2 days ago

9 Home Cleaning Hacks Tested

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Hamilton

The internet is awash with natural cleaning hacks. We put them to the test.


1. REMOVING A WATERMARK BY RUBBING WITH A WALNUT

The advice: Get rid of watermarks on wood by rubbing it with pieces of walnut (the nut not the shell).

How it worked: Vigorous rubbing was needed and we went … View more
The internet is awash with natural cleaning hacks. We put them to the test.


1. REMOVING A WATERMARK BY RUBBING WITH A WALNUT

The advice: Get rid of watermarks on wood by rubbing it with pieces of walnut (the nut not the shell).

How it worked: Vigorous rubbing was needed and we went through a few walnuts, but gradually the watermark disappeared. A quick polish with a clean cloth to finish it off.

Worth repeating? Yes, we were surprised at how well it worked, we even tried it on larger surfaces and it did the trick there too. | Rating: 5/5


2. USE OIL TO GET RID OF GREASE STAINS ON STAINLESS STEEL


The advice: Use a smear of olive oil (or similar) on a rag to clean fingerprints and grease smears off stainless steel appliances.


How it worked: Like a dream! It was easier and neater than using the spray-on stainless steel cleaner I have been buying from the supermarket. Trick is not to use too much, you just need the slightest smear...

Keep reading (with pictures: www.curtainclean.co.nz...)

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5 days ago

Home hacks: Your best tips for cleaning jobs around the house

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Hamilton

Most of these are free or inexpensive, and we can only assume they are tried and tested user-submitted hacks. It's interesting to note that the same everyday products crop up again and again, so let's hear it for dishwasher tabs. Here's what people to say...

IN THE KITCHEN

* … View more
Most of these are free or inexpensive, and we can only assume they are tried and tested user-submitted hacks. It's interesting to note that the same everyday products crop up again and again, so let's hear it for dishwasher tabs. Here's what people to say...

IN THE KITCHEN

* Dishwasher tabs are good to soak muffin trays and cake tins.
* I use dishwasher powder and a splash of bleach diluted in water to soak stained whites overnight. It will bring even whites that have been turned another colour in the wash back to sparkling white.
* Dishwasher powder works for the silver oven racks. I put them in a bath lined with an old towel, then add dishwasher powder, but the tablet would work and a bit of washing powder. Leave it to soak for four hours and it comes off pretty easily.
* To get tea stains off cups, use 1 tsp dishwasher powder and fill the cup up with hot water. Stir to dissolve the powder and let soak for a couple of hours. Put the cup in the empty sink so any overspill doesn't damage the benchtop.
* I clean my glass oven door with ash from my firebox. I clean my firebox glass door the same. Wet newspaper dipped in ash, rub all over glass, dry with clean newspaper. Brings it back like brand new. Used tea bags are also good with the ash.
* Got a pot which is filthy disgusting? Put a dishwasher tablet in put enough boiling water in to cover the filth, stick a lid on and leave over night. Amazing results.
* Soak your filters from the kitchen rangehood extractor fans in warm water and clothes washing powder. Grease and oil just melts off with no scrubbing at all. Good as new!
* Here are two tips to save your money. Let oven warm up. Once warm, the oil stain on door turns soft, and it just wipes off. Tip 2, if it's been baked on for years you just need a sharp blade. You can use one of those window scrapers, but no liquid. Scrape it (when warm); grab a vacuum and suck up all the dust.
* To clean stainless steel tub. Get a tube of Autosol from Mitre 10 or similar and clean with that. Have done it and it works brilliantly. First used to restore chrome on vintage car (brilliant) so gave it a go and delighted at the outcome.
* Oil of cloves is brilliant on mould. Smells a bit like dentist for an hour but it kills mould spores. The chemist sells it fairly cheaply, or Trade Me.
* We run a motel and polish the stainless steel every day. You need three rags. First rag works Polaris paste into the stainless steel. You end up with a rag caked with the paste. Add a little water and mop it up with a second rag. Then with a third clean rag you buff up the surface. We cut up old worn-out towels into squares to make rags.
Other cleaners such as Jif and Chemco also work, but Polaris gives the best shine.
* I put my oven racks and rangehood filters in the dishwasher and let that do the hard work. As soon as the cycle has finished, I remove the racks one at a time, closing the washer door between each one to keep hot, and just wipe over each rack with a Scotchbrite scourer dipped in hot water. The remaining grease marks come off easily; no hard rubbing needed. For the filters, I just rinse them in hot water and give them a good shake to remove as much water as possible then stand them on one edge outside to dry. I do this every three months and clean-up is easy. Oh, and if my oven door glass has grimy grease-spots, I use a putty scraper. It doesn't scratch the glass and it works a dream.

IN THE BATHROOM
* Try using dishwash liquid to clean your bath and shower, including the glass.
* Dishwasher tabs get brown stains out of your toilet.
* To get those stains off toilet bowls, use a very, very fine wet and dry sandpaper.
* Razor blades/paint scraper blades are awesome for removing water stains from around your taps or tiles.
* For the shower, I use 30 Seconds water spot remover to clean first. Then use Rain-X water repellent (the car windscreen stuff). The water just beads off the glass and makes cleaning easier. Reapply the Rain-X every few months when the beading has reduced.
* Try a piece of pumice – free from the beach. Wet the door and clean it with the pumice. It does a brilliant job and is also good on burnt saucepans.

FIREPLACE
* Dirty logburner glass? Dip a wet cloth in the ashes. Scrub with that.

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8 days ago

Flower Power Wallpaper Release 2021

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Hamilton

The perennial theme of botanical print in interior design will continue in 2021 and is unmistakable in the new Flower Power wallpaper collection from James Dunlop, launching February 2021.

Continuing to deliver on this popular trend, the Flower Power wallpapers showcase a retro aesthetic, … View more
The perennial theme of botanical print in interior design will continue in 2021 and is unmistakable in the new Flower Power wallpaper collection from James Dunlop, launching February 2021.

Continuing to deliver on this popular trend, the Flower Power wallpapers showcase a retro aesthetic, reflective of an era that embraced a maximalist approach to interior design.

The namesake of the collection Flower Power pays homage to the counterculture design movement of the 1960s and 1970s, which celebrated global design influences, bold pattern, stylised folk art and sundrenched colour.

Bold, geometric forms mix with romantic florals within eight new wallpaper designs that feel playful yet offer a comforting sense of nostalgia in both design and colour. These mid-century inspired patterned wallpapers will pair harmoniously with rattan, textured paint, exposed brick and warm timber, as well as tactile textiles such as boucle and corduroy.

The Flower Power collection embraces Visual Optimism, a design concept whereby joy can be cultivated via your visual environment. Featuring bold stylised floral motifs in eight unique patterns, these wallpapers will add personality to your home interiors or working space. Available in a playful palette of fresh nature inspired neutrals, with accent colours of gold, brown, emerald, teal, peach and pink. Whether you are looking for soft pastels, earthy tones or vibrant shades, the Flower Power collection offers a myriad of speciation opportunities.


Within the design community, trends across fashion and interiors are cyclical, with the past being a constant muse for today’s inspiration. The Flower Power collection allows you to either fully immerse yourself in nostalgic design of the 1960s and 70s through statement wallpaper in acid edged colour, or take a less literal approach with the small scale transitional patterns for a subtle and contemporary look.

Expertly printed in Europe onto non-woven backed heavy vinyl, these easy to hang wallpapers will inject joy into your residential or commercial environment. All wallpapers have the benefit of being washable, fire retardant and easily removable.


A subtle illustration of natures irregular and rhythmic texture. April offers a unique alternative to a plain textured wallpaper, for those after a hint of decoration. In a refined palette of gold and silver with an iridescent metallic finish, April is printed onto Non-Woven backed heavy vinyl creating a sophisticated solution for both residential and commercial spaces.


Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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11 days ago

How to Prevent Mouldy Curtains and Blinds

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Hamilton

Why does mould appear in the first place?
Mould grows in damp areas where there is a food source such as dust, dirt or organic material. That’s why single glazed or drafty windows, where condensation and dust are common, are often a problem area.

What are some tips for preventing mould … View more
Why does mould appear in the first place?
Mould grows in damp areas where there is a food source such as dust, dirt or organic material. That’s why single glazed or drafty windows, where condensation and dust are common, are often a problem area.

What are some tips for preventing mould growth?
Clean soft furnishings regularly according to the manufacturer’s instructions. This usually involves a regular light vacuum, with less frequent dry cleaning or laundering. Regularly clean windows and wipe down window surrounds and venetian blinds or shutters with a mild detergent in warm water.

Does the material of the curtains affect how much mould will grow?
Yes, consider selecting window coverings manufactured from man-made materials, particularly in damp areas such as the bathroom, kitchen and on south-facing windows. It’s best to use a wipe-able, water-resistant blind or shutter in wet areas like bathrooms and kitchens. Even man-made fabrics don’t cope well in those environments.

How do I remove the mould?
Once mould develops it’s best to nip it in the bud as early as possible with a thorough clean. Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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15 days ago

The Benefits of Buying Locally

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Hamilton

Want to put your money where your heart is? Locally made products come with a whole lot of benefits - typically higher quality and greater attention to detail being in the top two.

The face behind the product had a dream of starting up on their own, knew in their heart of hearts it was a great … View more
Want to put your money where your heart is? Locally made products come with a whole lot of benefits - typically higher quality and greater attention to detail being in the top two.

The face behind the product had a dream of starting up on their own, knew in their heart of hearts it was a great product (or service) and believed it could help others. So, they took some risks, took over the dining table, made lots of mistakes, thought about the business day and night - but always kept going. Here are some decent reasons to shop local...

Boosting the local economy: Seventy per cent of all NZ Enterprises are sole traders. That's a big number. But purchasing locally doesn't just build an economic future for small businesses, it’s an economic confidence that spills out into other areas in life and the community.

Customer service: Buy locally and you are sure to receive a customer service above the ordinary. Plus, it's always reassuring to know you can call a local number if somethings amiss or not quite right.

Feel good factor: Knowing that your money lands in the lap of a local business with integrity and passion creates that lovely feel-good factor. You can see the love in the product, the packaging, the personal notes.

Customised goods = meeting consumer needs: More often than not you are talking to the maker directly so selecting a specific colour or changing out something is more likely to happen.

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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19 days ago

Do Thermal Curtains Really Work?

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Hamilton

Curtains, particularly thermal lined ones, can reduce heat loss by as much as 60%, depending on the type of windows your home is fitted with. The key to ensuring you get the most out of your curtains is in understanding exactly how heat is lost, and how the use of thermal lined curtains can prevent… View moreCurtains, particularly thermal lined ones, can reduce heat loss by as much as 60%, depending on the type of windows your home is fitted with. The key to ensuring you get the most out of your curtains is in understanding exactly how heat is lost, and how the use of thermal lined curtains can prevent this.

Understanding the physics: You know the old saying that hot air rises? Well, during cold weather that is exactly what happens, and something called the reverse chimney effect comes into play.

It is widely accepted that cold air is denser, and therefore heavier, than warm air. When it’s cold outside the air close to the window is cooled and sinks down (due to its density increasing with the temperature change). When the cooled air sinks it’s replaced by warmer air from other parts of the room.

As you can imagine, this then creates a circulating current, taking all of your warm air and replacing it with cool air. And just like that, you have lost most of your heat, not just near the window, but in the entire room.

If your curtains are not fitted correctly they form a channel between the window and the curtain, creating a space for the cooled air to sit and increasing the effect of the reverse chimney. The most important aspect to note is that it is the power of each factor combined, which decreases heat loss. No single factor works in isolation.

The first thing to ensure is that your curtains fit your windows correctly. This means that they are within a millimetre of perfect, with absolutely no gaps at the top or bottom. They need to fit against the wall snugly, creating a seal between the curtain and window.

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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20 days ago

The difference between Lined and Unlined curtains

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Hamilton

Curtains are an essential part of every home’s decor. And having the right curtains can be the last piece to the puzzle - the furnishing that makes the room, while having the wrong ones . . . well, no one wants to look at bad curtains.


When given an option, should the curtains be lined or … View more
Curtains are an essential part of every home’s decor. And having the right curtains can be the last piece to the puzzle - the furnishing that makes the room, while having the wrong ones . . . well, no one wants to look at bad curtains.


When given an option, should the curtains be lined or non-lined? What are the differences? We'll find out in this article.


Lined curtains, as the name would suggest, have a supplemental lining on the inside of the curtain. This lining can be multifunctional so it’s best to consider what you want to achieve with your curtains.


Sometimes the lining is simply for decoration, giving the curtain a bit of depth and extra weight, perhaps offering a splash of colour to offset the primary colour of the curtain.


More often than not, they are often designed to be noise cancelling, heat insulating, or fully light blocking, among other things. If for example, you’re planning your living room to also be a fully functional home entertainment centre, 100% blackout - lined curtains would be your best bet.


Lined curtains offer better privacy due to the extra thickness of the fabric. They often have extended lifetime compared to unlined curtains due solely to the lining preventing the fabric from fading.

Unlined curtains, on the other hand, have their own advantages.
They are both lighter and airier making them perfect for rooms that have either smaller or fewer windows and a tendency to remain dark.



Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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21 days ago

Stop Your Curtains Getting Damp and Mouldy

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Hamilton

It’s time to bid farewell to summer for another year and start facing the reality that soon it’s going to be cold and damp for a while. As we enter those colder months and condensation appears on the windows, we thought it was a good time to share some tips on preventing mould and mildew … View moreIt’s time to bid farewell to summer for another year and start facing the reality that soon it’s going to be cold and damp for a while. As we enter those colder months and condensation appears on the windows, we thought it was a good time to share some tips on preventing mould and mildew growing on your curtains.

What makes mould and mildew grow?
Interestingly, it’s not directly the condensation on your windows that causes mould and mildew because most curtains don’t come into contact with it. Mould and mildew grow when there’s moisture and warmth in the home, which condensation does contribute to.
Just like everything absorbent in your home, as temperatures go up the moisture in the air evaporates and is absorbed into the fabric. As they cool, the moisture changes back from its gaseous state to being closer to its liquid form. In absorbing this moisture, they also take in any bacteria it holds. Repeated over time, this is what causes the nasty growths.

The difference between mould and mildew
Mould is a broad term that encompasses multiple identical nuclei and can grow beneath and penetrate the surface of affected material. Mildew is a type of mould that grows on the surface and can therefore be much more easily treated/removed. When its live, moulds are orangey or reddish in colour. The black patches we see are actually the hibernating mould spores waiting for the sun to warm them up and bring them back to life.

Where does all this moisture come from?
We live in a pretty humid climate in New Zealand at the best of times; in some areas it’s even greater. But it’s not all weather related. Cooking, showering, drying clothes, unflued gas heaters and simply breathing and existing all produce moisture content within our homes.

Preventing moisture build up and/or drying out your home
- Install a home ventilation system of some kind.
- Crack the windows a little during the day to allow a bit of cool air to flow through your home. North facing windows are best....



Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

28 days ago

DIY Chalkboard Houses

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Hamilton

These are super easy to make and provide hours of creative play as well as encourage the development of your toddler's hand-eye coordination and attention span.

To make some chalkboard blocks of your own you’ll need to gather a few supplies (Bunnings or Mitre 10 should have everything you… View more
These are super easy to make and provide hours of creative play as well as encourage the development of your toddler's hand-eye coordination and attention span.

To make some chalkboard blocks of your own you’ll need to gather a few supplies (Bunnings or Mitre 10 should have everything you need):
• plank of wood
• saw
• chalkboard paint
• paint brush
• paint tray
• sandpaper

Cut down the wood into rectangles and saw the corners off one end to form a house shape. You can make the blocks as tall, short, or narrow as you’d like. Variety makes your city scape more interesting!

When the blocks are cut, sand all the edges and front so they are smooth and there are no rough spots. Then, simply paint over with chalkboard paint and let dry overnight before use.


Once the paint has dried, have fun creating your little city!
Printable link: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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32 days ago

How to Keep Indoor Plants Alive

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Hamilton

These five tips will help to keep your house greens looking lush!

1. Potting and repotting

When potting a plant, choose a pot that has good drainage and always use a good quality potting mix (I use Tully’s Perfect Potting). If you do have a pot without drainage, you can pot it in a smaller … View more
These five tips will help to keep your house greens looking lush!

1. Potting and repotting

When potting a plant, choose a pot that has good drainage and always use a good quality potting mix (I use Tully’s Perfect Potting). If you do have a pot without drainage, you can pot it in a smaller plastic pot and pop it inside.
When repotting, pick a pot that’s one size bigger than the one you have, place some firmly packed potting mix in the bottom and a small sprinkle of plant fertiliser (I use Ecostore Organic Biophos). Give the plant a good water and gently tip the pot on its side and ease out the plant, place it in the new pot and gently fill with potting mix, press down soil and keep filling until you are about 2-4cm from the top of the pot.

2. Light

Most plants like bright indirect sunlight. Plants get their nourishment and energy from the sun so don’t be shy about placing them in bright sunlight. As the seasons change, watch the light levels and move plants closer or further away from windows. Some plants can survive in very dim light but give them a bright light holiday one day a week. Pale foliage is a sign that your plant might not be getting enough light and brown patches on leaves can mean the plant is getting singed.

3. Water

One of the most common reasons indoor plants die is overwatering. The majority of plants need to be watered once a week. Once a month place them in a sink or bucket and drench the soil and roots, then let the water drain out well before placing them back in their spots. There are a few plants that like more water, such as peace lilies, and some that like less, including ZZ plants and snake plants.

4. Humidity

Lots of indoor plants, and the majority of what we sell, originate from sub-tropical rainforest-type climates. They love a light misting daily or you can sit them in the bathroom while you take a shower.

5. Choosing plants

Pick the right plant for you and your lifestyle. If you are new to house plants, start with an easy-care plant such as a succulent or cactus, then you can graduate to other types. If you go away a lot choose a plant that can survive without attention. If you live in the city you might want to think about plants that have super air cleansing powers.


The whole process of choosing plants and their weekly routine can be quite meditative. Enjoy the watering rituals you create — it’s a good chance to practise your mindfulness. Just remember once you start it’s hard to stop!

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35 days ago

Textile Fibres and Their Characteristics

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Hamilton

We are passionate about fabrics and finding the right solutions for our customers. With over 110 years of experience in the textile industry we have compiled some of this knowledge and look forward to sharing it with you over the next year through our blog series – An Educational Yarn. Our … View moreWe are passionate about fabrics and finding the right solutions for our customers. With over 110 years of experience in the textile industry we have compiled some of this knowledge and look forward to sharing it with you over the next year through our blog series – An Educational Yarn. Our first topic explores the different characteristics of textile fibres.

Textile fibres are natural or synthetic structures that can be spun into yarn. Yarns are then woven, knitted or bonded into fabric. The inherent characteristics of fibre properties directly relate to the performance and required care and maintenance of the finished fabric, therefore understanding fibres and yarns will in turn help you to understand the how to apply specific fabrics within your interior schemes.

Natural Fibres: Occurring in nature; which are of animal, vegetable/plant or mineral origin.


COTTON (Plant Origin)

• A strong fibre, even stronger when wet, cotton has good natural durability.
• Can be affected by mildew however a mildew resistant finish can be applied to reduce this issue.
• Generally has reasonable sunlight resistance but should be protected with a quality lining when used as a drapery and protected from direct sunlight when used as an upholstery.
• It is an absorbent fibre which means it can move with changing humidity levels.
• May shrink with laundering but this can be reduced through a finishing process on the fabric known as sanforising.
Sunlight resistance can be greatly reduced in acidic polluted conditions.


SILK (Animal origin; an animal fibre that comes from the silkworm. The silkworm creates its cocoon from very long silk fibres which are harvested from mulberry trees.)

• It is naturally fine in texture, and colours beautifully.
• Its biggest disadvantage in furnishing is its sensitivity to UV light degradation (direct and reflected). Due to its sensitivity, it should not be used in direct sunlight or even bright light.
• An absorbent fibre, it has the potential to move in humid environments.
• Silk is a relatively strong fibre and can withstand a certain amount of abrasion, particularly when used in conjunction with
• a backing fabric.
• Unrivalled in splendour and smoothness, silk is regarded the most exclusive of all natural fibres.

LINEN
Plant origin; derived from cellulose fibres that grow inside the stalks of the flax plant.
• As with cotton it is affected by acidic pollution.
• Can be affected by mildew which will likely cause the fibre to deteriorate over time.
• Considered to be the strongest of the natural fibres; if constructed for upholstery it is very durable, particularly when blended with up to 10% nylon.
• Is regarded as a luxury fibre because of its lustre and texture.
• It is an absorbent fibre which means it can move with changing humidity levels
• Linen has moderate sunlight resistance and should be protected by a quality lining when used as a drapery and protected from direct sunlight when used as an upholstery.



Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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46 days ago

How to Get Rid of Cockroaches

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Hamilton

Cockroaches are an extremely common household pest throughout all of New Zealand and although they make you shudder when you see them, they thankfully do not pose many health risks, however they can transmit diseases, so it is best to keep them out of your home. As with any pest the number one … View moreCockroaches are an extremely common household pest throughout all of New Zealand and although they make you shudder when you see them, they thankfully do not pose many health risks, however they can transmit diseases, so it is best to keep them out of your home. As with any pest the number one preventative measure is to keep your home and outside surrounding areas as clean as possible. We’ll talk through more information about the different types of cockroaches, how to prevent an infestation before it happens, and if needed how to kill cockroaches.

What are the 3 main types of cockroach?
Although there are thousands of different species of cockroach, here in New Zealand we tend to only deal with the following three culprits. They are all pests and have the potential to transmit diseases such as dysentery, salmonella and diarrhoea due to their eating habits. See below for more information on the pests most wanted list.

The Gisborne Cockroach
This is our native representative, although it was first introduced from Australia, they are usually not found in doors at all so if you spot one of these in your home, it was likely by accident such as being carried in through timber and firewood.

They commonly live outdoors in damp dark areas and feed on decaying forest matter, so if you happen to spot one of these, it might be worth just giving a helping hand to get it back outside again.

The American Cockroach
This is the most common species found in New Zealand and is known as a pest throughout the world. Despite the name this species is native to Africa and the Middle East. They have adapted very well to human living spaces as they prefer moist areas with warmer temperatures.

Classified as omnivores, they will eat many foods as well as materials including leather, beer, glue and book bindings. They have the potential to cause sickness in humans, from their odorous secretions and bacteria that they pick up and deposit on food and surface areas and so it is very important to keep your house as clean as possible.

The German Cockroach
Although the smallest of the cockroach species found in New Zealand, they are actually the biggest problem. They do not like cold temperatures to a point where they struggle to survive and so they will always look to go inside of buildings for warmth. They more commonly prefer restaurants, food processing facilities and hotels to residential.


They are defined as omnivore scavengers, meaning they eat everything the American Cockroach does as well as meats, starches, sugars and fatty foods.


Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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37 days ago

When A Lining Is Not A Lining, But So Much More…..

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Hamilton

Look, we have to be honest, curtain linings are not the sort of thing that will blow your hair back with sheer delight. It’s sort of hard to get excited about a functional item like this – a bit like getting excited about a new water heater, carpet underlay, or new gutters…! It’s usually … View moreLook, we have to be honest, curtain linings are not the sort of thing that will blow your hair back with sheer delight. It’s sort of hard to get excited about a functional item like this – a bit like getting excited about a new water heater, carpet underlay, or new gutters…! It’s usually the face fabric, the star of the show at the window that brings the pizazz, colour or texture to a space, with lining tucked in behind, performing the admirable duties of light blocking and fabric protecting.


However, these are virtues to be celebrated as they help us make bolder decisions about the drapery fabrics for our spaces. They are also not what linings once were, and many now have the capacity to stand alone as a super practical drapery in their own right, heralding a new era for a previously much maligned fabric category. Prepare to have your hair blown back boys and girls…


Where to Begin: Well, it’s important to establish the purpose of the lining – is this a room you plan on sleeping in till midday? Lucky you! You will need a blackout (sometimes called a blockout), which will completely block light filtration, allowing you to sleep easy in blissful darkness.

These are used in five-star hotels, and in the homes of shift workers or young children who need to be able to sleep at any time of the day without pesky circadian rhythms waking you up from the light. Once upon a time, blackout linings were desperately practical, coming in white or off white (if you were lucky) and with a three-pass coating on the back (three layers of acrylic based flock).



Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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39 days ago

Mouldy linings? We can clean that!

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Hamilton

Sharing some more before and after photos of font and back fabric of a mouldy curtain. These levels of mould are more common than you think. As you can see we sometimes need to take the curtain hem down to get it properly clean, which we sew back up before returning to you.

61 days ago

Protecting your home from fires

Robert Anderson from Curtain Clean Hamilton

1. Check your smoke alarms
Smoke alarms provide an early warning in case of a fire inside your home. Traditional alarms beep when they detect smoke or fire, while smart detectors also send an alert to your phone. There should be a smoke detector in every room in your house except bathrooms, for … View more
1. Check your smoke alarms
Smoke alarms provide an early warning in case of a fire inside your home. Traditional alarms beep when they detect smoke or fire, while smart detectors also send an alert to your phone. There should be a smoke detector in every room in your house except bathrooms, for maximum protection. You also need one in the hallway between the living area and bedrooms.
Crucially, you are highly advised to test your smoke alarms at least once a year to ensure they still work. You are four times more likely to die in a house fire without a functioning smoke alarm!

2. Get a fire extinguisher
Having a fire extinguisher handy can make the difference between a small kitchen mishap that was successfully contained, and the house literally burning down. There are different types of fire extinguisher, classified according to the kind of fire they’re designed to tackle. Make sure you are aware of what the differences are and how to use each one in an emergency situation. A typical home extinguisher should have an ABC rating:
• Class A – combustibles such as wood, paper, cloth, rubber, household rubbish, most plastics
• Class B – flammable liquids, solvents, oil, petrol, paints and lacquers
• Class C – gases including methane, propane, hydrogen, acetylene and natural gas
• Class D – combustible metals including magnesium and aluminium swarf
• Class E – Electrical fires
• Class F – chip pan fires, as an alternative to a fire blanket

3. Create a fire stopping landscape
A fire originating from outside, such as a wildfire, is best thwarted by preventing it from reaching your house in the first place. You can use landscape gardening design to slow down or stop the spread of fire towards your home, by adhering to these tips:
• Use hard landscaping such as concrete, stone or gravel around the house
• Clear any dry vegetation from around the home, particularly in the summer
• Use fire resistant plants such as lavender and honeysuckle for soft landscaping, and spread them out, to slow down fire and stop it from spreading
• Keep outdoor plants well watered during the summer months. Lush green planting is less likely to burn.

4. Use fire retardant materials
Let’s start with building materials; some are more vulnerable to fire than others. Using fire retardant alternatives and fireproofing your interiors are good first lines of defence against a potentially serious tragedy. Make the changes when you are refurbishing or redecorating your home. The Building.govt.nz website has a comprehensive list of everything you can do to help prevention of fire occurring. Designing for fire can also be designing for sustainability which is without a doubt a win-win!

When it comes to materials, concrete panels, stucco or brick for exterior walls, steel framing for windows and concrete or metal for roofing are all good choices. Fire retardant paint is also a good idea. For decking, concrete, tiles, stone or brick are better than wood.

Inside your home, choose fire resistant curtains and upholstery fabrics. Additional flameproofing can also be administered to your existing home fabrics and upholstered furniture in situ. Curtain Clean can service your existing upholstery anywhere in the country. Call us on 0800 579 0501 for prices and to find out more.

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