial eczema.

Prevention

There is no cure for facial eczema, so prevention is the only way of protecting animals. To be effective, preventative measures need to be in place before eczema spores are found.

Preventative measures include monitoring pasture spore count and either dosing animals with zinc or spraying pastures with a fungicide.

npvet.co.nz/farm-animals/check-spore-counts/

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172 days ago

Attn: Lifestyle Block Owners / Farmers _ SPORE COUNTS 28.01.19

New Plymouth Veterinary Group

Please see below the Spore Count readings for New Plymouth from 28.01.09. As you will see a big spike in the Carrington Road Area.
We will be updating this for you on Neighbourly on a weekly basis. If you are concerned about your stock, please feel free to contact the clinic on (06) 7584006.

View more
Please see below the Spore Count readings for New Plymouth from 28.01.09. As you will see a big spike in the Carrington Road Area.
We will be updating this for you on Neighbourly on a weekly basis. If you are concerned about your stock, please feel free to contact the clinic on (06) 7584006.

FACIAL ECZEMA - What is it?

Facial eczema (FE) is a disease of grazing ruminants and camelids. It is caused via liver damage by a toxin produced in a fungal spore that grows in the dead “litter” at the pasture base.

The ideal growing conditions are warm and damp with high humidity – often following a dry spell. If you see mushrooms growing it is ideal FE conditions.

The toxin damages the liver so that is can no longer metabolise correctly resulting in a build-up of chlorophyll in the blood (the green colour in grass). This chlorophyll reacts with sunlight to cause a deep-seated sunburn that results in the characteristic eczema signs.

Signs to look for
- a drop in milk production
- cows are restless, seeking shade and lick their udder
- exposed unpigmented or thin skin reddens, thickens and peels

Not all animals affected with facial eczema show physical signs (i.e. clinical FE) although liver damage (i.e. subclinical FE) has occurred. It is estimated that for every clinical case there will be 10 cows with subclinical facial eczema.

Prevention
There is no cure for facial eczema, so prevention is the only way of protecting animals. To be effective, preventative measures need to be in place before eczema spores are found.

Preventative measures include monitoring pasture spore count and either dosing animals with zinc or spraying pastures with a fungicide.

npvet.co.nz/farm-animals/check-spore-counts/

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178 days ago

Attn: Lifestyle Block Owners / Farmers ***Spore Counts***

New Plymouth Veterinary Group

Please see below the Spore Count readings for New Plymouth from 21.1.19. We will be updating this for you on Neighbourly on a weekly basis. If you are concerned about your stock, please feel free to contact the clinic on (06) 7584006.

FACIAL ECZEMA - What is it?
Facial eczema (FE) is a disease of … View more
Please see below the Spore Count readings for New Plymouth from 21.1.19. We will be updating this for you on Neighbourly on a weekly basis. If you are concerned about your stock, please feel free to contact the clinic on (06) 7584006.

FACIAL ECZEMA - What is it?
Facial eczema (FE) is a disease of grazing ruminants and camelids. It is caused via liver damage by a toxin produced in a fungal spore that grows in the dead “litter” at the pasture base.
The ideal growing conditions are warm and damp with high humidity – often following a dry spell. If you see mushrooms growing it is ideal FE conditions.
The toxin damages the liver so that is can no longer metabolise correctly resulting in a build-up of chlorophyll in the blood (the green colour in grass). This chlorophyll reacts with sunlight to cause a deep-seated sunburn that results in the characteristic eczema signs.

Signs to look for

- a drop in milk production
- cows are restless, seeking shade and lick their udder
- exposed unpigmented or thin skin reddens, thickens and peels

Not all animals affected with facial eczema show physical signs (i.e. clinical FE) although liver damage (i.e. subclinical FE) has occurred. It is estimated that for every clinical case there will be 10 cows with subclinical facial eczema.

Prevention

There is no cure for facial eczema, so prevention is the only way of protecting animals. To be effective, preventative measures need to be in place before eczema spores are found.

Preventative measures include monitoring pasture spore count and either dosing animals with zinc or spraying pastures with a fungicide.

npvet.co.nz/farm-animals/check-spore-counts/

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411 days ago

Free Canine Mobility Clinic

New Plymouth Veterinary Group

We care about your dogs' wellbeing and know that as they start to enter their 'senior' years they can start developing mobility issues. Our new Canine Mobility Clinic is ideal for any dog heading towards senior years (over 7) and who may be starting to show signs of slowing down or … View moreWe care about your dogs' wellbeing and know that as they start to enter their 'senior' years they can start developing mobility issues. Our new Canine Mobility Clinic is ideal for any dog heading towards senior years (over 7) and who may be starting to show signs of slowing down or general stiffness. For more information check out our website www.npvet.co.nz...

npvet.co.nz/pets/pet-services/canine-mobility-clinic/

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502 days ago

Do you have a pet rabbit? Do you know about RHDV1-K5?

New Plymouth Veterinary Group

Pet rabbits in New Zealand have been living with the risk of disease since the rabbit calicivirus was illegally released in 1997. The new strain set to be released in Autumn 2018 is just as deadly to pet rabbits as the existing strain. However, there may be an increase in cases among the wild … View morePet rabbits in New Zealand have been living with the risk of disease since the rabbit calicivirus was illegally released in 1997. The new strain set to be released in Autumn 2018 is just as deadly to pet rabbits as the existing strain. However, there may be an increase in cases among the wild rabbit population therefore increasing the possibility of exposure of the virus to pet rabbits.

Pet owners should ensure that they continue to take all available measures to protect their pet rabbits, particularly in areas that are close to populations of wild rabbits.

What can be done to protect pet rabbits against RHDV1-K5?
The Cylap vaccine does not have a label claim to protect against the K5 (new) RCD virus. However, a small trial showed it did protect. Vet Group's advice to rabbit owners is to vaccinate rabbits at 8 to 10 weeks, then at 14 to 16 wks, then every 12 months after the initial course. This should in most cases protect against the new RCD strain.

We also recommend the following biosecurity measures for pet rabbit owners:

• Control insects (especially flies and fleas) as much as possible
both indoors and outdoors. Flies are the main vector through
which the virus is spread.
• Remove uneaten food on a daily basis.
• Keep your pet rabbit indoors where possible.
• Rabbit-proof your backyard to prevent access by wild rabbits
• Regularly decontaminate equipment and materials (e.g. cages,
hutches, bowls) with either 10% bleach or 10% sodium
hydroxide. 10 minutes' contact time is required, then rinse off.
• Limit contact with and handling of unfamiliar pet rabbits.
• Use good biosecurity measures (e.g. wash hands, shoes,
clothing) after handling other people’s rabbits.
• Avoid cutting grass and feeding it to your rabbits if there is the
risk of contamination from wild rabbits

Source: NZVA

Please feel free to contact the clinic if you have any questions regarding the above or would like to book your rabbit in for a vaccination.

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523 days ago

NEW WEBSITE

New Plymouth Veterinary Group

We are excited to share with you that we have a new and improved website. Head over to www.npvet.co.nz... where you can meet the staff, book routine appointments and order repeat prescriptions for your furry friends.

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537 days ago

UPDATE: PARVOVIRUS IN NEW PLYMOUTH

New Plymouth Veterinary Group

We would like to inform you that we are still seeing clinical cases of Parvovirus on a daily basis. We have had over 12 cases in the last two weeks. A common thread is they are either puppies who have not been vaccinated or adult dogs who are not up to date with their parvovirus vaccines.

We … View more
We would like to inform you that we are still seeing clinical cases of Parvovirus on a daily basis. We have had over 12 cases in the last two weeks. A common thread is they are either puppies who have not been vaccinated or adult dogs who are not up to date with their parvovirus vaccines.

We urge you talk to your vet and check your dog's vaccination status. If you have a new puppy our recommendation is to vaccinate again parvovirus as soon as possible. Please be vigilant about where you take the puppy until the vaccination course has been completed.

If you think your dog may have parvovirus remember it is highly infectious so if you come to the clinic, please carry your dog, or leave your dog in the car and let reception know when you arrive. Do not take your dog to ANY public places.

(Follow our facebook page @NPVetgroup for more updates)

From the team @ NP Vet Group

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