17 Alach Street
Gate Pa
Tauranga
  • Curtain Clean
  • Curtain Clean specializes in cleaning all types of curtains, Roman blinds, Duet blinds and others.

  • Products and Services
  • Cleaning & MOULD Removal.

    We are industry specialists in removing mould and mildew from curtains, drapes & blinds.

    Bring in or pickup BOP.

    We can arrange for your curtains to be removed and rehung or you can bring them into the workshop.

    Repairs & Alterations

    At Curtain Clean we can repair your curtains, replace the linings and alter the curtains.

    Roller Blind Cleaning

    We clean roller blinds and can cut them down when you replace your windows with double glazing.

    Fire Retarding Curtains

    Many curtain materials are flameable . We can Treat them with flame resistant solution.

    Agents in many area's.

    See our website for your local agent or call/chat with us for more assistance. curtainclean.co.nz

    Roman blind repairs.

    We can do repairs to Roman blinds. We can add new roller rails to your Roman blinds.

    Duet and Verasol Blinds

    We clean and repair duet and verasol blinds, and night and day shades.

    New or replacement lining

    We replace old torn linings and can make you new linings or add an extra lining to your curtain.

    Need more info?

    See our website for more. www.curtainclean.co.nz
    Chat available during office hours.

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162 days ago

Do Curtains Reduce Heat?

Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

As the summer months approach, many people look for ways to keep their homes cool without relying entirely on air conditioning. One simple and cost-effective method is the use of curtains. This article will explore how curtains can reduce heat and provide a more comfortable living space.

How … View more
As the summer months approach, many people look for ways to keep their homes cool without relying entirely on air conditioning. One simple and cost-effective method is the use of curtains. This article will explore how curtains can reduce heat and provide a more comfortable living space.

How Curtains Reduce Heat
Blocking Sunlight: Curtains act as a barrier to the sun's rays, preventing them from heating up your room. By closing the curtains during the hottest part of the day, you can reduce the temperature inside.

Material Matters: The type of fabric plays a crucial role in how effective the curtains are at blocking heat. Thick, dense materials like velvet or blackout fabrics can block more heat compared to sheer or lightweight fabrics.

Colour Choices: Darker colours tend to absorb more heat, whereas lighter colours reflect it. While dark curtains may block more sunlight, they might also trap more heat. On the other hand, lighter curtains can keep a room cooler by reflecting heat away.

Insulating Properties: Some curtains have a special lining that adds an extra layer of insulation, keeping the heat outside and the cool air inside. These can be particularly effective in maintaining a comfortable temperature.


Benefits of Using Curtains to Reduce Heat
Energy Savings: By reducing the need for air conditioning......

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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202 days ago

Sound Absorption for Comfortable Living

Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

“That tiny crack that runs around your door transmits more sound than you would know”

Noise is a daily occurrence that we all endure to a certain degree from noisy kettles, screaming children, loud TVs and the deafening thud of a bass. There’s sometimes little peace in ones day. Ongoing … View more
“That tiny crack that runs around your door transmits more sound than you would know”

Noise is a daily occurrence that we all endure to a certain degree from noisy kettles, screaming children, loud TVs and the deafening thud of a bass. There’s sometimes little peace in ones day. Ongoing excessive noise is not only aggravating it can actually be harmful to your ears and has a significant impact on the way our spaces work in the home.

When it comes to residential design, the acoustics, (the way in which the structural characteristics of a space relate to how well sound can be heard) although a key design feature, are rarely considered during the building process and sometimes only tackled during a renovation.

Soundwaves seep through doors, windows, ceilings and cracks, so how do you reduce unwanted sound from affecting your day to day activities?

Hard flat surfaces tend to bounce sound waves around, sometimes creating a lasting echo effect if the surfaces are parallel walls. The softer and less uniform the surface, the less opportunity sound has to bounce off. Textiles, including drapery and upholstered furniture and furnishings not only deliver a design aesthetic they also play a significant role in the absorption of sound.

However not all textiles have equal sound absorption qualities however. The level of sound absorption is dependent upon a textile’s weight, composition, and/or construction. Generally (due to the large vertical mass) drapery provides the main textile source of sound absorption however, there are several other ways to achieve this.

To decrease the level of sound in a room you need to dampen the sound waves. This can be achieved by adding surfaces that absorb the sound (or reverberation) so the sound doesn’t bounce from one thing to another.

Here are some sound absorbing ideas that you can implement fairly simply into your home:

- Acoustic panels/tiles: These come in a range of colours and fabric styles and can be designed into your interior decor. The purpose of acoustic panels is to reduce, but not entirely eliminate, resonance within the room.
- Drapery: Fabrics are an effective solution for managing sound. The more drapery folds, the more sound absorption. Hanging a curtain a small distance off the wall increases sound absorption and softening opposing walls reduces sound waves from travelling wall to wall
- Upholstered furniture: The fabrics on your upholstered furniture also help to reduce sound waves. The thicker the fabric and foam the better. Add cushions and other textiles throughout a space for ultimate sound absorption.
- Cork flooring: While it may not be fashionable of late, cork is one of the best materials for sound absorption. Made up of a honeycomb design of air-sealed cells made of the bark of the cork oak. The cells each absorb the vibrations of sound, preventing those sounds from passing through to the other side. Cork reduces sound and noise vibration by trapping it in its cell structure. It reduces the sound transmission of sound through walls and absorbs the impact of feet through the floor to the ceiling below.
- Concrete flooring: Surprisingly, lightweight porous concrete can be effective in absorbing sound (however it essentially transmits the sounds through to the next room too).
- Carpets, rugs and padding: If your floors are timber, tiles or linoleum on subfloor concrete, you may want to try rugs or carpet coupled with a sound-absorbing underlay or foam rubber backing.
- Floating hardwood: This type of flooring installation includes a gap between the subfloor and your actual floors, which effectively dampens sound.
- Fabric pendant lamps/floor lamps: Update your light shades with a textile shade, the thicker the better. Every textile in a space will help.

A combination of the techniques above, depending on your budget and skill level should help in the overall acoustics in your home. Below we have outlined a selection of fabrics from our range that offer great sound absorption qualities due to the high level of either wool content, thickness and/or construction.

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230 days ago

Top tips for avoiding mould in your home

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

We have a mould problem in our houses in Aotearoa.

Once you see mould, you need to deal with it quickly to make sure it doesn’t continue to grow and spread. It’s imperative to remove the growth of mould for the immediate health of your home, not to mention to stop the structural damage over … View more
We have a mould problem in our houses in Aotearoa.

Once you see mould, you need to deal with it quickly to make sure it doesn’t continue to grow and spread. It’s imperative to remove the growth of mould for the immediate health of your home, not to mention to stop the structural damage over time to your building materials.

Remove water sources:
Dry washing outside rather than inside.
Don’t use portable gas heaters indoors, they pump moisture into the air.
Deal with water leaks, clean up spills, and mop up condensation as it forms.
Install a vapour barrier under the house to stop moisture coming up from underneath.

Ventilate your rooms:
Use an extractor fan when cooking or showering
Open all the windows for 10 minutes a day to help remove the damp air that’s built up .
If you have a mechanical home ventilation system, make sure it’s on and well maintained.
Keep beds and furniture away from walls
Keep wardrobe doors slightly open.
Avoid putting mattresses directly on the floor.

Heat the place:
Warmer air holds more moisture so it’s harder for condensation to form.
Open curtains during the day to let warmth in and close them just before dark to keep the warmth in

Get in touch with us if you ever need some advice. Whether you own a house or rent, you should make these changes to prevent mould from forming.

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266 days ago

Cleaning Tips to Give Your Second-Hand Furniture New Life

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Whether it’s wood, cane, fabric or leather, give your second-hand finds a sparkling new lease of life with these cleaning tips and tricks.

Vintage furniture can sometimes need a little TLC before it’s displayed in your home, and pieces you’ve had for a while may also be ready for a spring … View more
Whether it’s wood, cane, fabric or leather, give your second-hand finds a sparkling new lease of life with these cleaning tips and tricks.

Vintage furniture can sometimes need a little TLC before it’s displayed in your home, and pieces you’ve had for a while may also be ready for a spring clean. A quick wipe-down or wash will suffice for some things, but how do you tackle those harder-to-clean items?

Cane:
Cane chairs, tables, shelves and bedheads, with their small crevices, can be dust magnets. Fortunately, you can remove dust with a feather duster, or a vacuum cleaner with a brush attachment, and use an old toothbrush for hard-to-reach areas. To get rid of dirt, most items can be wiped down with a damp cloth, and stains tackled with a soft-bristled brush dipped in a mix of gentle dishwashing liquid and warm water. Make sure not to leave your cane furniture wet after cleaning as mould can grow. Dry it with a fan or leave outside in the sun.

Wood:
Dust wooden furniture gently with a soft cloth, or damp cloth if needed. According to the Smithsonian’s Museum Conservation Institute, wooden furniture should be cleaned only when there is a build-up of wax or dirt, and only unfinished wood, painted wood, or wood with a sturdy finish should be cleaned. Oily dirt or waxy residue can be removed with diluted mineral turpentine or a mix of mild detergent and water but take care this doesn’t affect the wood or finish (do a spot test somewhere unobtrusive first).

The Smithsonian recommends avoiding polishes, oils and beeswax, and to instead buff with a stable, hard furniture polish, no more than twice a year for areas of heavy wear, and once every three or four years for other areas. Most other products will do more harm than good as they cause a build-up over time which can be hard to remove.

Fabric and leather:
You can dust fabric or suede surfaces using the brush attachment of your vacuum cleaner (on low suction), and wipe leather with a soft, damp cloth. Don’t forget to clean in between the folds and creases of couches and chairs.

From dishwashing liquid to vinegar and baking soda, there are a number of household products you can use to attempt to get out a stain, but it is best to research the correct method for each specific item and type of stain and do a test first to ensure the product you’re using won’t damage the fabric.

Always dab rather than rub at the fabric to ensure you don’t weaken it. You may need to repeat the process a number of times to fully remove a stain, and stubborn stains may need to be seen to by a professional.

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392 days ago

How Often Should You Clean Your Curtains?

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

The frequency of cleaning curtains largely depends on a few factors such as the material of the curtains, their location, and the level of dust and pollutants in the air. As a general rule, it is recommended to clean your curtains every 6-12 months. Here are some reasons why:

1. Dust and … View more
The frequency of cleaning curtains largely depends on a few factors such as the material of the curtains, their location, and the level of dust and pollutants in the air. As a general rule, it is recommended to clean your curtains every 6-12 months. Here are some reasons why:

1. Dust and allergens: Curtains can collect dust, dirt, and allergens over time. If you or anyone in your household suffers from allergies or asthma, it is especially important to clean your curtains regularly to prevent the accumulation of allergens that can trigger symptoms.
2. Stains and spills: Curtains can also become stained or soiled from spills, pet hair, or everyday use. Regular cleaning can help remove these stains and keep your curtains looking fresh and new.
3. Sun damage: Curtains can also become damaged over time from exposure to sunlight. Regular cleaning can help prevent sun damage and prolong the life of your curtains.
4. Odours: Curtains can also absorb odours from cooking, smoking, or pets. Regular cleaning can help eliminate these odours and keep your home smelling fresh.

However, curtains located in high-traffic areas, such as the living room or kitchen, may require more frequent cleaning, perhaps every three to six months. Curtains made of heavy fabrics, such as velvet or chenille, may also collect more dust and require more frequent cleaning.

In addition to regular cleaning, it is also recommended to vacuum your curtains regularly to remove dust and other particles. This can help to reduce the frequency of deep cleaning and extend the life of your curtains.

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398 days ago

The Benefits of Clean Curtains

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Curtains are an essential part of any home décor. They not only add beauty to a room but also serve practical purposes such as providing privacy, blocking light, and insulating the room. However, curtains can also become a haven for dust, dirt, and allergens, which can be harmful to your health. … View moreCurtains are an essential part of any home décor. They not only add beauty to a room but also serve practical purposes such as providing privacy, blocking light, and insulating the room. However, curtains can also become a haven for dust, dirt, and allergens, which can be harmful to your health. Regular cleaning of curtains can help remove these particles and keep your home healthy and clean.

Here are some reasons why cleaning curtains regularly is beneficial:

1. Remove Dust and Dirt: Curtains, like any other household item, collect dust and dirt over time. This can cause allergies, respiratory problems, and other health issues. Regular cleaning of curtains can help remove these particles and improve indoor air quality.
2. Improve the Look of Your Home: Clean curtains can improve the overall look of your home. They can add a fresh and inviting atmosphere to any room.
3. Prolong the Life of Curtains: Regular cleaning can help prolong the life of your curtains. Dirt and dust particles can cause the fabric to wear and tear faster than normal. Regular cleaning can prevent this and help extend the life of your curtains.
4. Remove Odours: Curtains can absorb odours from cooking, smoking, and other activities. Regular cleaning can help remove these odours and keep your home smelling fresh.
5. Protect from Sun Damage: Curtains can fade and become damaged over time from exposure to sunlight. Regular cleaning can help remove any build-up of dirt and dust particles that can contribute to sun damage.
6. Prevent Mould and Mildew Growth: Curtains that are not cleaned regularly can become a breeding ground for mould and mildew. Regular cleaning can prevent the growth of these harmful substances.

In conclusion, regular cleaning of curtains is important for both health and aesthetic reasons. It helps remove dust, dirt, and allergens, improves the look of your home, prolongs the life of your curtains, removes odours, protects from sun damage, and prevents mould and mildew growth. Therefore, it is recommended to add curtain cleaning to your regular cleaning routine to maintain a clean and healthy home.

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405 days ago

How to Look After Your Upholstery

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

In this blog we discuss the most common upholstery problems that can arise in use. We will break each problem down, looking at what it is, the likely cause and recommended remedies and solutions to avoid future re-occurrence.

CROCKING: What is it? Crocking is the term used to describe the … View more
In this blog we discuss the most common upholstery problems that can arise in use. We will break each problem down, looking at what it is, the likely cause and recommended remedies and solutions to avoid future re-occurrence.

CROCKING: What is it? Crocking is the term used to describe the transfer of excess dye from one surface to another due to rubbing and friction. The issue is increased by certain atmospheric conditions such as humidity and temperature.

Likely cause: In a situation where the dye is transferring out of the upholstery fabric (for instance a red fabric is turning pink) it will usually be a result of either poor quality dyes used during textile manufacturing or that the dyes were not set correctly during the dyeing and finishing process. Crocking can also occur when dye is transferred from an outside source onto the upholstery fabric, for instance a pair of new jeans can transfer blue dye on to your sofa giving it a grubby appearance.

Remedy: The key thing to establish with crocking is whether the discolouration is due to dye transferring out of your upholstery fabric or on to it from an external source. If it is transferring out of the fabric then it is important to check that some substance e.g. a solvent based product, has not come into contact with the fabric and affected the dyes. If all of the above can be ruled out then a genuine fabric issue may be the cause and the fabric will need to be replaced from another batch or alternative fabric.

FADING: What is it? Discolouration or lightening of the dye in a fabric due to exposure to ultraviolet light. Constant exposure to high levels of direct ultraviolet light can also result in fibre degradation, causing the fabric fibres to become brittle, which may result in areas of breakage.

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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413 days ago

Stop Your Curtains Getting Damp and Mouldy

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

It’s time to bid farewell to summer for another year and start facing the reality that soon it’s going to be cold and damp for a while. As we enter those colder months and condensation appears on the windows, we thought it was a good time to share some tips on preventing mould and mildew … View moreIt’s time to bid farewell to summer for another year and start facing the reality that soon it’s going to be cold and damp for a while. As we enter those colder months and condensation appears on the windows, we thought it was a good time to share some tips on preventing mould and mildew growing on your curtains.

What makes mould and mildew grow?
Interestingly, it’s not directly the condensation on your windows that causes mould and mildew because most curtains don’t come into contact with it. Mould and mildew grow when there’s moisture and warmth in the home, which condensation does contribute to.

Just like everything absorbent in your home, as temperatures go up the moisture in the air evaporates and is absorbed into the fabric. As they cool, the moisture changes back from its gaseous state to being closer to its liquid form. In absorbing this moisture they also take in any bacteria it holds. Repeated over time, this is what causes the nasty growths.

The difference between mould and mildew
Mould is a broad term that encompasses multiple identical nuclei and can grow beneath and penetrate the surface of affected material. Mildew is a type of mould that grows on the surface and can therefore be much more easily treated/removed. When it’s live, moulds are orangey or reddish in colour. The black patches we see are actually the hibernating mould spores waiting for the sun to warm them up and bring them back to life.

Where does all this moisture come from?
We live in a pretty humid climate in New Zealand at the best of times; in some areas it’s even greater. But it’s not all weather related. Cooking, showering, drying clothes, unflued gas heaters and simply breathing and existing all produce moisture content within our homes.

Preventing moisture build up and/or drying out your home
• Install a home ventilation system of some kind.
• Crack the windows a little during the day to allow a bit of cool air to flow through your home. North facing windows are best.
• Get a dehumidifier. Emptying this once a day (or more!) will really open your eyes to how much moisture is in your home. Remember the science though, you need to warm the air (and thus the moisture in it) before the dehumidifier can suck it in and remove it.
• Pop a DampRid moisture absorber container on the windowsill behind the curtains.
• Install a ShowerDome and extractor fan in the bathroom.
• Make sure your clothes dryer is vented to the outside.
• Install a rangehood in the kitchen and use lids on pots and pans.
• Change the curtain rail brackets to 80 or 100mm so the curtains are further from the walls and the windows allowing for more air circulation. Bear in mind however, this will likely lower their thermal insulating capabilities.
• Invest in double-glazing. Although this does not prevent mildew it can work to slow the onset.
• Minimise what mould growth feeds on. Clean soft furnishings regularly, clean windows and wipe down window surrounds with warm soapy water.
• Check plumbing for leaks.
• Maintaining an even inside temperature throughout the house helps stop moist air from condensing.
• Insulate well. Start with the ceilings and under floor as a priority, then the walls.
• Close curtains/blinds as soon as the sun goes down.

Don’t worry if it’s too late - Curtain Clean can treat and remove mould and mildew from your curtains. Call us on 0800 579 0501 or visit curtainclean.co.nz to find out more.

427 days ago

Why you DON’T put Curtains in a washing machine

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Recently we have been taking care of (fixing) curtains that have been put in the washing machine. There are a number of reasons why this is a terrible idea.

Firstly, we take many measures to ensure your curtains get as clean as possible without shrinkage or colour loss. Recently we have had to … View more
Recently we have been taking care of (fixing) curtains that have been put in the washing machine. There are a number of reasons why this is a terrible idea.

Firstly, we take many measures to ensure your curtains get as clean as possible without shrinkage or colour loss. Recently we have had to re-wash curtains that have been washed but there is still traces of mould or live mould left on the curtain. We take careful steps to ensure this is eliminated as much as possible on the curtain fabric, and can always remove it from linings. These results are simply unable to be duplicated in a home environment.

Spray on curtain cleaning products contain sodium hypochlorite, aka bleach. If you use products to remove mould, it can result in colour loss. This is one of the more common problems we have seen. We test all fabric before cleaning to be sure of what cleaners can be used with it.

Washing curtains in the washing machine can result in other damage – curtains need to be handled with care, especially older fabrics. It is expensive getting a curtain re-lined due to rips – we take extra care in preventing this from happening.

In addition to the above – most of the time, they will come out of the machine wrinkly and look terrible, no matter the fabric type. Our service ensures they look great and ‘like new’ as they can when returned to you (and of course, fresh and clean).

Don’t make the same mistake, call us (the experts) instead.

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418 days ago

That's a lot of hair!

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Pic of us surgically removing a cat from a curtain

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435 days ago

How to Fix a Carpet Dent from Heavy Furniture

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

It’s a moment of horror – moving a piece of furniture and realizing what it’s done to the carpet. In fact, some people even refuse to move their furniture around because they don’t know how to get rid of the carpet dents that the heavy pieces have left. Luckily, there is a fix!

The only … View more
It’s a moment of horror – moving a piece of furniture and realizing what it’s done to the carpet. In fact, some people even refuse to move their furniture around because they don’t know how to get rid of the carpet dents that the heavy pieces have left. Luckily, there is a fix!

The only things you’ll need are ice cubes, and a vacuum or hairbrush.
1. Place an ice cube on the dent. If the dent is large or long, use extra ice cubes as needed
2. Allow the ice cubes to melt.
3. Once the ice cubes have melted, the carpet will fluff back up.
4. After the area has dried, vacuum over the dents or gently use a hairbrush to further fluff the carpet if needed.

Additional Tips:
Moving furniture a few inches at regular intervals can help prevent carpet dents from becoming severe. Every couple months, scoot the couch or other heavy items a couple inches to one side and fluff up the dents. If this is done, the dent can often be fluffed simply with your fingers; no water necessary.

Scraping a coin over the dent can also work to fluff it up if your fingers alone aren’t getting the pile back up.

Another method of fluffing the carpet is to use a spray mister to slightly wet the dent, then use a hair dryer on warm or cool air (holding it several inches away from the carpet) to dry the area while gently fluffing up the pile with your fingers or a hairbrush.

Another method of fluffing the carpet is to use steam. Hold a clothing or upholstery steamer several inches above the carpet and quickly blast the dent with steam. Let the dent cool, then use your fingers or a hairbrush to fluff it up. However, most carpets are nylon, and nylon can melt easily, so it’s best to test the steam on a small hidden area first, such as in the corner of a closet, to see how the carpet fibres react to the heat. Again, be sure to hold the steamer several inches away from the carpet when applying the steam.

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455 days ago

The difference between Lined and Unlined curtains

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Curtains are an essential part of every home’s decor. And having the right curtains can be the last piece to the puzzle - the furnishing that makes the room, while having the wrong ones . . . well, no one wants to look at bad curtains.

When given an option, should the curtains be lined or … View more
Curtains are an essential part of every home’s decor. And having the right curtains can be the last piece to the puzzle - the furnishing that makes the room, while having the wrong ones . . . well, no one wants to look at bad curtains.

When given an option, should the curtains be lined or non-lined? What are the differences? We'll find out in this article.

Lined curtains, as the name would suggest, have a supplemental lining on the inside of the curtain. This lining can be multifunctional so it’s best to consider what you want to achieve with your curtains.

Sometimes the lining is simply for decoration, giving the curtain a bit of depth and extra weight, perhaps offering a splash of colour to offset the primary colour of the curtain.

More often than not, they are often designed to be noise cancelling, heat insulating, or fully light blocking, among other things. If for example, you’re planning your living room to also be a fully functional home entertainment centre, 100% blackout - lined curtains would be your best bet.

Lined curtains offer better privacy due to the extra thickness of the fabric. They often have extended lifetime compared to unlined curtains due solely to the lining preventing the fabric from fading.

Unlined curtains, on the other hand, have their own advantages.

They are both lighter and airier making them perfect for rooms that have either smaller or fewer windows and a tendency to remain dark.

They allow natural sunlight to fill the chosen area while still providing privacy to the homeowner. This has the added benefit of reducing the potential need for electrical light and thus ultimately reducing one’s electric bill.

Another perk is that unlined curtains cost less than lined curtains on average and so are a more affordable solution. The reduced amount of fabric used for unlined curtains also means that they attract less dust than lined curtains, which in turn creates fewer risks for those with allergies.

They are washing machine-friendly which is huge in itself. You will save both time and money avoiding dry cleaning.

Lastly, for those people who enjoy changing the appearance of the room frequently, unlined curtains are easier to hang or take down and store, and with their reduced costs, infinite combinations are possible.

Whether choosing lined or unlined curtains, the fact remains that curtains are the one element that pulls a room together. Both options have their pros and cons so homeowners must consider what purpose the curtains will be fulfilled before making their purchase.

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460 days ago

How to Clean a Burnt Pan — 5 Methods Tested

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

Ever wonder how to clean a burnt pan? See what happened when we put different cleaning methods to the test on our dirtiest skillets.

Whether you burn dinner completely or your pans get dirtier and dirtier over time, eventually you’ll need to have a scouring session at the sink. And for this, … View more
Ever wonder how to clean a burnt pan? See what happened when we put different cleaning methods to the test on our dirtiest skillets.

Whether you burn dinner completely or your pans get dirtier and dirtier over time, eventually you’ll need to have a scouring session at the sink. And for this, the quicker the better! For this reason, we put five methods for cleaning a burnt pan to the test. Keep reading to learn how to clean a burnt pan—and see what methods are most effective.

Is a burnt pan ruined?
In most cases, no! A burnt pan can be revived with our cleaning methods below. If all else fails, or if the pan has endured multiple years of heavy use and never seems to get clean, it may be time to part ways with it.

The Testing Method: In an effort to make sure this guide gives you the most accurate results, we put some parameters in place for this skillet scrubbing experiment. All pans tested were made of stainless steel and scorched with the same combination of foods—cheese, eggs and grape jelly.

If the method recommended soaking, we allowed each pan to soak for up to 15 minutes, checking at intervals of 5 minutes and documenting when the charred remains began to lift with ease. We also limited any extra “active scrubbing” to 10 minutes because honestly, who wants to scrub a pan for longer than that?!

Ratings: Each method is rated on a scale of 1 to 5. Ratings were awarded based on how long each technique took to work its magic, how much extra elbow grease was required to remove the burnt-on food and the overall effectiveness in the cleaning process in terms of how much mess remained on the skillet after cleaning within our set parameters.

Cleaning Techniques for Greasy Skillets: Warning: Before cleaning your pans, test the method on a small, inconspicuous portion to ensure it won’t damage the surface. The methods below are intended for stainless steel cookware and not those with non-stick coatings.

Tools and Supplies

Bar Keepers Friend: We tested Bar Keepers Friend for one of our cleaning methods and the results were impressive. It’s a household cleaning product everyone should have in their cupboard since it can be used on a variety of surfaces like stainless steel, ceramic and more. It’ll be your new cleaning best friend in no time.

Dishwashing gloves: Though all of our testing methods require less scrubbing, some scrubbing is necessary. Keep hands dry and clean with these versatile dishwashing gloves. We love that it features a non-drip catch cuff and that they can be used for washing dishes, cleaning the bathroom and everything in between.

Sponges: It’s always a good idea to have a stockpile of sponges on hand for everyday household cleaning. When it comes to cleaning kitchen appliances or cookware, opt for non-scratch sponges. They’re durable enough to get burnt food residue off, yet gentle enough that they won’t scratch or tarnish your best gear.

Method 1: Baking Soda + Vinegar

Benefits: This method uses affordable pantry items most people have on hand.

How It Works: Fill your dirty pan with equal part water and vinegar. Bring the mixture to a boil and then add 2 tablespoons of baking soda. Remove from heat and let soak for up to 15 minutes. Discard the liquid down your drain and then use a sponge or scouring pad to scrub away any remaining burnt-on bits. If spots remain, apply a paste made of baking soda mixed with a little water and let sit for a few minutes before scrubbing again.

What Happened: After just 5 minutes of soaking, we noticed some charred bits starting to float to the surface! However, we opted to let this one continue to soak for the full 15 minutes since it seemed some stubborn bits were holding fast. After rinsing and 10 minutes of heavy scrubbing with a scouring pad we were able to lift most of the charred, burnt-on food. A follow-up application of baking soda paste was definitely needed and further scrubbing was essential to lift the remaining debris. Rating: 3/5

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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505 days ago

How to Get an Extra-Clean House for Allergy Sufferers

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

If you live with someone allergic to dust mites, mould, pollen, pet hair or any one of the hundreds of allergens in household products, clean is not enough. A house needs to be extra-clean and allergen-proof to help make allergy sufferers as comfortable as possible. The alternative is sneezing, … View moreIf you live with someone allergic to dust mites, mould, pollen, pet hair or any one of the hundreds of allergens in household products, clean is not enough. A house needs to be extra-clean and allergen-proof to help make allergy sufferers as comfortable as possible. The alternative is sneezing, wheezing, coughing and watery eyes, all brought on by the presence of irritants that you can keep at bay with some extra attention.

Here’s how to get on top of some common irritants at your place:

1. Use allergy-friendly products
• Avoid using aerosol sprays as they are a common trigger for asthma sufferers. Even if you’re not standing near anyone, the high-pressure mist that the aerosol omits means the contents can spread a long way.
• Try to use environmentally-friendly products – what’s good for the environment is often better for us too.
• Avoid using products that contain harsh chemicals like ammonia, formaldehyde and sodium lauryl sulphate. Hunt out products that are free from these irritants or make your own natural cleaning products.

2. Keep a dust-free bedroom: It’s the dust mite droppings that many people react to (and news that there is dust mite poo in our bedding causes a reaction in the rest of us!). To keep bedding really clean, you will need to wash all bed linen regularly, preferably weekly. A man-made fibre like polyester is less likely to trap dust than natural fibres like cotton or linen.

Use a hypoallergenic mattress topper, duvet inner-cover and pillow protector and wash these at least monthly and replace them annually.

Keep stuffed animals to a minimum and wash those that remain regularly. Pull the bed out and vacuum underneath at least once a week, preferably daily. Don’t forget to dust side tables and vacuum underneath those as well.

3. Vacuum daily: Wooden or tiled floors are much easier to keep dust-free, but if you have carpet, a daily vacuum, especially in bedrooms, is a must. Use a vacuum cleaner made especially for allergy-sufferers – most will be fitted with HEPA filtration and powerhead.

Make sure you vacuum around the skirting boards and in crevices and vacuum around all beds at least twice. Empty canisters or vacuum bags regularly, sealing the bag well before disposal.

4. Use an air purifier: Even if you are taking the precautions outlined above, there will still be plenty of dust in your house – in fact some studies show that air pollution such as allergens and pollutants can be present in higher levels inside the home than outside! Air purifiers work to filter the allergens and pollutants from the air and improve the air quality.

5. Empty bins daily: The rubbish bin can omit toxins without you even realising, and they are a breeding ground for mould and germs. Empty bins every evening and disinfect with a hospital grade solution before lining with a plastic bag.

6. Beat doormats every day: Pollen and dust are tracked into our home constantly. Make sure you have a doormat on the outside and inside at every entry point to your home and shake these out regularly. Vacuum each indoor mat when you do your daily vacuum run. It’s a good idea to place a mat in the doorway of an allergy-sufferers bedroom for extra protection. Better yet, leave shoes outside.

7. Inspect for mould weekly: Mould is a common allergy trigger and its present absolutely everywhere. Don’t give it a chance to breed – wipe away small mould patches as soon as you find them with a paper towel and throw the paper towel in an outside bin. You can use a solution of three cups of water to five drops of Oil of Cloves (find it at your pharmacy) in a spray bottle to kill mould spores and prevent mould from growing.

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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517 days ago

A Beginners Guide to Curtain Tassels, Trims, Pelmets & Tiebacks

Owner from Curtain Clean BOP Ltd

It’s no secret that curtains can make or break a room. The colours, patterns and style are an essential part of trying a room together and creating a particular mood. However, there’s more to a perfect curtain than just the fabric and cut. As interior design trends move away from clean, … View moreIt’s no secret that curtains can make or break a room. The colours, patterns and style are an essential part of trying a room together and creating a particular mood. However, there’s more to a perfect curtain than just the fabric and cut. As interior design trends move away from clean, minimalistic Scandinavian styles - no curtain is complete without a tassel, trims, pelmet or tieback. In 2021, it’s all about more glamorous styles like Modern Luxe and Modern Classic. Feeling confused? Don’t worry, we’ve put together a beginner’s guide on all these finishing touches so you can make the right choice for your curtain style. Read on to find out more!

Tassels
Tassels are an elegant cluster of strings or cords that are clumped together at one end and hang free at the other. Suitable for curtains rather than blinds, these finishing features are actually a practical decoration. The tassel’s shape acts as a weight at the bottom of the cord which helps keep the curtains pulled back without the need for bulky knots. Tassel’s come in a variety of colours and styles to suit any decor. However, they are on the flashier end of curtain finishings, so they’d best suit a living room or bedroom.

Trims
So, you’ve selected a style of curtain that sounds your decor - now it’s time to choose a trim. Trims refers to the decorative elements that add a touch of ornateness to your curtains, and the sky’s the limit when it comes to style, pattern, colour and embellishments. Types of trim include:

Valances
You’ve heard of valances on beds, but when it comes to curtains and blinds a valance refers to the fabric or panel added above a window. Typically, valances are used to hide a rod or track and add a touch of chic to any room. The style options are endless - you can add embellishments like beads or pom-poms. However, avoid adding anything to the sides of your roller blinds, though, as this can become entangled in the roller blind mechanism at the top and prevent them from rolling and unrolling properly.

Keep reading: www.curtainclean.co.nz...

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