• Products and Services
  • Curtain Clean

    Curtain clean specializes in cleaning all types of curtains, Roman blinds, Duet blinds and others.

    Take in or pickup Service

    Curtains can be taken into our agent Rotorua Chemdry or they can take down and renstall

    Local agent.

    Rotorua Chemdry.
    6 View Road, Mangakakahi, Rotorua 3010

    Door to door Courier

    We can arrange to have them picked up and returned to you by courier. see website for details.

    Reairs & Alterations.

    We can repair your curtains, replace the linings, add an extra lining and alter the curtains.

    Roller Bling Cleaning.

    We clean roller blinds and can cut them down when you replace your windows with double glazing.

    Roman Blind Cleaning

    We can clean and repair your roman blinds. We can also change the blind to a roller rails system.

    Duet, verasol,nightnday .

    We can clean and repair duet blinds, verasol blinds and night n day shades.

    Fire Retarding Fabrics

    Many curtain materials are flameable . We can Treat them with flame resistant solution.See website.

    Need more Info?

    see our website; www.curtainclean.co.nz
    Chat available during office hours.

  • Be Happy
  • Happiness is Clean, Fresh curtains.

  • Share
5 days ago

For the Love of Velvet

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Rotorua

For anyone wanting to add everlasting interest to their home, you can’t look past velvet! This is a fabric that’s as rich in textile history as it is in texture with incredible durability that may surprise you.

Velvet fabric fuses a historical sense of luxury and indulgence with a plush, … View more
For anyone wanting to add everlasting interest to their home, you can’t look past velvet! This is a fabric that’s as rich in textile history as it is in texture with incredible durability that may surprise you.

Velvet fabric fuses a historical sense of luxury and indulgence with a plush, practical comfort that has a timeless style, sure to outlast any momentary design trends. With its silky sheen and rich colours, velvet holds a specific seductive quality that no eye for elegance can resist the allure of.

For a fabric that feels like a soft, buttery hug the unique piles have a hard-wearing quality that will ensure your velvet curtains, cushions or furniture will continue to be loud and daring or subtly sophisticated for years to come.

History of Velvet
The history of velvet is one of luxury and meticulous construction. It is believed the material was first introduced in Baghdad around 750 A.D. The original velvet material was made from silk and therefore naturally reserved for royalty and other notably wealthy classes that could afford the exorbitant cost.

Velvet eventually travelled to Europe on the Silk Road and gained popularity during the Renaissance. At the same time, new loom technology lowered the production costs and therefore widened the availability to fabric lovers of all classes. Fast-forward to the 21st century and velvet fabric can be found in almost every home, transcending and outlasting interior trends to suit any home decor for years on end.

How is Velvet Made?
Velvet is made in a very unique way. It is woven on a double piece loom that makes two pieces of fabric simultaneously with the velvet pile encased in the middle. It is then separated, creating the three-dimensional texture velvet is known for.

While the first velvets were made from silk, more recent adaptations in the production process means velvets can now be made from natural or synthetic fibres such as polyester, nylon, viscose, or rayon.

Classic plain velvet will then be sheared to ensure the pile is a consistent length and often brushed while moist to achieve a nice uniform grain across the fabric. If the fabric is destined to boast a pattern, at this point in the process it will be crushed, embossed or snipped to different lengths to ensure this pattern is part of the pile’s identity for the life of the fabric.

Velvet is then dyed to produce amazing, rich colours that are accentuated by the three-dimensional texture.

Durability of Velvet
Due to the aura of luxury surrounding velvet and the fact that it was originally made from silk, there’s a preconception that it’s delicate and requires gentle, loving care to stay pristine. We’re here to set the record straight!

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

Image
11 days ago

How to Care for Your Washing Machine

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Rotorua

Looking after your washing machine will maximise its life and performance.
Our member surveys indicate that the average life expectancy of a top loader is seven years, and 12 for a front loader. A little care and maintenance can go a long way, so here are some tips to help you get the most from … View more
Looking after your washing machine will maximise its life and performance.
Our member surveys indicate that the average life expectancy of a top loader is seven years, and 12 for a front loader. A little care and maintenance can go a long way, so here are some tips to help you get the most from your washer.

Watch out for keys and coins
Keys and coins kill washing machines. Check pockets before washing, and look for dirt and objects left in the drum, or hidden in the rubber seals after each wash.

Check your pump filter
Many washing machines have these as a last line of defence against foreign objects. Look for a small hatch low down on the outside of your machine. Check this monthly and clear anything that shouldn’t be in there — use a towel or tray to catch the water when you open it up. If your machine isn’t draining, this is the first thing to check before calling for a repair.

Limit your washer's spin speed
Keep this to 1200rpm, even if your machine goes up to 1400 or even 1600rpm. Higher speeds reduce the life of belts, drum bearings and door seals, without removing much more water.

Don’t use fabric softener with laundry detergent
Fabric softeners react to create a waxy residue called “scrud”. No one wants “scrud” – especially as it clings to unseen parts of the machine, such as under the agitator. If blobs break free, they can leave greasy marks on laundry.

Regularly clean the detergent dispenser
Check the manual to see how to remove it, and wash it thoroughly in warm soapy water.

Clean the door seal
Remove water from the door seal after each wash (if you notice mould, wipe the rubber seal with hot water and detergent). Between washes, leave the door and detergent dispenser open – that lets the interior dry.

Use the service cycle
Many machines have a specific “service” or “cleaning” cycle. It helps your machine smell fresh, prevents detergent build-up, and keeps it cleaning at its best.

If your machine doesn’t have a service cycle, run a hot wash with a full-strength powder detergent once a month.
Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

18 days ago

How To Maintain and Care for Your Wallcoverings

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Rotorua

So, you’ve finally chosen that fabulous wallpaper to showcase your interior style but how do you best look after it to keep it looking fresh and clean?

Many a foreign object can flick onto the surface of the wallpapers in your home, ranging from food to crayon to fly spray, and like any … View more
So, you’ve finally chosen that fabulous wallpaper to showcase your interior style but how do you best look after it to keep it looking fresh and clean?

Many a foreign object can flick onto the surface of the wallpapers in your home, ranging from food to crayon to fly spray, and like any textile, wallpapers need a little bit of love every now and then. A regular wipe down with a clean cloth should keep dust and marks at bay, however, there are times when there may be the need for a deeper clean.

To better understand how to care for your wallcoverings we need to first discuss the different types of wallpapers on the market and their cleaning durability. The main three classifications are:

1. Scrubbable
Generally heavy vinyl’s, these types of wallcoverings are suited to higher trafficc areas as they can withstand scrubbing to remove stains and dirt more effectively.

2. Washable
Coated papers (light weight vinyl) would fall into this category, a mild detergent and water can be used to occasionally wipe surface of wallcovering. They are unsuitable for high traffic areas due to light cleaning and inability to remove stains or contaminants without damage.

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

Image
23 days ago

Natures Bounty | Bast is Best

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Rotorua

Commonly known as ‘soft’ fibres, bast fibres are the fine, flexible fibres obtained from the stems of dicotyledonous plants.

Bast fibres have been used to manufacture ropes, sacks, sails, and other industrial fabrics for hundreds of years. Commonly known as ‘soft’ fibres, bast fibres are… View more
Commonly known as ‘soft’ fibres, bast fibres are the fine, flexible fibres obtained from the stems of dicotyledonous plants.

Bast fibres have been used to manufacture ropes, sacks, sails, and other industrial fabrics for hundreds of years. Commonly known as ‘soft’ fibres, bast fibres are the fine, flexible fibres obtained from the stems of dicotyledonous plants. A sustainable choice, bast fibres support regenerative agricultural practices that can help the soil sequester carbon and as a natural resource, are entirely biodegradable. In this article we will investigate four of the most utilised bast fibres: flax, hemp, ramie, and jute.

Between the epidermis (the outermost layer of cells) and the core of the plant’s stems are soft, woody fibre bundles or strands which can be over one metre long. The strands are composed of individual filaments made up of cellulose and hemicellulose cells bonded together by pectin or lignin, a cohesive gum which strengthens the stem of the plant.

During harvest the stems are cut close to the ground and the fibres are separated either through a natural decomposition process called retting (engaging moisture and bacteria to rot away the gummy cellular tissues) or by decortication (peeling the stems manually or mechanically). After retting, the fibres can be mechanically extracted through a process known as scutching.

In contrast to bast fibres, leaf fibres are obtained from the leaves of monocotyledonous plants with parallel-veined leaves, such as grasses, lilies, orchids, and palms. The long, stiff fibres of plants including abaca, cantala, Mauritius hemp, and sisal are generally used to create cordage or ropes, however, due to labour-intensive harvesting processes they are used less frequently than synthetic options.

Flax (Linen): Famously grown across northern France, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Ireland, flax is the most popular and strongest of the bast fibres. Wild flax fibres found in the Upper Palaeolithic layers of a Georgian cave indicate that humans have been crafting cords and weaving flax baskets for over 30,000 years.

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

26 days ago

Ways to make your home feel cosier in Winter

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Rotorua

Find out how a few key elements can warm up your abode over the winter months. Anyone can make a home that is inviting and relaxing after a long cold day.

Choose a warm paint colour: Explore the colour wheel - Notice that yellows, oranges and reds are on the warm side so utilising those colours … View more
Find out how a few key elements can warm up your abode over the winter months. Anyone can make a home that is inviting and relaxing after a long cold day.

Choose a warm paint colour: Explore the colour wheel - Notice that yellows, oranges and reds are on the warm side so utilising those colours will simulate a cosier, warmer mood. Blue and purples are on the cool side so they will simulate the opposite mood.

Warm lighting: Group lighting by using task and ambience lighting and a mixture of table and floor lamps. Warm coloured bulbs throw out a softer light and give a room a cosy feel.

TIP: Having your lights on separate switches means you can control how bright/dim a space will be.

Add pot plants: Any living element contributes to a cosy and inviting feel. Plants in baskets are not only on-trend, but they also generate more oxygen inside your home too.

TIP: Group pots together using different shapes and heights to make a focal point.

Carpet, rugs and textiles: Tiles are great but can be chilly underfoot in the cooler months. Carpets insulate, soften and warm up a room and New Zealand wool carpets are environmentally friendly with a sustainable fibre, plus naturally flame retardant.

Don’t discount rugs even if you have carpets. Make sure you choose a rug that works with your existing carpet. Placing a rug between yourself and the floor instantly guarantees a warmer atmosphere. Rugs are also incredibly good at tying a space together.

TIP: Garage carpet reforms the space from a cold concrete feel to a soft warm space too!

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

Image
32 days ago

Curtain & Blind Safety in Your Kids Bedroom

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Rotorua

As a parent or parent-to-be, your number one focus will be the health and safety of your kids. In fact, it doesn’t matter whether they are 18 months or 18 years, we always have their best interests in mind – even if they don’t listen anymore!

However, the home environment can present many … View more
As a parent or parent-to-be, your number one focus will be the health and safety of your kids. In fact, it doesn’t matter whether they are 18 months or 18 years, we always have their best interests in mind – even if they don’t listen anymore!

However, the home environment can present many dangers to young children. Take curtains and blinds, for example. Although they look great in a room, there’s a risk that kids can hurt themselves if they play around with them.

As such, what are the measures that you can take to ensure that they are safe in your home? Let us explain.

Keep your windows child-safe: Keep babies’ cots well away from windows and ensure that all blind and curtain cords are out of reach. This may mean not placing furniture next to windows – toddlers love climbing!

Child safety devices: You could install a safety device that adds another level of protection. This allows cords to be tightly wound around a cleat and out of reach, alternatively you could opt for electronically operated blinds.

Reduce the hazard: It is important to be aware at all times of child safety around the home. An extra safety measure is the installation of a safety device that either removes the cord loop or limits access to cords. A tension device (either a chain tensioner or cleat) can be anchored to the wall or floor so that young children cannot play with cords or put them around their neck.

Selecting the right curtain fabric type: There is no doubt that kids love to pull and tug on items around your home. While you can tell them off as many times as you like, it might be a good idea to invest in stronger fabric type for curtains in a kid’s bedroom.

For example, sheers and voiles – while they look great in a baby’s nursery, these fabrics are too lightweight and prone to damage especially when your youngest becomes mobile and wants to practice their climbing skills! In a kid’s bedroom, you’ll want a strong fabric that can take the odd pull and is also easy to clean should they get dirty.

If you need help, give us a call on 0800 579 0501 and we can offer helpful advice. We can also provide safety devices to keep your blind cords out of reach.

Image
37 days ago

DIY Double Glazing with Insulation Film

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Rotorua

Window insulation film works on the same principle as standard double glazing by creating a layer of still air in front of the glass that acts as insulation. DIY window insulation kits consist of clear plastic film for attaching to wooden window sashes or frames using double-sided adhesive tape. … View moreWindow insulation film works on the same principle as standard double glazing by creating a layer of still air in front of the glass that acts as insulation. DIY window insulation kits consist of clear plastic film for attaching to wooden window sashes or frames using double-sided adhesive tape. They cost a fraction of the price of double glazing yet offer good performance in reducing heat loss and condensation in your home, as well as preventing your sills and window dressings from going mouldy. You can pick up a kit from your local Mitre 10 or Bunnings.

Window insulation film is only designed to last one season, but it may remain intact for several years if your windows are in good condition and the film is undisturbed. Just be aware that adhesive tape used on the film may leave a stain if you leave it on for longer than one season.

Tips for installing
Installing DIY window insulation film is relatively easy – you only need a pair of scissors and a hair dryer.
• Make sure your window frames are dry and the paint is in good condition to avoid condensation forming inside the air gap.
• For wooden windows, applying a bead of sealant like silicone along the glass edge will further reduce the risk of moisture creeping into the air gap.
• Make sure your window pane is clean and streak free before putting the insulation up.

Step 1: Clean the Window
Clean the window thoroughly with an ammonia-based window cleaner and wipe it dry using a squeegee. Make sure that all of the window cleaner is wiped off, as it will dissolve the adhesive on the window film.

Step 2: Wet the glass with a light spray of water and baby shampoo
Fill a spray bottle with water and add a couple of drops of baby shampoo. Spray the mixture onto the window. This mixture helps the film stick to the window but still lets you slide the film around so you can fit it properly into the corners before the mixture dries.

Step 3: Measure and trim the film to size
Measure the window to see how large an area you need to cover, allowing at least two centimetres overlap for all four sides. Roll the window film out onto a flat horizontal surface and trim to size. Before you put the film on the window, start peeling the backing off the sticky side of the film. Use masking tape on both sides of one corner to get the peeling started.

Step 4: Put the window film onto the window
Once you’ve peeled off the top five to ten centimetres of backing, move the film up to the surface of the window. Start by putting the top two corners in place. Once the film is sitting in a good position you can slowly start to take the rest of the backing off.

Step 5: Remove the backing from window film as you go
Slowly peel the backing off in stages. Use a squeegee to flatten the film out onto the window as you go. Start the squeegee in the centre of the window and push out to the edges. As you work down the window, use the spray bottle to keep the surface as moist as possible. It will give you a much smoother finish.

Step 6: Remove the air bubbles from the window film
Once the squeegee has got the larger bubbles out, use the small plastic scraper to remove any smaller bubbles. You can work out any small pockets of water at the same time. Whatever small amounts of moisture are left will work with the adhesive on the film to create a bond to the window.

Step 7: Give the window film a final trim
When all the bubbles are out, take a sharp blade and give the film a final trim at the edges of the window. Once you’ve trimmed the edges, give the film one final scrape with the small plastic scraper. Tuck the corners in as hard as you can, squeegeeing towards the outside, working out the last remnants of water.

Remember Curtain Clean can help with those mouldy curtains, give us a call on 0800 579 0501 to find your local shop.

We would love to see or hear about your finished projects if you give them a try, please get in touch and let us know!

Image
39 days ago

Are You Installing Double Glazing in Your Existing Window Spaces?

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Rotorua

Often when installing double glazing in the existing window spaces you can end up with blinds that no longer fit within the window frame. Usually by around 30mm.

If you have either Roller Blinds or Faux Wood Venetian blinds, they can be shortened to fit the new frame. Here at Curtain Clean we … View more
Often when installing double glazing in the existing window spaces you can end up with blinds that no longer fit within the window frame. Usually by around 30mm.

If you have either Roller Blinds or Faux Wood Venetian blinds, they can be shortened to fit the new frame. Here at Curtain Clean we can do this for you.

We can either collect the blinds from your house or you can bring them into our workshop.

The information that we need is the measurement between each side of the window.
As sometimes windows are not parallel, please measure this about 50 mm form the top of the frame. See diagram. Please write this down for us.

The cost to cut down each blind starts at $50.00 depending on the size of the blind.

We also can clean and repair your blind at the same time.

We can record your blind if needed and we can replace cord locks or tiler mechanisms should that be needed.

Replacement slats may be available for broken slats. (Depending on the availability of the slat material that matches.)

For more information please email Curtain Clean at; sales@curtaincleaning.co.nz or call Curtain Clean on 075790501 or 08005790501.

Image
52 days ago

Stop Your Curtains Getting Damp and Mouldy

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Rotorua

It’s time to bid farewell to summer for another year and start facing the reality that soon it’s going to be cold and damp for a while. As we enter those colder months and condensation appears on the windows, we thought it was a good time to share some tips on preventing mould and mildew … View moreIt’s time to bid farewell to summer for another year and start facing the reality that soon it’s going to be cold and damp for a while. As we enter those colder months and condensation appears on the windows, we thought it was a good time to share some tips on preventing mould and mildew growing on your curtains.

What makes mould and mildew grow?
Interestingly, it’s not directly the condensation on your windows that causes mould and mildew because most curtains don’t come into contact with it. Mould and mildew grow when there’s moisture and warmth in the home, which condensation does contribute to.

Just like everything absorbent in your home, as temperatures go up the moisture in the air evaporates and is absorbed into the fabric. As they cool, the moisture changes back from its gaseous state to being closer to its liquid form. In absorbing this moisture they also take in any bacteria it holds. Repeated over time, this is what causes the nasty growths.

The difference between mould and mildew
Mould is a broad term that encompasses multiple identical nuclei and can grow beneath and penetrate the surface of affected material. Mildew is a type of mould that grows on the surface and can therefore be much more easily treated/removed. When it’s live, moulds are orangey or reddish in colour. The black patches we see are actually the hibernating mould spores waiting for the sun to warm them up and bring them back to life.

Where does all this moisture come from?
We live in a pretty humid climate in New Zealand at the best of times; in some areas it’s even greater. But it’s not all weather related. Cooking, showering, drying clothes, unflued gas heaters and simply breathing and existing all produce moisture content within our homes.

Preventing moisture build up and/or drying out your home
• Install a home ventilation system of some kind.
• Crack the windows a little during the day to allow a bit of cool air to flow through your home. North facing windows are best.
• Get a dehumidifier. Emptying this once a day (or more!) will really open your eyes to how much moisture is in your home. Remember the science though, you need to warm the air (and thus the moisture in it) before the dehumidifier can suck it in and remove it.
• Pop a DampRid moisture absorber container on the windowsill behind the curtains.
• Install a ShowerDome and extractor fan in the bathroom.
• Make sure your clothes dryer is vented to the outside.
• Install a rangehood in the kitchen and use lids on pots and pans.
• Change the curtain rail brackets to 80 or 100mm so the curtains are further from the walls and the windows allowing for more air circulation. Bear in mind however, this will likely lower their thermal insulating capabilities.
• Invest in double-glazing. Although this does not prevent mildew it can work to slow the onset.
• Minimise what mould growth feeds on. Clean soft furnishings regularly, clean windows and wipe down window surrounds with warm soapy water.
Check plumbing for leaks.
• Maintaining an even inside temperature throughout the house helps stop moist air from condensing.
• Insulate well. Start with the ceilings and under floor as a priority, then the walls.
• Close curtains/blinds as soon as the sun goes down.

Don’t worry if it’s too late - Curtain Clean can treat and remove mould and mildew from your curtains. Call us on 0800 579 0501 or visit curtainclean.co.nz to find out more.

Image
60 days ago

How to Clean Your Washing Machine

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Rotorua

Dirt, mould, and other grimy residue can build up inside your washer over time. Learn how to clean a washing machine, including front-loading and top-loading machines, to get your laundry as clean as possible.
Your washing machine’s main job is to clean your clothes, but did you know you should … View more
Dirt, mould, and other grimy residue can build up inside your washer over time. Learn how to clean a washing machine, including front-loading and top-loading machines, to get your laundry as clean as possible.
Your washing machine’s main job is to clean your clothes, but did you know you should clean your washing machine at least once a month? With just a few supplies you can easily clean your washing machine to keep it looking and smelling like new.

The dirt that disappears from your clothes, towels, and sheets has to go somewhere, which means grime can build up inside your washing machine over time. Without regular cleaning, the appliance might also harbour leftover detergent, hard-water deposits, and mould or mildew around the lid. This can leave a residue on laundry or cause items to emerge from the wash with a funky smell. To ensure your freshly washed clothes and linens are as clean as possible, follow these steps on how to clean a washing machine once a month. These instructions work for cleaning front-loading and top-loading washing machines, but there are a few special considerations for both types.

If your washing machine has a self-clean function, choose that cycle and follow the manufacturer's instructions to clean the inside of the machine. Otherwise, you can use this simple, three-step process to eliminate build-up in washing machine hoses and pipes and ensure your clothes stay fresh and clean.

Step 1: Run a Hot Cycle with Vinegar
Run an empty, regular cycle on hot, using two cups of white vinegar instead of detergent. Add the vinegar to the detergent dispenser. (Don't worry about harming your machine, as white vinegar will not damage clothes.) The hot water-vinegar combo removes and prevents bacteria growth. Vinegar can also act as a deodorizer and cut through mildew odours.

Step 2: Scrub the Inside and Outside of the Washing Machine
In a bucket or nearby sink, mix about 1/4 cup vinegar with a quart of warm water. Use this mixture, plus a sponge and dedicated toothbrush, to clean the inside of the machine. Pay special attention to dispensers for fabric softener or soap, the inside of the door, and around the door opening. If your soap dispenser is removable, soak it in the vinegar water before scrubbing. Give the machine's exterior a wipe down, too.

Step 3: Run a Second Hot Cycle
Run one more empty, regular cycle on hot, without detergent or vinegar. If desired, add 1/2 cup baking soda to the drum to help clear away build-up loosened from the first cycle. After the cycle is complete, wipe out the inside of the drum with a microfiber cloth to remove any remaining residue.
Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

Image
65 days ago

How to Make Your Towels Feel New Again

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Rotorua

One of the best things about staying with my parents is the promise of soft, fluffy towels when I arrive. Compared to the rough, frequently damp variety I have at home, my mum’s towels feel like I'm being wrapped in clouds. When I ask her how she keeps her towels so fluffy, she replies, only… View moreOne of the best things about staying with my parents is the promise of soft, fluffy towels when I arrive. Compared to the rough, frequently damp variety I have at home, my mum’s towels feel like I'm being wrapped in clouds. When I ask her how she keeps her towels so fluffy, she replies, only half-joking, “I buy expensive towels.”

First, I read that the leading cause of stiff towels is often leftover detergent residue. However, while cutting back on detergent will prevent towels from growing scratchy, it may not revive the softness. Choosing a hot water cycle and washing loads of only towels are also recommended for maintaining fluff, but again may not be enough to bring it back from the dead.

Undeterred, I continued to scrounge around the internet, and eventually came across a few interesting tricks—using items that I already have lying around at home—that I decided to try. Not at all of them worked out, but here is what I discovered.

Add Baking Soda
What the internet says: Mix half a cup of baking soda along with a normal detergent dose for fluffier and cleaner towels. Baking soda also naturally eliminates musty and mildew smells that come from towels remaining damp for too long.
How it worked: The towel felt thicker and bouncier, but the threads were sharper and spikier—kind of like a buzz cut texture. Not entirely ideal.

Throw Tennis Balls in The Dryer
What the internet says: If you have a few clean, unused tennis balls lying around like I do, try throwing them in the dryer along with your towels. As the balls bounce around, they help remove lumps and increase softness.
How it worked: It didn’t. I noticed no difference in fluffiness from drying towels with tennis balls. My towels remained their same old scruffy selves.

Brush It Out
What the internet says: Use a hairbrush to brush your towel once it’s clean and dry, which will help break down any dried detergent residue and separate the threads from each other, making the towel softer to the touch.
Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

Image
75 days ago

The Importance of Curtains for a Healthy Home

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Rotorua

The Importance of Curtains for a Healthy Home
Curtains, blinds, or other effective window coverings are an essential way to ensure your home is healthy. Here’s why.

Curtains are good for insulation
Curtains reduce the amount of air exchange between a cold window and the rest of the room. … View more
The Importance of Curtains for a Healthy Home
Curtains, blinds, or other effective window coverings are an essential way to ensure your home is healthy. Here’s why.

Curtains are good for insulation
Curtains reduce the amount of air exchange between a cold window and the rest of the room. For keeping heat inside the home, high-quality curtains can reduce heat loss by around 40%. This means you will be less susceptible to illness in winter, and will save money on your heating bill.

The insulation efficiency of curtains depends on the fabric type (closed or open weave), colour and weight. Curtains also act as effective insulators to help keep your home cool in the warmer months.

Dust build-up and allergens
Curtains prevent allergens from getting into your rooms. When your windows are open, dust particles and pollen enter your home. Curtains act as a barrier and collect these particles. They also prevent moisture from condensation on windows entering your room at night.

Because curtains collect these particles, it is important to keep your curtains clean to prevent mould, dust and pollen build-up. Mould in particular will result in a less healthy home and is associated with several health problems.

Correct curtain installation matters for a healthy home
Curtains should completely cover the window and be as close to the window pane as possible, particularly if insulation or light-blocking are your priorities. This effectively ‘seals’ the room from heat, moisture and light exchange through windows.
Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

Image
81 days ago

The Green Side of Wool

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Rotorua

We have a soft spot for sheep. For many, sheep are symbolic to New Zealand culture with the rearing of sheep being the backbone of the economy for many years.

Sheep farming was established in New Zealand by the 1850s and for several decades wool accounted for more than one third of New … View more
We have a soft spot for sheep. For many, sheep are symbolic to New Zealand culture with the rearing of sheep being the backbone of the economy for many years.

Sheep farming was established in New Zealand by the 1850s and for several decades wool accounted for more than one third of New Zealand’s exports by value, with the sheep population peaking at just over 70 million in 1982.

This number is significant when compared to New Zealand’s human population of 5 million. By 2020 sheep numbers dropped to 26 million following a decline in profitability compared to other types of farming, particularly dairy.

While also farmed as a food source, today’s article focuses on sheep wool and its environmental attributes.

Wool is a natural and renewable resource and as long as our beloved sheep are eating our tasty green pastures they will always produce wool. Wool has amazing properties that make it ideal for many applications from home furnishings to underwear.

Cotton and synthetic fibres are currently the most commonly produced fibres globally, however, their performance and environmental benefits do not compare to wool.

From Wool to Yarn
The wool clip (the total yield of wool shorn during one season from the sheep) is sent to the scourers where it is cleaned and dried before being spun into yarn. The yarn is then sent to the textile manufacturer where many different processes are involved.

The yarn is wound onto dye cones to be dyed the required colours. Next the yarn is warped onto beams which are threaded through the loom, allowing the weft yarn to run across the warp and create a woven fabric.

The fabric is then inspected, washed, and dried. Very few chemicals are used in the processing, typically only water and heat.

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

Image
87 days ago

Window treatments to keep your home warm this winter

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Rotorua

Aren't you tired of sky-high winter power bills? Start with your windows to stop the cold from getting in.
BRANZ, an independent research organisation, says:

• 42% to 45% of heat in houses insulated to Pre-2007 requirements is lost through windows.
• If your home has been built or … View more
Aren't you tired of sky-high winter power bills? Start with your windows to stop the cold from getting in.
BRANZ, an independent research organisation, says:

• 42% to 45% of heat in houses insulated to Pre-2007 requirements is lost through windows.
• If your home has been built or renovated under the 2007 Building Code, which requires double glazing, you still lose up to 31% of heat through windows.
• Properly fitted curtains and blinds can cut heat loss through single glazed windows by 60% and double glazed windows by 40-50%.

Choosing the right window treatments will help insulate windows and prevent heat loss. Here are three options to answer your "how can I warm up my home?" this winter.

Honeycomb Blinds
Honeycomb blinds are one of the most energy-efficient window treatments. They are also known as honeycomb or cellular shades. These window coverings feature a honeycomb structure to make an air pocket between the window glass and the room that acts as an insulator, blocking heat and keeping the cold out.

When a heater is running, Honeycomb blinds reduce heat loss through windows by up to 60%, which equals around 10% savings on your heating energy. In hotter months, honeycomb blinds reduce unwanted heat from the sun through windows by up to 60% when installed with a tight fit. They are available in different layering options, including single and double-cell.

Heavy curtains or drapes
Drapes or curtains are another way to insulate your home by adding one extra barrier against the cold winter air. The main difference is that curtains are sized to fit the window, and drapes reach the floor.

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

94 days ago

Do Blackout Curtains Help With Sleep?

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Rotorua

Do you feel like there is too much light in your bedroom at night or in the morning? Too much light in your bedroom could be severely interfering with your sleep. Here’s how blackout curtains can help.

Why does light affect your sleep?
Light is one of the key signals for your circadian … View more
Do you feel like there is too much light in your bedroom at night or in the morning? Too much light in your bedroom could be severely interfering with your sleep. Here’s how blackout curtains can help.

Why does light affect your sleep?
Light is one of the key signals for your circadian rhythm. Your circadian rhythm is essentially your master ‘body clock’ that takes its cues from your general sleeping patterns, light exposure and temperature. This body clock starts facilitating the release of the sleep hormone melatonin about 2 hours before ‘bedtime’.

So, reducing your exposure to light at night time may help signal to your body that it’s time for bed and help you achieve a deeper sleep. This means you should be avoiding exposure to sunlight, reducing your screen time, and dimming the lights or lamps in your bedroom. Unless you live deeply rural, you will also need to find ways to reduce light from cars, streetlights and other homes entering your bedroom. That’s where blackout curtains come in.

What are blackout curtains?
Blackout curtain or lining fabric is made from dense, tightly woven materials that do not allow light through. Because the material is dense, blackout fabrics also have great insulation and noise-cancelling properties.

How blackout curtains help you get a better night’s sleep
When installed correctly, blackout curtains (or blackout curtain lining) almost completely stop external light entering your bedroom, and so contribute to an environment that allows a deeper sleep. They need to full cover the window frame for the blackout effect to work properly, so light doesn’t come through the sides. Blackout fabrics will also help reduce your energy bill and make it easier for you to control the temperature in your bedroom – another crucial factor for your circadian rhythm.

Blackout curtains will drastically improve sleep for night shift workers
If your job or lifestyle mean you need to get your rest during daylight hours, blackout curtains are a fantastic way to reduce light exposure and ‘trick’ your circadian rhythm into producing melatonin.

If you would like to add a blackout lining to your current curtains or book your curtains or blinds in for a maintenance clean, contact the team at Curtain Clean on 0800 579 0501.

Image
Top