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    We are industry specialists in removing mould and mildew from curtains, drapes & blinds.

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1 day ago

Mouldy linings? We can clean that!

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean (The Curtain Store)

Sharing some more before and after photos of font and back fabric of a mouldy curtain. These levels of mould are more common than you think. As you can see we sometimes need to take the curtain hem down to get it properly clean, which we sew back up before returning to you.

8 days ago

How to Get Rid of Cockroaches

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean (The Curtain Store)

Cockroaches are an extremely common household pest throughout all of New Zealand and although they make you shudder when you see them, they thankfully do not pose many health risks, however they can transmit diseases, so it is best to keep them out of your home. As with any pest the number one … View moreCockroaches are an extremely common household pest throughout all of New Zealand and although they make you shudder when you see them, they thankfully do not pose many health risks, however they can transmit diseases, so it is best to keep them out of your home. As with any pest the number one preventative measure is to keep your home and outside surrounding areas as clean as possible. We’ll talk through more information about the different types of cockroaches, how to prevent an infestation before it happens, and if needed how to kill cockroaches.

What are the 3 main types of cockroach?
Although there are thousands of different species of cockroach, here in New Zealand we tend to only deal with the following three culprits. They are all pests and have the potential to transmit diseases such as dysentery, salmonella and diarrhoea due to their eating habits. See below for more information on the pests most wanted list.

The Gisborne Cockroach
This is our native representative, although it was first introduced from Australia, they are usually not found in doors at all so if you spot one of these in your home, it was likely by accident such as being carried in through timber and firewood.

They commonly live outdoors in damp dark areas and feed on decaying forest matter, so if you happen to spot one of these, it might be worth just giving a helping hand to get it back outside again.

The American Cockroach
This is the most common species found in New Zealand and is known as a pest throughout the world. Despite the name this species is native to Africa and the Middle East. They have adapted very well to human living spaces as they prefer moist areas with warmer temperatures.

Classified as omnivores, they will eat many foods as well as materials including leather, beer, glue and book bindings. They have the potential to cause sickness in humans, from their odorous secretions and bacteria that they pick up and deposit on food and surface areas and so it is very important to keep your house as clean as possible.

The German Cockroach
Although the smallest of the cockroach species found in New Zealand, they are actually the biggest problem. They do not like cold temperatures to a point where they struggle to survive and so they will always look to go inside of buildings for warmth. They more commonly prefer restaurants, food processing facilities and hotels to residential.


They are defined as omnivore scavengers, meaning they eat everything the American Cockroach does as well as meats, starches, sugars and fatty foods.


Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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24 days ago

Protecting your home from fires

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean (The Curtain Store)

1. Check your smoke alarms
Smoke alarms provide an early warning in case of a fire inside your home. Traditional alarms beep when they detect smoke or fire, while smart detectors also send an alert to your phone. There should be a smoke detector in every room in your house except bathrooms, for … View more
1. Check your smoke alarms
Smoke alarms provide an early warning in case of a fire inside your home. Traditional alarms beep when they detect smoke or fire, while smart detectors also send an alert to your phone. There should be a smoke detector in every room in your house except bathrooms, for maximum protection. You also need one in the hallway between the living area and bedrooms.
Crucially, you are highly advised to test your smoke alarms at least once a year to ensure they still work. You are four times more likely to die in a house fire without a functioning smoke alarm!

2. Get a fire extinguisher
Having a fire extinguisher handy can make the difference between a small kitchen mishap that was successfully contained, and the house literally burning down. There are different types of fire extinguisher, classified according to the kind of fire they’re designed to tackle. Make sure you are aware of what the differences are and how to use each one in an emergency situation. A typical home extinguisher should have an ABC rating:
• Class A – combustibles such as wood, paper, cloth, rubber, household rubbish, most plastics
• Class B – flammable liquids, solvents, oil, petrol, paints and lacquers
• Class C – gases including methane, propane, hydrogen, acetylene and natural gas
• Class D – combustible metals including magnesium and aluminium swarf
• Class E – Electrical fires
• Class F – chip pan fires, as an alternative to a fire blanket

3. Create a fire stopping landscape
A fire originating from outside, such as a wildfire, is best thwarted by preventing it from reaching your house in the first place. You can use landscape gardening design to slow down or stop the spread of fire towards your home, by adhering to these tips:
• Use hard landscaping such as concrete, stone or gravel around the house
• Clear any dry vegetation from around the home, particularly in the summer
• Use fire resistant plants such as lavender and honeysuckle for soft landscaping, and spread them out, to slow down fire and stop it from spreading
• Keep outdoor plants well watered during the summer months. Lush green planting is less likely to burn.

4. Use fire retardant materials
Let’s start with building materials; some are more vulnerable to fire than others. Using fire retardant alternatives and fireproofing your interiors are good first lines of defence against a potentially serious tragedy. Make the changes when you are refurbishing or redecorating your home. The Building.govt.nz website has a comprehensive list of everything you can do to help prevention of fire occurring. Designing for fire can also be designing for sustainability which is without a doubt a win-win!

When it comes to materials, concrete panels, stucco or brick for exterior walls, steel framing for windows and concrete or metal for roofing are all good choices. Fire retardant paint is also a good idea. For decking, concrete, tiles, stone or brick are better than wood.

Inside your home, choose fire resistant curtains and upholstery fabrics. Additional flameproofing can also be administered to your existing home fabrics and upholstered furniture in situ. Curtain Clean can service your existing upholstery anywhere in the country. Call us on 0800 579 0501 for prices and to find out more.

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30 days ago

The Dangers of Dirty Curtains

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean (The Curtain Store)

Curtains are a great way to really complete the look of a room in your home. They can add a sense of personality and lift up the atmosphere of your home without spending a fortune on redecorating. Most people tend to forget about their curtains when cleaning other home interior accessories, such as… View moreCurtains are a great way to really complete the look of a room in your home. They can add a sense of personality and lift up the atmosphere of your home without spending a fortune on redecorating. Most people tend to forget about their curtains when cleaning other home interior accessories, such as carpets. Little did you know, curtains can cause serious harm to your health if left unattended for long periods of time.

1. CURTAINS ACCUMULATE ALLERGENS AND DUST MITES

Curtain fabrics can often attract a lot of allergens and dust. These are the two main causes of allergic reactions such as sneezing, coughing or runny noses. Due to their small size, they are easily carried by wind and accumulate on curtains after some time, especially curtains that are made from cotton. Some curtains are worse offenders when it comes to dust accumulation, particularly those made from thicker fabrics and multiple curtain layers in one. Allergens and dust mites are trapped between the layers and thus increase the chances of getting allergy symptoms. Removing the allergens hidden in your curtains can already help relieve allergy symptoms a lot without the help of meds.

2. MOULD AND MILDEW
Moulds can develop and grow in curtains, and they are most likely to thrive in a dirty curtain. Mould growth is something that can’t be ignored, and immediate curtain cleaning should happen since it can cause potentially dangerous health problems and puts everyone in the home or commercial space at risk.

Some moulds can trigger asthma and other bronchial or respiratory issues. Most images are susceptible to disinfectants found in individual cleaning solutions, aside from many other possible diseases or health conditions.


It’s best to seek the help of professional curtain cleaners since formulations must be based on the kind of material your curtain was made from. The overall quality and craftsmanship deserve to be well-cared for with the right cleaning products and techniques.

3. GERMS

Germs are one of the main causes of sickness in both humans and pets. What most people don’t know is that they love attaching themselves to curtains (mainly those that are hung in dark areas).

4. DUST AND TOXINS

Curtains in all homes can collect dust and toxins quickly. Mainly if the curtain material is thick and lined. Does one of your family members at home suffer from regular asthma attacks or bronchitis? If your answer is yes, then the cause is probably hiding in your curtains.


CONCLUSION: CLEAN YOUR CURTAINS PERIODICALLYYour drapes may play an important role in enhancing the overall ambiance of your home. Proper maintenance of curtains becomes absolutely essential if you want to have a healthy indoor environment for yourself and your family.

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34 days ago

SPF your house over summer

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean (The Curtain Store)

When those super hot summer days and nights eventually come around, all you will want is a safe haven to save you from the heat. These are a few steps you can take to stay cool when the weather heats up.

• Make sure your ceilings are insulated - insulation can help keep out the suns heat
•… View more
When those super hot summer days and nights eventually come around, all you will want is a safe haven to save you from the heat. These are a few steps you can take to stay cool when the weather heats up.

• Make sure your ceilings are insulated - insulation can help keep out the suns heat
• Set your ceiling fans to rotate anti-clockwise.
• Turn your fans around, face them towards an open window so they can blow the hot air out of the house. Fill a mixing bowl with ice (or something equally cold, like an ice pack), and position it at an angle in front of a large fan so the air whips off the ice in an extra-chilled, extra-misty state. Trust us: It’s magic.
• If you have a heat pump, try out the fan-only or dehumidifier options to cool your house. They use less power than air conditioning and are still effective.
• Keep the windows open overnight and then close them in the morning to try and hold in the cold air.
• Install safety catches on your windows so you can leave them open all day, even when you're out.
• Close blinds or curtains to keep sunlight out during the hottest hours of the day, especially on windows that get direct sun. Some blinds are designed to let you see out, but still block most of the direct UV rays. As simple as this tip may seem, closing your curtains and blinds essentially prevents your home from becoming a miniature greenhouse.
• Turn off unnecessary lights and electrical appliances – this reduces a home's heat load.
• When cooking, keep windows open, put lids on saucepans and use an extractor fan to reduce steam and heat.
• Ventilate – keep doors or windows open at opposite ends of the house to create a through-draught, or cross ventilation.
• Closing off unused rooms will prevent cool air from permeating these areas during the hottest part of the day. You’ll want to capitalize on the cooler night hours, too, letting air flow naturally through your home.
• Start the barbie - It’s obvious, but we’re going to say it anyway: using your oven or stove in the summer will make your house hotter. If it already feels like 50 degrees in your home, the last thing you want to do is turn on an oven.
• Make a few long-term improvements - you can make a couple changes to your home that will keep it cooler for seasons to come. Insulated window films, for example, are a smart purchase as they work similarly to blinds. And additions like awnings and planting trees or vines near light-facing windows will shield your home from the sun’s rays, reduce the amount of heat your home absorbs and make your investment even more worthwhile.

Hopefully these were of some use to you, and if you have anything to add or any comments please do below!

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41 days ago

Stain Removal Guide

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean (The Curtain Store)

Be gone, stain! Don’t you wish you had a magic wand to wave over stubborn stains?


Our printable Stain Removal Guide provides step by step instructions for handling all types of stains.
Simply find your type of stain and match the numbers with each removal method, in order, for the best … View more
Be gone, stain! Don’t you wish you had a magic wand to wave over stubborn stains?


Our printable Stain Removal Guide provides step by step instructions for handling all types of stains.
Simply find your type of stain and match the numbers with each removal method, in order, for the best results. Print it out and stick it to your laundry wall!


Printable copy: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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44 days ago

Sound Absorption

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean (The Curtain Store)

That tiny crack that runs around your door transmits more sound than you would know.

Noise is a daily occurrence that we all endure to a certain degree from noisy kettles, screaming children, loud TVs and the deafening thud of a bass. There’s sometimes little peace in ones day. Ongoing … View more
That tiny crack that runs around your door transmits more sound than you would know.

Noise is a daily occurrence that we all endure to a certain degree from noisy kettles, screaming children, loud TVs and the deafening thud of a bass. There’s sometimes little peace in ones day. Ongoing excessive noise is not only aggravating it can actually be harmful to your ears and has a significant impact on the way our spaces work in the home.


When it comes to residential design, the acoustics, (the way in which the structural characteristics of a space relate to how well sound can be heard) although a key design feature, are rarely considered during the building process and sometimes only tackled during a renovation.


Soundwaves seep through doors, windows, ceilings and cracks, so how do you reduce unwanted sound from affecting your day to day activities?


Hard flat surfaces tend to bounce sound waves around, sometimes creating a lasting echo effect if the surfaces are parallel walls. The softer and less uniform the surface, the less opportunity sound has to bounce off. Textiles, including drapery and upholstered furniture and furnishings not only deliver a design aesthetic they also play a significant role in the absorption of sound.


However not all textiles have equal sound absorption qualities however. The level of sound absorption is dependent upon a textile’s weight, composition, and/or construction. Generally (due to the large vertical mass) drapery provides the main textile source of sound absorption however, there are several other ways to achieve this.


Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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47 days ago

New Zealand Summer Colour Forecast 2021

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean (The Curtain Store)

As global colour trends evolve, our unique New Zealand landscapes compel a reinvestigation into how colour is interpreted in our homes and lifestyles. Three homegrown brands have collaborated to provide insight into how top colour trends for 2021 are interpreted within the New Zealand lifestyle and… View moreAs global colour trends evolve, our unique New Zealand landscapes compel a reinvestigation into how colour is interpreted in our homes and lifestyles. Three homegrown brands have collaborated to provide insight into how top colour trends for 2021 are interpreted within the New Zealand lifestyle and design ethos.

“A rolling organic shape that defies seating, hand crafted with the use of modern machinery to create furniture on a global scale.”


New Zealand designed and manufactured, the Harper Chair by David Shaw is the canvas upon which these colour trends are explored. Made to order at their design house in Christchurch, the Harper chair draws its inspiration from the natural lines of our landscapes. Its organic shape emulating the natural movements and shapes of New Zealands beloved coastal regions and mountains. Constructed from sustainable timbers, the Harper chair holds the colours and texture of the Vintage Deux by Mokum velvet fabric beautifully, reflecting the truest essence of the colours in question.

“Colour trends inspired by our New Zealand landscapes, bringing calm and comfort.”


While nature itself has long been a common inspiration for home décor, in New Zealand this is particularly true as we are heavily influenced by our diverse and striking surroundings. Globally trending colours, blues, greens and blacks are epitomised in our unique tonal variations that can be found in our native forests, extensive coastlines and high country landscapes.


Read the rest: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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50 days ago

Care Labelling

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean (The Curtain Store)

It is mandatory under the Consumer Information Standards (Care Labelling) Regulations 2000 for many new textile goods supplied in New Zealand to comply with specific sections of the Standard AS/NZS 1957:1998 Textiles – Care labelling.

The purpose of the care labelling consumer information … View more
It is mandatory under the Consumer Information Standards (Care Labelling) Regulations 2000 for many new textile goods supplied in New Zealand to comply with specific sections of the Standard AS/NZS 1957:1998 Textiles – Care labelling.

The purpose of the care labelling consumer information standard is to make sure that:
• consumers are aware of the method and cost of caring for textile products when they are buying them
• a cleaner can confidently use the information to take care of the textiles
• the textile’s life is not shortened by inappropriate care information or no information

• the textile is not damaged or destroyed by inappropriate care.

It is illegal to supply textile goods that do not comply with this standard and the regulations.

The regulations set out the types of textile goods covered by the standard and what parts of the standard apply to New Zealand.


The standard sets out the words, terms and symbols to use on a label to show the correct way to care for textile goods, including dry-cleaning and washing.


The regulations are issued under section 27 of the Fair Trading Act 1986.

Who do the regulations apply to?

Any person supplying, offering to supply or advertising the supply of new textiles, that require care labelling information, must comply with the regulations. Any person includes retailers, importers, distributors and manufacturers.


Types of supply include textile goods for sale in a shop, on internet auction sites, at markets or stalls or in craft shops.

What textile items have to be labelled with care information?
The care labelling standard contains more details and requirements, some of which are very technical. You should read both the regulations and the standard to make sure you understand all the labelling requirements.
Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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52 days ago

Why you DON'T put curtains in the washing machine

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean (The Curtain Store)

Recently we have been taking care of (fixing) curtains that have been put in the washing machine. There are a number of reasons why this is a terrible idea.

Firstly, we take many measures to ensure your curtains get as clean as possible without shrinkage or colour loss. Recently we have had to … View more
Recently we have been taking care of (fixing) curtains that have been put in the washing machine. There are a number of reasons why this is a terrible idea.

Firstly, we take many measures to ensure your curtains get as clean as possible without shrinkage or colour loss. Recently we have had to re-wash curtains that have been washed but there is still traces of mould or live mould left on the curtain. We take careful steps to ensure this is eliminated as much as possible on the curtain fabric, and can always remove it from linings. These results are simply unable to be duplicated in a home environment.

Spray on curtain cleaning products contain sodium hypochlorite, aka bleach. If you use products to remove mould, it can result in colour loss. This is one of the more common problems we have seen. We test all fabric before cleaning to be sure of what cleaners can be used with it.


Washing curtains in the washing machine can result in other damage – curtains need to be handled with care, especially older fabrics. It is expensive getting a curtain re-lined due to rips – we take extra care in preventing this from happening.


In addition to the above – most of the time, they will come out of the machine wrinkly and look terrible, no matter the fabric type. Our service ensures they look great and ‘like new’ as they can when returned to you (and of course, fresh and clean).

Don’t make the same mistake, call us (the experts) instead.

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63 days ago

Removing mould from curtains

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean (The Curtain Store)

Linings and bottom of curtains are a common place for black mould to grow. Don't be alarmed - it means that the curtains are doing their job! It can, however, be difficult to remove. Time and time again we've helped customers who nearly had to throw their curtains out as they think it is … View moreLinings and bottom of curtains are a common place for black mould to grow. Don't be alarmed - it means that the curtains are doing their job! It can, however, be difficult to remove. Time and time again we've helped customers who nearly had to throw their curtains out as they think it is un-fixable, or, attempted to remove it themselves and shrunk or wrinkled their gorgeous drapes. Remember - we can help with that! We've been in this business for over 20 years and are experts at removing mould. If your curtains look like these, call us!!

64 days ago

Luxurious Lotus Silk

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean (The Curtain Store)

Lotus fibre or lotus silk is a rather rare and exclusive fibre. The silk comes from the stem of the lotus flower which is made up of microfibres.


The stems are snapped off, the fibres are teased out before being rolled into thread. Once the threads are dry, they are weighed down and carefully… View more
Lotus fibre or lotus silk is a rather rare and exclusive fibre. The silk comes from the stem of the lotus flower which is made up of microfibres.


The stems are snapped off, the fibres are teased out before being rolled into thread. Once the threads are dry, they are weighed down and carefully wound by hand. Then they’re put onto the loom. These fibres are fragile, but once woven, can be as durable as traditional silk.


The entire process of fibre extraction, weaving the fibre, and making the fabric is completely handmade, making the process time-consuming. This also limits the quantity of the fabric produced. A large scarf requires the thread of around 9,200 stems and would take one worker around two months to complete. This is why it is considered luxurious and items made from lotus silk do not go cheap.

The resulting material resembles raw silk or an aged linen, naturally beige in colour and possesses unique qualities. It is waterproof, practically wrinkle proof, washable, lightweight, sweatproof and is soft to the touch.

Most importantly, its key quality is that it is one of the most eco-friendly materials on the planet. The lotus is a water plant. It preserves the eco-system in which it grows including the water as much as the surrounding wildlife.

Not only is it created from waste (lotus stems), but it also leaves little waste behind. In fact, lotus silk been identified as potentially the most ecological fabric in the world, and it is the first natural microfibre in the world. Being a natural fibre, it is biodegradable after its useful life.

68 days ago

Plastic Bottle Planters

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean (The Curtain Store)

Here is a fun and easy way to reuse a plastic bottle! These are the basic instructions for creating a plastic bottle planter. Creative fun for the kids and recycling those plastic bottles? We call that a win-win.
They look adorable with succulents (cactus or herbs would also work) and chances are … View more
Here is a fun and easy way to reuse a plastic bottle! These are the basic instructions for creating a plastic bottle planter. Creative fun for the kids and recycling those plastic bottles? We call that a win-win.
They look adorable with succulents (cactus or herbs would also work) and chances are the planters will last for a while.

You’ll need:
• Plastic bottles
• Sharpie
• Acrylic paint & brushes
• Pencil (for sketching details)
• Scissors


1. Use the sharpie to mark out the shape of your animal on the bottle.
2. With scissors roughly cut out your shapes. After the top of the bottle is removed go back around and clean up the edges. Wipe clean (make sure bottle is clean and dry).3. Paint the bottle with chosen shade of acrylic paint, this will take several coats. Tip: use a hair dryer to speed drying between coats. Spray paint made for plastic can be used if you already have a can at home.
4. Once dry, use the pencil to sketch the eyes, mouth, and other details, and paint over with your desired colours.
5. Fill with soil and your favourite succulents. These also make cute containers to keep anything in (pencils, food, toys, beads) as well as colourful décor for your kids’ room.


We hope you enjoyed our tutorial and if you make a one we would love to see a picture!

www.curtainclean.co.nz...

71 days ago

Wool is 100% Biodegradable

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean (The Curtain Store)

HOW DOES WOOL BIODEGRADE?
All materials of animal and vegetable origin have some degree of biodegradability, meaning that they are capable of being decomposed by the action of living organisms, such as fungi and bacteria. Wool is composed of the natural protein keratin, which is similar to the … View more
HOW DOES WOOL BIODEGRADE?
All materials of animal and vegetable origin have some degree of biodegradability, meaning that they are capable of being decomposed by the action of living organisms, such as fungi and bacteria. Wool is composed of the natural protein keratin, which is similar to the protein that makes up human hair. When keratin is broken down naturally by microorganisms, the products do not pose any environmental hazard.

WOOL READILY BIODEGRADES IN MOIST, WARM CONDITIONS
On disposal, if wool is kept warm and moist or buried in soil, fungal and bacterial growths develop which produce enzymes that digest wool. On the other hand, thanks to the unique chemical structure of keratin and wool’s tough, water-repellent outer membrane, clean and dry wool fibres do not readily degrade. This allows wool products to be resilient and long-lasting in normal conditions.

WOOL BIODEGRADES QUICKLY
Wool biodegrades readily in as little as three to four months but the rate varies with soil, climate and wool characteristics. This releases essential elements such as nitrogen, sulphur and magnesium back to the soil, able to be taken up by growing plants. Some studies found more rapid degradation after only four weeks’ burial in soils. Research has shown that processing treatments such as dyeing and anti-shrink treatment can affect the rate of biodegradation in soil, causing an increase in the initial resistance of wool fabric to degradation. However, this is a short-term effect, typically not persisting beyond eight weeks.

WOOL RETURNS ESSENTIAL NUTRIENTS TO THE SOIL
On burial in soil, wool becomes a slow-release fertiliser providing nutrients for uptake and growth by other organisms. Some have even used wool fertiliser to foster herb and vegetable growth. This is known as natural closed loop recycling; restoring the initial inputs of soil and grass. Other beneficial effects of adding wool to soils include enhanced water holding capacity, improved water infiltration, soil aeration and reduced erosion. Ground-up wool carpet, when used as a fertiliser, increased the dry matter yield of grass growth by 24% to 82%.

WOOL DOES NOT ADD TO LANDFILL VOLUMES OR MICROFIBRE POLLUTION
Natural fibres biodegrade naturally in a relatively short period in soils and aquatic systems and therefore do not accumulate in landfill and oceans. Results from a University of Canterbury study demonstrate that wool degrades in a marine environment. In contrast, synthetic textiles persist for many decades and can disintegrate to small fragments. Commonly known as microplastics, or microfibres when less than 5mm in diameter, these fragments accumulate in aquatic environments and land disposal sites where they have negative effects on ecosystems when consumed by organisms. A single polyester fleece garment can produce more than 1900 fibres per wash. Ingestion has a negative impact on organisms, sometimes causing death through starvation as plastic replaces food in the stomach. Once in the food chain, microplastics potentially also affect human health via seafood consumption.



At Curtain Clean we are all about minimising waste and reducing the amount of uncompostable materials going into landfill. Keep in mind that a lot of fabrics can be washed and don't need to be thrown away! Call us on 07 579 0501 if you have something you'd like cleaned, we can treat almost all fabrics.

74 days ago

Maintaining your Curtains after Cleaning

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean (The Curtain Store)

Keep your newly revived curtains looking fresher for as long as possible with our tips!

Minimise the food sources that encourage mould growth
• Clean soft furnishings regularly according to the manufacturer's instructions. This usually involves a regular light vacuum, with less frequent … View more
Keep your newly revived curtains looking fresher for as long as possible with our tips!

Minimise the food sources that encourage mould growth
• Clean soft furnishings regularly according to the manufacturer's instructions. This usually involves a regular light vacuum, with less frequent dry cleaning or laundering.
• Regularly clean windows and wipe down window surrounds and venetian blinds or shutters with a mild detergent in warm water.
• Consider selecting window coverings manufactured from man-made materials, particularly in damp areas such as the bathroom, kitchen and on south facing windows.

Minimise moisture in your home
• Use lids on pots and pans when cooking.
• Never hang clothes to dry inside and vent your clothes drier to the outside.
• Keep your roof, cladding and guttering in good repair.
• Check that stormwater is being discharged to an appropriate outlet.
• Check plumbing for leaks.
• Replace any unflued gas heaters with flued gas or electric heaters.
• Avoid bringing wet clothes or shoes into your home.

Ventilate your home to reduce moisture build-up in the air
• Open north facing doors and windows when you are home during the day, even during the colder months.
• Use exhaust fans in areas where water vapour is created (e.g. the kitchen and bathroom).
• If all else fails, consider a heat recovery ventilation system to replace stale damp air with fresh air.

Maintain an even inside temperature throughout your home to prevent moist air from condensing onto cold areas like windows
• Insulate ceilings, floors and, where possible, walls.
• Improve the insulative properties of your windows by closing your curtains/blinds as soon as the sun goes down each day.
• Replace any thin or unlined window coverings with quality thermal or lined curtains or roman blinds.
• Fit your curtains or blinds as close to the wall as possible to trap air against the window and take your curtains all the way to the floor to prevent air circulating out from under the curtain
• If you are planning any home renovations, consider upgrading joinery to double glazing or installing a retrofitted secondary glazing.

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