24 days ago

Make it all add up!

Nisaar Goga from First Class Accounts Botany

Contact us for your free 1 hour business consultation

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54 days ago

Improving Your Work/Life Balance

Nisaar Goga from First Class Accounts Botany

It sounds clear and actually quite simple - balancing work life and personal life should be something everyone is capable of doing, right?

In reality, the work-life balance is an intense and personal process, one that each business owner must define in their own life.

Even when considering the … View more
It sounds clear and actually quite simple - balancing work life and personal life should be something everyone is capable of doing, right?

In reality, the work-life balance is an intense and personal process, one that each business owner must define in their own life.

Even when considering the personal nature of the work-life balance, there are some general tips everyone can employ when seeking the illustrious state of balance.

The process begins by setting boundaries. Determine the time you will leave the office each day; then stick with it, regardless of what arises throughout the day. Set your outgoing message on the weekends so your clients know you will not be taking calls or answering emails until Monday morning. You can also note a time each evening in which you will no longer be available.

The key to these boundaries is they must be realistic. The goal here is longevity in both business and life; and in order to keep yourself motivated and committed - your boundaries should be built into your daily routine seamlessly, reducing stress, not introducing more.

Next, you must understand your own expectations. More specifically, you may need to lower your expectations! You cannot and will never be able to do it all; once you realise this, you can move forward successfully.

Utilise calendars and colour coding for work, family and personal time – this will provide a clear view of where you are spending the majority of your time and then you can organise your schedule according to your priorities. Create daily, weekly and monthly to-do lists to accompany the calendars and keep you on track.

Remember to schedule breaks and actually take them - short breaks during the day as well as time on the weekends dedicated solely to family and personal time. Always take your holidays!

Build flexibility into your plans. Studies show those who are given the freedom to work when and where they need to will be more productive. Even the best to-do lists and schedules can be turned upside down by unpredictability. To stay balanced, you need flexibility.

Lastly, create your personal version of success. By listing the things you want to achieve both at work and in your personal life you can be successful in both places. List your desires, define why you want them, and then determine how to achieve them.

Monitor these goals regularly to find out where you might be lacking the focus needed, and then you can redirect your time and energy toward success.

Work-life balance isn’t about finding a way of completely separating the two – it is about allowing them to intertwine and complement one another. Discovering what will work for you personally will increase productivity and reduce stress, both at home and at work.

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60 days ago

Hitting The Sweet Spot

Nisaar Goga from First Class Accounts Botany

You might think you have the perfect product to tempt your customers but are you certain your perceptions align with theirs?

Failure to find your customer’s sweet spot may simply render your product out of date and out of touch.



A rare box of 120 year-old chocolates from the Boer War was for … View more
You might think you have the perfect product to tempt your customers but are you certain your perceptions align with theirs?

Failure to find your customer’s sweet spot may simply render your product out of date and out of touch.



A rare box of 120 year-old chocolates from the Boer War was for sale recently on Trade Me and attracted quite a lot of attention. But the asking price and viewers’ comments provide food for thought about the importance of making sure your value perceptions match those of your customers.



The tin gift box dating from 1900 with New Year’s greetings from Queen Victoria holds a certain value for collectors of Boer War memorabilia. But the fact that it still contains the six original uneaten chocolate bars adds enormously to the interest this item is generating.



Initially, the vendor was very confident in the value of this auction and asked upwards of $2,000.



But the auction has had no bites, and as one person said, "$2000 is a hell of a lot". Such comments about the exorbitant price tag have forced the vendor to lower their expectations to around $800.



Part of the problem here was that rancid fat and sugar bloom makes the chocolate inedible. And who wants to buy a 120 year-old product that is not fit for purpose?



This raises some really important points about value perceptions. In simple terms, if you want your product to be relevant you need to understand where your customers’ sweet spot is and how you can add value to that.



It’s very easy to have a distorted view of the value your product offers to the market. You know the enormous amount of time, effort and resources that have gone into the research, design, pricing, sales and marketing of your product. And so you’re rightly proud of what you have achieved.



But this same intense involvement can blind you to changing customer tastes, the value your competitors offer and any flaws in your own value perceptions. The harsh reality is that what was considered valuable 1 year or even 6 months ago may no longer be valued.



It may be that customers’ perceptions have changed. It could be that a competitor is offering a lot more value for the same price. A drop in perceived value might be due to the use of non recyclable packaging or increased awareness of a labour issue some other seemingly unrelated aspect.



Such a volatile market requires you to always be on your toes. You need to constantly review, and ask; does my product add value to my consumers’ lives?

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95 days ago

DIY SEO

Nisaar Goga from First Class Accounts Botany

Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) sounds complex, but with a few simple tricks, you’ll find yourself climbing the search results.

Here are just a few of the best ways to get that boost for free.

Watch Your Words

One of the most overlooked problems are the keywords themselves. Don’t try to be … View more
Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) sounds complex, but with a few simple tricks, you’ll find yourself climbing the search results.

Here are just a few of the best ways to get that boost for free.

Watch Your Words

One of the most overlooked problems are the keywords themselves. Don’t try to be the number one hit for “socks” because there is no way. You could be high on the list for “men’s business socks” or something more specific. Once you have a few phrases that work, try a combination that represents the strongest part of your business.

Be Consistent

The best keywords aren’t going to get you very far if you aren’t updating the site. Chances are, you can’t redesign your site regularly. You aren’t making new products every week. Having promotions year in and out is ridiculous.

You can, however, blog. Your webhost probably has one and you can generate some interesting content on your own. At first, blog weekly. If you are successful, try it daily. The activity on your site helps Google and similar search engines rank you higher.

Keep It Pithy

When it comes to item descriptions and URLs, the shorter the better. For item descriptions and comments, try to keep it under 50 words with all the pertinent details.

This can be especially hard for some products, but you may be able to find a different header for special information or specific dimensions.

Likewise, you don’t want to have every step of the site in your URL. For example me.com/clothing/mens/underwears/socks/business/search.aspx is not as good as me.com/socks. Google and other engines can really penalise you for a long URL.

Stick to these 3 simple rules and you can get yourself to the top of the search results by the end of the week. Just remember this is a journey, not a destination.

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99 days ago

Changing Your Customer’s Opinions

Nisaar Goga from First Class Accounts Botany

The former managing director for Facebook Australia & New Zealand has some very strong opinions about how social media and modern communication technology is changing the way people form their opinions.

The question is are you up to speed with how your customers form opinions about your brand?… View more
The former managing director for Facebook Australia & New Zealand has some very strong opinions about how social media and modern communication technology is changing the way people form their opinions.

The question is are you up to speed with how your customers form opinions about your brand?

Stephen Scheeler, the former managing director of Facebook Australia and New Zealand, points out that “we have entered an era where technology in good and not so good ways is impacting how humans do lots of different things and one is how they form opinions."

Stephen has concerns about how rapidly technology has transformed the way people build and change their opinions. He feels strongly that the accelerated changes are so great that even an insider with his experience cannot fully understand what is happening.

And although he is specifically referring to the way social media may have influenced the recent Australian elections, these concerns hold true for understanding your consumers and how they form opinions about your brand. What does this mean for your organisation?

The first thing to realise is that you can’t leave your head in the sand. The advertising world is rapidly changing and you need to get onboard with that. If you think that your advertising approach from even 5 years ago is up to date then you need to revisit the way you market your brand.

Targeted advertising is taking a larger share of audience than ever before so you need to know who your audience is in much greater segmentation detail than ever before. You can no longer assume the average grocery buyer is a mum with two children for example.

You also need to know how your consumer interacts and communicates with their community. As Ariadne Vromen, professor of political sociology at the University of Sydney, points out, social media “can be used to shore up your base, delivering messages to them as you know other forms of traditional advertising aren’t working”.

Ariadne adds that it isn’t only the young but older people who are using Facebook to verify opinions and establish trust in products and organisations. Social media is a powerful tool that has transformed the way your customers modify their opinions and you need to ensure you’re using it appropriately for your customer base.

Finally, you, as a business owner, need to invest more in your data collection and analysis tools. Build an expert marketing team and create an holistic approach to your advertising that talks to your consumers where and when they’re listening.

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100 days ago

Mind Your Language

Nisaar Goga from First Class Accounts Botany

Kiwibank is doing away with cheques from 2020 despite the fact that Kiwis still write some 18 million cheques a year. The language used by Kiwibank CEO, Steve Jurkovich, to announce this major change is causing a great deal of concern and even offence among a segment of Kiwibank customers.

So, … View more
Kiwibank is doing away with cheques from 2020 despite the fact that Kiwis still write some 18 million cheques a year. The language used by Kiwibank CEO, Steve Jurkovich, to announce this major change is causing a great deal of concern and even offence among a segment of Kiwibank customers.

So, what can you do to get your PR and communications challenges right when announcing major organisational changes?



Steve Jurkovich may be correct when he describes cheques as "’sunset technology’ providing a ‘shrinking service’ requiring ‘outdated’ technology that is ‘coming to the end of its useful life’" . But this is potentially offensive language for the large proportion of cheque users who are elderly. Furthermore, many of these customers are extremely vulnerable and may already be dealing with discrimination, elder abuse and the challenges of isolation and lack of mobility.



Kiwibank proposes sending out ‘personal letters’ and providing ‘tech teas’ where cheque users can learn about modern technology at their local branch. That is of course assuming that elderly customers have a computer or Smartphone and that getting to their branch isn’t a problem and that their community still has a local branch.



Kiwibank risks alienating not just the elderly but their families who will be forced to find other ways to help elderly family members make those essential daily financial transactions. Here are some steps you can follow that will help smooth any transition.



First, successful PR requires you to think about what your decisions will mean for all affected parties. Put yourself in their shoes and if you don’t know how your customers or employees think or anything about their lives you need to find out before you make major changes.



CEO Steve Jurkovich asked his 70 something year old mother what she thought of Kiwibank cancelling cheques and she was fine about it. But a survey of one person (and that person being your proud mother ) does not make a solid base for good PR communications.



Secondly, if you’re still convinced the changes are necessary for the overall health of your organisation then you need to think about how you communicate the coming changes.



Put yourself in the affected parties’ shoes and ask yourself, how will they perceive my communication? Can I ease the communication with a better choice of wording? What other steps can I take to make the transition easier for them?



Kiwibank promotes itself as a community bank for Kiwis with the aim of helping them to financial independence. With its latest announcement Kiwibank risks alienating a large number of its more vulnerable customers. Such a poorly executed PR campaign could potentially spell cheque-mate for a brand that relies on its community friendly approach.

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122 days ago

First Class Accounts Botany

Nisaar Goga from First Class Accounts Botany

Call us to provide a free diagnostic review of your business and let us help you improve your business performance !!

Call 027 5766 728 or email admin@fcabotany.co.nz

169 days ago

First Class Accounts Botany

Nisaar Goga from First Class Accounts Botany

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We provide you with the tools to make your business more profitable and more cash flow positive – creating wealth for all owners.
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177 days ago

Free Business Check Up

Nisaar Goga from First Class Accounts Botany

Contact Nisaar today for a no obligation free business health check on 027 576 6728 or email Nisaar@fcabotany.co.nz

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