213 John F Kennedy Drive
Milson
Palmerston North
  • Products and Services
  • Cleaning & MOULD REMOVAL

    We are industry specialists in removing mould and mildew from curtains, drapes & blinds.

    Takein or courier service

    Take your curtains to an agent or have them picked up by our courier. Curtains2u or GB Fielding.

    Fire Retarding fabric.

    Many curtain materials are flameable . We can Treat them with flame resistant solution. Keep safe.

    Repairs and Alterations.

    We can replace old torn linings and can make you new linings or add an extra lining to your curtains

    Roman Blind Repairs.

    We can do repairs to Roman blinds. We can add new roller rails to your Roman blinds.

    Duet & Verasol Repairs

    We clean and repair duet and verasol blinds, and night and day shades.

    AGENTS near you.

    Curtains2u 213- John F Kennedy Drive, Palmerston North
    Guthrie Bowron Feilding 62 Kimbolton Road.

    More Information

    Lots of information on our website.
    www.curtainclean.co.nz
    Chat availabe during business hours.

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1 day ago

Make a Living Wall

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Palmerston North

If you enjoy growing your own potted plants and would like a stylish way of displaying them inside the home, then this month's project could be just what you need. I've been admiring living walls and hanging gardens for some time now, and decided to create an achievable small-scale … View moreIf you enjoy growing your own potted plants and would like a stylish way of displaying them inside the home, then this month's project could be just what you need. I've been admiring living walls and hanging gardens for some time now, and decided to create an achievable small-scale version to house small pots and fresh herbs in my kitchen. These shelves are affordable and easy to make, and ideal for apartments and smaller homes without much garden space.

For this project you will need:
• 1 length of untreated pine 20mm thick and 120mm wide
• Hand saw or skill saw, sandpaper
• Drill with 72mm hole saw drill bit and 7.5mm drill bit (for 7mm rope)
• 9 x 9cm terracotta pots
• White synthetic general purpose rope 7mm x 10m, 8 x white plastic cable ties
• Resene Colorwood Whitewash, speed brush or synthetic paintbrush

• Various herbs or small plants

Step one: Cut your length of pine into three pieces, each 600mm long. You can do this with either a hand saw or a skill saw. Once cut, give them a sand.

Step two: Measure out the placement of your holes that will hold the terracotta pots. I spaced mine out at 150mm centres. Repeat these markings for all three lengths of timber.

Step three: Using a drill with a hole saw attachment, cut out 72mm (D) sized holes to fit your terracotta pots. I practised first on a spare cut of timber I had lying around, to make sure that the hole I was drilling was the right size. For my 9cm pots, I found that 72mm ensured a good fit. Tidy up each hole with a light sand.

Step four: Now you need to cut the holes for your rope. Measure in 20mm from each corner and mark your drilling spot. Use a 7.5mm drill bit to make one hole in each corner (the size drill bit you use will depend on the thickness of the rope you are using to hang your shelves – adjust accordingly). Repeat for all three lengths of timber.

Step five: To achieve a fresh, clean look I used Resene Colorwood Whitewash interior wood stain. There are lots of colours to choose from, so you could pick whichever best suits the timber you are using and where the finished project will be hanging. I applied two coats of Whitewash using a speed brush, or synthetic brush.

Step six: Cut your rope into four equal lengths and thread each length through the corner holes of your shelves starting from the bottom. Tie each length of rope into a knot on the underside of the bottom shelf, so the bottom shelf rests on these knots.

Step seven: Adjust the placement of your shelves until you get them evenly spaced. Make sure you allow room for the pots to sit in the shelves, and room for your plants to grow of course. I spaced my shelves at 200mm apart. Secure the undersides of your remaining shelves with cable ties, they are a good solution because they aren't hugely visible and they don't budge. Trim the long ends of the cable ties once in place.

Step eight: Add your pots and plants, and hang in your chosen spot. Make sure that you use hooks that can safely take the weight of your shelves.



DIY with pictures: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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5 days ago

How to Make Hemp Rope

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Palmerston North

Knowing how to make rope was once a critical skill for survival and self-sufficiency on the frontier. Early settlers were able to make rope from a variety of materials, but the main thing they used was hemp.

A rapid growing plant, hemp is perfect for making rope. Hemp grows fast. It produces up … View more
Knowing how to make rope was once a critical skill for survival and self-sufficiency on the frontier. Early settlers were able to make rope from a variety of materials, but the main thing they used was hemp.

A rapid growing plant, hemp is perfect for making rope. Hemp grows fast. It produces up to 75 tons of dry matter per acre per year. It thrives in poor soil, needs no fertilizers or pesticides to succeed, and gobbles up atmospheric CO2, stymieing the greenhouse effect. It produces more fibre per pound than either cotton or flax, and these fibres are easily extracted in order to make hemp rope, twine, or cord.

Hemp rope is easy to make. Some methods involve using a rope machine, but fortunately such an investment isn’t necessary to the process. All you really need is some hemp fibre or hemp twine, and a short piece of wooden dowel. Our hemp rope maker, available in our shop, will really streamline the process for you if you plan on making lots of hemp rope.

Step one: Separate the hemp fibres or unwind the hemp yarn and cut into lengths approximately twice as long as the desired length of the rope. Continue cutting until you have a bundle of fibres approximately half the size of the diameter of rope you’d like to make.

Step two: Grab the bundle of fibres and fold it in half, securing the fold by placing a dowel rod through the resultant loop and into the ground. Smooth the fibres of this bundle down by running your hand along the length of the cord.

Step three: Divide the bundle in two, holding half the fibres in your left hand and half the fibres in your right.

Step four: Twist each bundle clockwise until the cord you are creating begins to kink and loop. Pull as hard as you can while twisting.

Step five: Twist the two cords together, wrapping one over the other in a counter clockwise motion, to form a rope.

Step six: Secure the ends with overhand knots beginning with the end in your hands. Once the first end is tightly tied, slip the rope off the dowel rod and tie it as well.

To make a cable, repeat steps 2 through 6 and twist the two ropes together. This process can be repeated as many times as you like, making thicker, stronger cables as you go.

Enjoy making your own hemp rope! This technique can be used to make hemp twine, hemp cord. and hemp yarn as well. It all depends on the size of the fibres you start with. Need some ideas for what to do with your newly made hemp rope? Try using a piece as a clothesline, for air-drying your clothes. Make a hemp leash for your pet, or keep your hemp twine petite for use in jewellery making.

Making rope is a great way to be self-sufficient and eliminate the supply chain requirement. Everything you can make yourself is one less packaged product– in this case, one less coil of synthetic rope– that needs to be manufactured for you. Have fun!

8 days ago

Curtains & Blinds: Which types are best?

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Palmerston North

When it’s time to replace your curtains, most of us only worry about cost and style. But did you know this choice can make a massive difference to how warm and comfortable your home will be over winter? We tested which types were most effective at reducing heat loss in your home.


The … View more
When it’s time to replace your curtains, most of us only worry about cost and style. But did you know this choice can make a massive difference to how warm and comfortable your home will be over winter? We tested which types were most effective at reducing heat loss in your home.


The problem: If you have an insulated house, you can lose upwards of 45% of your heat through your windows. This drops to 30% in an uninsulated home, since it’s easier for heat to escape through the walls, ceiling and floors. This shows the importance of choosing wisely when it comes to your curtains or blinds; the right window coverings can save two-thirds of the heat lost through your windows.


Our test: We measured heat loss through an aluminium-framed single-glazed window fitted with different window coverings. The window was fitted to a mini-room inside our Thermal Comfort lab. The lab temperature was reduced to 4°C to simulate a chilly winter night, while an electric heater inside the mini-room beavered away to maintain a temperature of 20°C.


The different window coverings were tested for at least three hours and we measured the total power usage from the heater, along with the difference between indoor and outdoor temperature. These readings were then used to calculate how effective each window covering was at stopping heat escaping.

Reverse chimneys: Cool air is denser (heavier) than warm air. When it’s cold outside, the inside air close to a window pane is cooled and tends to sink. As this cooled air sinks, it gets replaced by warmer air from other of the room. This creates a circulating air current that cools the room parts.


Curtains that aren’t sealed at the top or bottom to stop these air currents can make the situation worse by forming a channel between the window and curtain. This allows cooled air to flow continuously and chill the room faster.


We tested two types of curtains, thermal and heavy lined, cut to both sill and floor length. The thermal curtains were in a single drop and had a plastic coating bonded to the fabric. You might have expected the thermal curtains would perform better, but the extra layer of fabric in the pricier heavy lined curtains made them better insulators. If you’re getting curtains fitted, opt for floor-length as they keep in heat better than ones that sit at the sill.


Which blinds are best?
We tested five types of blinds: honeycomb, roman, roller, and aluminium and wooden venetians.
Our blinds were installed within the window frame (with the exception of the romans), so there was no gap (like the one between the back of the curtain and the window frame) to allow a reverse chimney to form. Honeycomb blinds easily topped our testing for all window coverings. Air is a good insulator, as long as it’s not moving, and the honeycomb structure creates a large, still air gap between the cold window pane and the warm inside air.
Also, the honeycomb blinds fitted closer to the sides of the window frame than our other tested blinds, which also helped reduce heat loss.


While their public baths may have gone out of fashion, roman blinds are still going strong. Roman blinds were the best window covering after the honeycomb blinds and secondary double-glazing options. A roman blind’s good performance comes down to the close fit it has over the window frame. This good seal, along with a close fit to the wall at the top, helps retain heat.


Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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11 days ago

Movie Magic at Home

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Palmerston North

If your child is a real movie lover, then here are some Movie Magic activities to keep them busy over the school holidays.


Think outside the box (excuse the pun!), and create some real movie magic in your own home. Here are a few indoor ideas to get you started.


At home movie theatre … View more
If your child is a real movie lover, then here are some Movie Magic activities to keep them busy over the school holidays.


Think outside the box (excuse the pun!), and create some real movie magic in your own home. Here are a few indoor ideas to get you started.


At home movie theatre experience: It’s always nice to go out to the movies, but you can recreate that movie theatre feel at home, and turn an ordinary DVD, or streaming movie, into a real experience. Not only will your children have lots of fun, but with so many things to organise it will entertain them for a whole day or more.


Firstly choose a movie, and have your kids make a movie poster to advertise that it is ‘Coming Soon’ to your ‘at home’ theatre. Stick the poster to your lounge window, or if you’re really brave – to your letterbox.


Make invitations to attend the official premiere, and send them to your children’s friends with details of date, time and occasion. If you want, ask everyone to dress in fancy clothes so that the premiere can be extra special.


Set your lounge or theatre room up with rows of chairs, cushions or beanbags, and roll out a red carpet for your guests. If you don’t have a red rug, make a pathway with garden stakes up to your door, and tie on lots of red balloons. Make sure the curtains are closed, so the room is dark like a real theatre.


As your children’s guests arrive, greet them with a bag of sweet ‘n salty popcorn or a chocolate dipped ice-cream, and usher them to their seat with a torch. The premiere will be the talk of tinsel town!


Make your own movie: Think you might have a budding peter Jackson in the house? Have your children make their own movie with a video or sports camera, or even on your mobile phone. They can do the post-production editing using free phone apps, or there’s simple, free software you can download onto a desktop computer.


They will have to come up with a storyline first, and then spend time putting it together. You can even take them right through the process of drawing a movie storyboard and writing a short script. Of course there will also be the grand opening premiere at the end.

In some cities there are ‘movie making’ holiday programmes available, specifically using the computer. Start by asking your child’s school if they know of any movie making workshops, or check out your local computer shops. If all else fails, advertise at your local polytechnic, university or high school for a capable student who can help out. Give your child a few hours with an expert, and you’ll be amazed by what they come up with.

Hollywood ‘Walk of Fame’ paver: Nothing says Hollywood like a ‘Walk of Fame’ paver, and there are two ways to make one depending on the age and stage of your child. You can either buy a concrete paving stone and simply paint on their details, along with painted hand prints, or make a concrete paver right from scratch.


To make a mould, cut the bottom off a plastic bucket so you’re left with a dish approximately 5 cm deep. Mix up some quick set concrete and pour it into the dish. Using a stick (or the end of a paintbrush), draw on the Hollywood star and write your child’s details, then have them press their hands into the centre of the star.

Decorate the paver by pressing in pieces of coloured glass, tiles, old coins, marbles or shells. After 24 hours, or once the concrete is completely set, remove the paver from the mould and it’s ready to grace your ‘Walk of Fame’.



Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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16 days ago

Staying Warm for Less

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Palmerston North

Brace yourself. Severe weather is on its way for parts of the country and experts predict at least two days of icy temperatures, howling gales and torrential rain. Get the temperature up while keeping your power use down.

Our energy-saving tips will help reduce your overall electricity … View more
Brace yourself. Severe weather is on its way for parts of the country and experts predict at least two days of icy temperatures, howling gales and torrential rain. Get the temperature up while keeping your power use down.

Our energy-saving tips will help reduce your overall electricity consumption, meaning you won’t feel guilty for having a toasty home.


1. Don’t fear the electric blanket: they cost little to run (just over $10 per winter if used every night), especially compared to electric heaters. But only sleep with it on if it has a delay timer that can switch it off after a few hours. And it’s important not to neglect heating your bedroom – the World Health Organization recommends keeping bedrooms at 16°C.


2. Break out the crock pot: running a slow cooker all day uses a third of the electricity compared with cooking a roast in an electric oven for two hours.


3. Check your heat pump filter: it needs vacuuming every three months. The good news is it’s easy – just slide the cover off the front of your heat pump, lift out the filter and hoover away. If you haven’t cleaned it all year, you’ll immediately notice the difference. You don’t need to pay for a pricey heat pump service to get this sussed.


4. Clean your clothes dryer’s lint filter: don’t put your vacuum cleaner away just yet. Remove your clothes dryer’s lint filter, then give it a lux as well. This can significantly improve your dryer’s energy efficiency, thereby reducing its running costs.


5. Draught-proof your home: are your door hinges loose or your window latches rattly? Grab a screwdriver and tighten them up. This reduces the chance of nasty draughts blowing through your home. If that doesn’t work, buy some vinyl strips that adhere to the insides of the window frames to achieve a better seal between the window and the frame.


6. Cheapo double-glazing: you don’t have to be made of money to improve the heat retention of your windows - DIY window film, which fits across your frame and sits a little off the pane, can cost less than $10 per pane. You simply fit it to the frame to create an insulating layer of air between your room and the cold glass. Alternatively, taping bubble wrap to the window frames will achieve the same effect.


7. Light smarter: switch from your old incandescent, halogen or compact fluorescent (CFL) bulbs to LEDs. They use far less energy and last much longer.


8. Check your power deal: visit Powerswitch.org.nz to see if you could be getting a better deal for power elsewhere. If you’re on a spot-based tariff, consider switching for the winter to avoid the high spot prices currently experienced on cold winter evenings.


9. Shower smarter: grab a 10L bucket, chuck it under your shower and start timing. If it fills in less than a minute, your showerhead is a water-waster. You can snag a low-flow, energy-efficient showerhead for less than $100.

10. Revisit your childhood with a wheat bag or hot water bottle: it costs next to nothing to fill a hot water bottle or heat a wheat bag, and they’re a great way to keep the bed warm in a pinch.

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18 days ago

Rainy Day Holiday Activities

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Palmerston North

Rainy days are the one thing parents do not need during the holidays, but they happen. We have great ideas for free or low cost rainy day activities when the kids must play indoors.

In a perfect world, every school holiday would be filled with blue skies and sunny days, but unfortunately … View more
Rainy days are the one thing parents do not need during the holidays, but they happen. We have great ideas for free or low cost rainy day activities when the kids must play indoors.

In a perfect world, every school holiday would be filled with blue skies and sunny days, but unfortunately that’s not always the case – especially during Winter! It’s a good idea to have some inside activities up your sleeve for those ‘stuck indoors’ times. We’ve put together our favourite rainy day ideas for you to have on hand, just in case.


Let’s Get Physical: Just because you’re stuck inside, doesn’t mean the kids have to blob out and do nothing. In fact if one rainy day rolls into the next, they’ll be itching to move about and use up some energy. Try some of these ideas to get active while you’re stuck indoors:


•Make your own Ten Pin bowling alley by using plastic soft drink bottles and a rubber ball. Put a cup of sand or gravel in the bottom of each bottle to give them a bit of weight, and then arrange the ‘pins’ into a triangle shape at the end of the hallway. Children stand at the other end of the hall and take turns to bowl.Use your Ten Pin alley to fill in half an hour here and there, or arrange a whole tournament to take place amongst your children and their friends.


• Create an obstacle course that traipses through the whole house. I know it sounds like a nightmare to clean up, but it will keep the kids occupied for ages. Not only do they get to create the course, they then get to do it over and over. They can time each other to see who can do it the fastest, or experiment running the course backwards, blindfolded, or with their hands behind their backs. You’ll need to make sure the course is safe, so check it out before they launch into their races.

• Dancing is a great way to burn off some energy, so turn on some music and start moving that body. If you have a house full of kids, you could play musical games like statues or musical chairs.


Create your own Board Games: Board games are a great way to while away a few hours, but if your children are tired of the games you have at home, why not get them to make their own. Give them a large sheet of poster card, some felt pens, old magazines, scissors and glue, and let them go to it.
They’ll need to create their own rules, cards, counters and dice, and trust me – you’ll be amazed by what they come up with. The whole family can take turns playing each other’s games.

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

24 days ago

Eco-Bricks

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Palmerston North

What is an Eco-brick?
An eco-brick is a plastic bottle packed with shredded, single-use, non-recyclable plastics, compressed to a required density to create a reusable building block. They are a sustainable way to reusenon-biodegradable plastic waste as they are regarded as a long-lasting and … View more
What is an Eco-brick?
An eco-brick is a plastic bottle packed with shredded, single-use, non-recyclable plastics, compressed to a required density to create a reusable building block. They are a sustainable way to reusenon-biodegradable plastic waste as they are regarded as a long-lasting and durable material.

Eco-bricks = a low energy solution to keeping plastic out of the ecosystem!

What is the purpose of an eco-brick?
Making an eco-brick can be a tedious and time-consuming project (but great to do whilst watching TV!) and the purpose of it is to make you responsible for your own plastic waste and encourage you to reduce your own consumption.

The aim is to help you cut down on what you’re buying and ultimately produce less waste whilst creating something beneficial for yourself or the community!

What goes into the eco-brick?
The most important thing about an eco-brick is that the contents are CLEAN and DRY before they get stuffed. The reason for this is to prevent any bacteria or mould forming inside, which will undo all your hard work as they will not be validated!

You can put inside an eco-brick:
Potato chip, biscuit, cake packets etc.
Stretchy plastic e.g., carrier bags, bread bags, clingfilm etc.
Pasta/rice packets
Packaging – bubble wrap/plastic envelopes
Styrofoam/polystyrene
Hard plastic – meat trays, flowerpots etc (however, hard plastics will need to be cut up into much smaller pieces than soft plastic to allow you to reach the weight requirements)

What can I make with an eco-brick?
The most common personal projects are footstools! They can be as small or as large as you want, you can be creative with the bottle bottom colours to make a cool pattern or cover them in some fabric to make a decorative piece around the house!

There are other smaller projects you can make, like doorstops for example! I am personally taking inspiration from this one found on Pinterest:

Ok, so how do I make one?
It is very simple! The picture below shows you how in 5 simple steps. The key is to just keep stuffing until you can’t any more! With time and patience, your brick will come to life.

26 days ago

DIY – Terracotta Bud Vases

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Palmerston North

Take on the terracotta trend and sculpt a unique floral feature.


You will need:

- Modelling clay (air-drying or baking)
- Rolling pin

View more
Take on the terracotta trend and sculpt a unique floral feature.


You will need:

- Modelling clay (air-drying or baking)
- Rolling pin

- Knife
- Straw
- Fine sandpaper
- Test pot brush
- Paint test pots (we like Resene Sakura & Resene Apple Blossom)
- Resene FX Paint Effects Medium
- Small sponge
- Cord to hang


Step one: Start by rolling out your clay about 7mm thick (A). It’s important to work on a clean, non-stick surface.
Step two: Use a knife to cut a rectangle as long as you want the main shape to be, then cut a square roughly twice the width of the rectangle and two-thirds the height (B). No matter what shape you’re making, the top piece must be wider to form a dome or pocket. The backing piece always needs to be taller and have enough height to support your flora and allow for a hole.


Step three: If using air-drying clay, dip your fingers in water and wet the edges of the clay slightly – baking clay does not require any water to seal together. Take the smaller, wider square piece and make an arc over the backing piece, bringing the sides together (C). Press the sides down so the clay bonds together, then do the same along the bottom (D), making sure you still have a curved opening at the top.


Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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33 days ago

5 cheap (or free) ways to keep the house warm this winter

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Palmerston North

Don’t shiver in silence! Use these 5 simple (and cheap) techniques to warm up your home and stay toasty this winter.
Quick Summary
• Open curtains in the day, close them at night
• Make and use draft excluders
• Install window insulation films or use bubblewrap
• Keep furniture away… View more
Don’t shiver in silence! Use these 5 simple (and cheap) techniques to warm up your home and stay toasty this winter.
Quick Summary
• Open curtains in the day, close them at night
• Make and use draft excluders
• Install window insulation films or use bubblewrap
• Keep furniture away from heat sources and use rugs/blankets to insulate the floor
• Use as few rooms as possible and close off the rooms you aren’t using

1) STRATEGIC CURTAIN USE

After double-glazing, curtains are the next line of defence against the chill of winter. Thermal lined ones are best, and floor-to-ceiling ones provide a good ‘seal’ of warmth.


However, it’s also important to know when to open and close these curtains to get maximum effectiveness out of them. Generally, when the sun is up, keep the curtains open to let the sunlight and warmth in. As soon as the sun goes down, close them to trap that heat in overnight.

The advanced version is:
• In the morning, have north-facing and east-facing curtains open. Keep south-facing curtains closed throughout the day.
• In the afternoon, close the east-facing curtains and open the west-facing curtains. Keep the north-facing curtains open throughout the day.
• Once the sun sets, close all the curtains (including the north-facing ones).
• Repeat in the morning.
Curtains aren’t just for windows either! Pinning a rug or blanket over an external door can help give it an insulation boost too. Pro-tip: cover up pet flaps in the same way.

2) MAKE (AND USE) DRAFT EXCLUDERS
Draft excluders are long pieces of thick material, usually in the shape of a sausage, that are placed at the bottom of doors to keep the cold out and the warm in. You might be surprised at how much of a difference blocking even a small gap can make!



Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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33 days ago

A Woolly Tale

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Palmerston North

Humans have enjoyed wool for over 10,000 years and it continues to be a coveted textile in both high end fashion and interior design due to its many qualities. Here we deep-dive into the wonderful world of wool, sharing the tale of this ancient fibre’s origin, production and inherent attributes. … View moreHumans have enjoyed wool for over 10,000 years and it continues to be a coveted textile in both high end fashion and interior design due to its many qualities. Here we deep-dive into the wonderful world of wool, sharing the tale of this ancient fibre’s origin, production and inherent attributes.

ORIGIN

Britain is said to have lead wool manufacturing through spinning and weaving pre 1900 BC, a skill highly prized beyond their shores. Sheep were first exported beyond Europe to South Africa, New Zealand and Australia toward the very end of the 1700s. We have had a long time to accustom ourselves to the incredible natural qualities of wool and it is quite literally woven in to our trading, cultural and farming histories.


How does wool come to be? Fleece is shorn from sheep annually with a new fleece produced every year (unless you are Shrek the Sheep, who avoided shearing for 6 years – once finally caught in 2004 he produced enough wool for 20 large men’s suits, or 27 kg… blimey!). Once shorn, fleeces are thrown clean side down onto a wool table, skirted (a process to remove undesirable parts of the fleece), folded and rolled to determine class by a qualified wool classer. Bales of wool are then sent to be scoured, a bathing/cleaning process to remove dirt and impurities such as sweat and vegetable matter. Quality is determined by diameter, crimp, yield, colour and staple strength. Finer wools are used for apparel manufacture and heavier for soft furnishing textiles and carpets/rugs.
There are a wide variety of ways to process wool in to differing yarns, including worsted – a very fine yarn spun from carded wool producing a lustrous and smooth product especially suited to apparel. You may also be familiar with felted wools which are produced with heat, pressure and moisture compressing the fibres, entangling them together into a matted textile with a dense, ‘foamy’ or almost spongy appearance and feel. The woollen system of preparing carded wool for spinning ensures short fibres are retained, sometimes requiring combing. Wool can be spun to yarn on its own, or in conjunction with other fibres which can add desirable qualities and attributes to the finished fabric.


Despite a reputation as a land of sheep, New Zealand is actually the 4th largest producer of wool, with the top spot being taken out by Australia, responsible for 25% of global wool-clip. International wool production is about 2 million tonnes, 60% of which is apparel. Approximately 3% of the international textile trade is comprised of wool. We would like that number to be a little higher!

RENEWABILITY
A natural fibre similar to human hair, wool is made of keratin and therefore readily biodegradable. As long as there is grass to graze on, sheep will continue to produce fleece, making it an ideal renewable fibre. Safeguarding the environment is part of the important work undertaken by woolgrowers to guarantee future production and industry longevity. Due to the high quality and durability of wool, woollen products have wonderful longevity and it is also excellent for re-use and recycling. In some instances, wool products can be returned from the interior and fashion sectors to be carded and re-spun in to yarn for re-weaving – an excellent way to reduce waste and extend the life of the material. Because of its hardy nature, when properly looked after, wool has a longer lifespan than many other fibres - if you have ever visited an antique/vintage/mid-century furniture trader, you will often find original wool and wool blend upholsteries still going strong even after a few lifetimes, albeit in need of a good clean!

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

36 days ago

Why are my windows damp all the time?

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Palmerston North

How do you know it’s winter? When the windows start dripping. While it might seem like just another staple of New Zealand homes, you don’t have to put up with a pool of water at the bottom of your windows every morning.

How condensation forms and why it matters: Condensation is the result of… View more
How do you know it’s winter? When the windows start dripping. While it might seem like just another staple of New Zealand homes, you don’t have to put up with a pool of water at the bottom of your windows every morning.

How condensation forms and why it matters: Condensation is the result of water warming up, evaporating, then turning back into a liquid once it touches a cold surface. You know when you breathe onto a mirror and you can use your finger to write messages in the remaining mist? That’s condensation. The same thing happens with the moist air in your home and your cold windows.

What's the big deal about moisture anyway? Moisture doesn’t just make your home feel cold and damp, it causes mould too. Mould has all sorts of nasty effects on your health and it thrives in wet environments.

The condensation on the inside of your windows is a good indicator that there is too much moisture in your home. You can get accurate readings from a ‘hygrometer’; a cheap little device that you can get from many hardware stores that tells you exactly how humid the room is.

Ideally, you’d use one in each room of your house over the course of a few days to get an idea of which room is in most need of attention. If the reading is over 65% relative humidity and below 18 degrees Celsius, it might be time to take the following steps, depending on the room.

Kitchen
Boiling water and cooking kai releases up to 3 litres of water every day---it’s one of the worst offenders in the fight against wet windows. Doing the dishes isn’t much better, contributing up to 1 litre per day. To reduce the impact, remember to:
• Keep the extractor fan on. Your range hood should be larger than the cooking surface it’s venting, and should be venting directly outside---not to the roof space. Otherwise, it might end up damaging the insulation and internal roof structures. If you’re renting and the extractor fan doesn’t tick those boxes, it’s worth discussing with your landlord. They don’t want moisture or mould in your home either.
• Keep pots covered. If you’re boiling potatoes, pasta or just making a cup of coffee or tea, keep the lid on while the water heats up and while the contents cooks. Not only does this keep the steam inside, it also means the water boils faster---less energy used, a lower utility bill, and a faster dinner!

BATHROOM
Don’t worry, cleaning your teeth isn’t spreading moisture into the air, no matter how vigorously you scrub. But the bath and the shower certainly are, with each person releasing 1.5 litres of water per day with their washes.
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39 days ago

DIY - Snap crackle pot

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Palmerston North

Give some plain store-bought pots a fresh new look using Resene Crackle Effect. These small, plain herb pots were from The Warehouse. I used Resene Crackle Effect to give them a shabby chic look with on-trend paint colours.


You will need
• Test pot brushes
• Plants of your choice … View more
Give some plain store-bought pots a fresh new look using Resene Crackle Effect. These small, plain herb pots were from The Warehouse. I used Resene Crackle Effect to give them a shabby chic look with on-trend paint colours.


You will need
• Test pot brushes
• Plants of your choice (succulents and cacti look great with these paint colours!)
• Resene Smooth Surface Sealer Resene Crackle Effect
• Resene test pots


Instructions
Step 1: Start of by removing any price stickers and sticky residue. Next, prepare your pots for painting by applying one coat of Resene Smooth Surface Sealer all over. I painted my pots inside and out using a test pot brush. Leave to dry.


Step 2: Once your base coat has dried, paint each pot in a different colour. You will need to apply two coats, waiting for dry time in between. I chose the following colours for my pots: Resene Florentine Pink, Resene Wild West, Resene Moccaccino and Resene Wafer.


Step 3: Next, apply one coat of Resene Crackle Effect to the top third of the outside of each pot. I was after quite a strong crackle effect, so I applied quite a thick coat. You could also achieve this by applying two coats. Leave to dry completely. Repeat for all pots.


Step 4: Once the Crackle Effect is dry, apply one coat of your chosen white shade over the top of the Crackle Effect; I chose Resene Half Pot Pourri. You will need to work fast applying your paint, as the Crackle Effect will start to show quickly! Repeat for all pots. Leave to dry and let the effect work its magic. Once dry, add your favourite small plants and find a sunny spot for your cute new pots! You might like to try this effect on larger pots too.

Full DIY with pictures here: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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50 days ago

Always finding your neighbour’s cats in your garden?

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Palmerston North

Even though we all love animals, we are not always fans of other people’s cats doing their business in our gardens. Luckily, there is a handy, and animal-friendly, trick for this!

Cats are wonderful and cute animals, of course, but they’re a bit less cute when they pee, poo and dig all over … View more
Even though we all love animals, we are not always fans of other people’s cats doing their business in our gardens. Luckily, there is a handy, and animal-friendly, trick for this!

Cats are wonderful and cute animals, of course, but they’re a bit less cute when they pee, poo and dig all over our garden. This can cause a lot of trouble for you and your garden, so you might be looking for some tips to help prevent this! Because we are animal lovers, we don’t like the idea of scaring off cats with chemicals or nasty methods that aren’t animal friendly. We believe keeping cats out of your garden can also be done in a natural way.

There are several ways to discourage cats from coming into your garden that are in no way harmful to the cat but do give the required result. For instance, cats don’t like certain scents, which means you can use those to keep them out.


After asking around for a bit, we found out that a lot of people have trouble with neighbourhood cats in their garden. Some people love seeing those cute animals wandering around their garden, but other people would rather chase them away immediately. Everybody has their own methods for this as well. The most common method seems to be trying to scare the cat by yelling and waving your arms. Others go outside with a glass of water to try to pour over the cat. Of course, these methods don’t have the desired result. Some people get so frustrated that they end up in the newspaper because they tried shooting at the cats! That’s not what we want, so we’ve got a few tips for you instead.


Cats don’t like the smells of vinegar and citrus peel.


So, you can keep cats out of your garden pretty easily by putting bowls of vinegar or citrus peel in various places around the garden (in particular those places the cat likes to visit). The cat will then definitely stay away from those places. Another thing cats hate is cayenne pepper. So, it may be worth scattering a generous amount of cayenne pepper in places the cats like to visit. Then again, this may cause the cat to start sneezing violently, which make us feel a bit sorry for it.

If you don’t have any of these products at home and don’t feel like going to the supermarket, you could also try using garlic, ground coffee or chili pepper. Did you know about these natural, cat-resistant tips? Share them with your friends!

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44 days ago

Ways to make your home Feel cosier in Winter

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Palmerston North

Find out how a few key elements can warm up your abode over the winter months. Anyone can make a home that is inviting and relaxing after a long cold day.

Choose a warm paint colour
Explore the colour wheel - Notice that yellows, oranges and reds are on the warm side so utilising those colours… View more
Find out how a few key elements can warm up your abode over the winter months. Anyone can make a home that is inviting and relaxing after a long cold day.

Choose a warm paint colour
Explore the colour wheel - Notice that yellows, oranges and reds are on the warm side so utilising those colours will simulate a cosier, warmer mood. Blue and purples are on the cool side so they will simulate the opposite mood.

Warm lighting
Group lighting by using task and ambience lighting and a mixture of table and floor lamps. Warm coloured bulbs throw out a softer light and give a room a cosy feel.

TIP: Having your lights on separate switches means you can control how bright/dim a space will be.

Add pot plants
Any living element contributes to a cosy and inviting feel. Plants in baskets are not only on-trend, but they also generate more oxygen inside your home too.

TIP: Group pots together using different shapes and heights to make a focal point.

Carpet, rugs and textiles
Tiles are great but can be chilly underfoot in the cooler months. Carpets insulate, soften and warm up a room and New Zealand wool carpets are environmentally friendly with a sustainable fibre, plus naturally flame retardant.

Don’t discount rugs even if you have carpets. Make sure you choose a rug that works with your existing carpet. Placing a rug between yourself and the floor instantly guarantees a warmer atmosphere. Rugs are also incredibly good at tying a space together.

TIP: Garage carpet reforms the space from a cold concrete feel to a soft warm space too!



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46 days ago

7 ‘Unexpected’ Things You Can Clean with Laundry Detergent

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Palmerston North

Laundry detergent is a powerful cleaning agent. But did you know that it can do much more than just clean your clothes? The stuff can be multifunctional in your household. For example, you can use both the liquid and powder version for your drain, oven or car. We have listed seven things that you … View moreLaundry detergent is a powerful cleaning agent. But did you know that it can do much more than just clean your clothes? The stuff can be multifunctional in your household. For example, you can use both the liquid and powder version for your drain, oven or car. We have listed seven things that you can clean with laundry detergent.

1. Unclogging the drain

Is your drain clogged up? Don’t call a plumber just yet; try this trick first. Pour about 60 millilitres of laundry detergent into the sink and then (slowly) pour a litre of boiling water down the drain. The hot water and the liquid detergent work together to flush out the blockage. That saves you another visit from the plumber.

2. Making all-purpose cleaner

It is also perfectly fine to use laundry detergent to make all-purpose cleaner. To do this, mix 80 millilitres of bleach, 4.5 litres of water and a teaspoon of laundry detergent together. It works surprisingly well on walls, in the bathroom and on almost any other surface in the house.

3. Removing stains

When you think about it, it makes sense that the same stain-fighting properties that help clean your clothes, also work on upholstery and carpet. Apply powder detergent to a stain and rub it gently with a wet cloth to work the detergent into the stain. Wait five minutes, then wipe off the excess powder and repeat until the stain is gone.

4. Washing the car


Laundry detergent is ideal for cleaning the outside of the car. It removes dirt with ease. Makes sure to dilute the detergent fist. Just one tablespoon of laundry detergent per bucket of water should be enough. A solution that is too concentrated could damage the paintwork of your car, which is something we want to avoid! Of course, you can also use laundry detergent for the interior of the car, as described above.


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