17 Alach Street
Gate Pa
Tauranga
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  • NZ's best professional curtain restorers

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  • Cleaning & Mould Removal

    We are industry specialists in removing mould and mildew from curtains, drapes & blinds.

    Services available

    Repairs, alterations and replacement parts for most window treatments

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12 days ago

Spare Parts for Blinds

Owner from Curtain Clean Bop Ltd

Are your vertical blinds looking a little worse for wear?

We stock replacement parts for all brands and sizes - hangers, weights, chains and more.

Weights: $1.00 each
Chain: $1.50 per metre
Hangers: .75c each

Come see us at 17 Alach Street, Greerton

19 days ago

Buy Better, Wear Longer, Dispose Smarter

Owner from Curtain Clean Bop Ltd

Fashion brands nowadays are becoming more eco-aware, and so are consumers. From production to disposal, fashion retailers and upscale designers alike are rethinking the effects their fabrics have on the environment. Even though we tend to see fashion’s ecological impact as a brand focused … View moreFashion brands nowadays are becoming more eco-aware, and so are consumers. From production to disposal, fashion retailers and upscale designers alike are rethinking the effects their fabrics have on the environment. Even though we tend to see fashion’s ecological impact as a brand focused problem, as consumers, we can play an important part in creating a path toward a sustainable, and more importantly a zero-waste future. It is as simple as changing our mind-set and being more mindful about the choices we make. All it takes is to gain a little more knowledge about the clothing we wear.
The textile industry draws significantly upon the ecosystem for the raw materials that create our fabrics, but some production processes tend to be more ‘unfriendly’ than others. The great news is that as major brands become increasingly eco-conscious, sustainability standards are also gaining traction across the industry. These standards support best practices and contribute to the emergence of organic or recycled fibre alternatives. As most of us understand the detrimental impacts that fibre production has on the environment, organic and preferred options which are more sustainably produced and far greener, are readily available.

Brands are making commitments. Big brands such as Kathmandu, H&M and Nike have pledged to achieve a 100 percent sustainable cotton production line by 2025 indicating increased accessibility to these garments. Organic and more sustainable counterparts from almost all types of natural fibres, including cotton, linen, down and wool, are becoming similarly available at retailers across the globe.
Amazing! ...

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25 days ago

Ordinary people who did something extraordinary

Owner from Curtain Clean Bop Ltd

Sufferage in Stiches

An outstanding exhibition honouring our whakapapa, history and the power of New Zealanders brought to you by Wellington Museum and Vinnies Re Sew.

Suffrage in Stitches is a unique exhibition, providing the opportunity for 546 individuals, families and groups to hang … View more
Sufferage in Stiches

An outstanding exhibition honouring our whakapapa, history and the power of New Zealanders brought to you by Wellington Museum and Vinnies Re Sew.

Suffrage in Stitches is a unique exhibition, providing the opportunity for 546 individuals, families and groups to hang their art in a gallery space regardless of their education, background or experience. The makers include a few leading figures from the art/recycling community however the majority of makers are ordinary people who come from diverse cultural/ethnic backgrounds, ages, generations and skills levels.

The 300 metre textile work remembers ordinary people in our history who did an extraordinary thing — signed a petition up and down the country so women could achieve the right to vote, as well as woman who’ve influenced the 546 makers.

It started as a collective exhibition and has emerged as a sharing of history, connection of people and an amazing feeling of togetherness.

The work matches the length of the original petition and consists of 546 individually designed fabric panels – the same number of pages in the original petition – and tells the stories of 546 women.

Makers have discovered a love of history and a renewed appreciation for those who went before them. They have made new friends, learnt new craft and recycling skills, and developed a deeper sense of belonging to New Zealand.

So many stories have surfaced – intrigue, poverty, hope, crime, resilience. On this website you’ll be able to explore unique stories of the women who signed the 1893 Suffrage Petition.
Exhibition open from December 2019 and runs through the to 27th of April 2020. 10am–5pm daily.

Wellington Museum - 3 Jervois Quay, Queens Wharf, Wellington

See the works here: www.suffrageinstitches.nz......

75 days ago

Art History: Ancient Practice of Textile Art and How It Continues to Reinvent Itself

Owner from Curtain Clean Bop Ltd

We come into contact with textile art every day. From the clothes we wear to the objects that decorate our home, it’s an art that can be simultaneously beautiful and useful. But it should come as no surprise that this field occupies these two categories. At the beginning of its long history, … View moreWe come into contact with textile art every day. From the clothes we wear to the objects that decorate our home, it’s an art that can be simultaneously beautiful and useful. But it should come as no surprise that this field occupies these two categories. At the beginning of its long history, textiles were seen as a utility rather than something that serves no discernible function aside from aesthetics. And while this is still the case today, visionary creatives have helped the art continually reinvent itself.


Textile art is one of the oldest forms of art in human civilization. At its inception, it was not focused on looks, but for practical purposes—such as clothing or blankets to keep warm. This dates all the way back to prehistoric times, and anthropologists estimate that this is between 100,000 to 500,000 years ago. These goods were made from animal skins, furs, leaves, and more.


As time wore on and the neolithic cultures settled, textiles become increasingly complex. Many early pieces were made with felting, which agitates animal fibers (like wool) to interlock them in a strong bond. Beyond that, though, humans also spun fibers to create strands of thread. They were woven together and resemble more of what we’re used to today.


Creating clothing and other textiles was laborious—everything had to be done by hand. This included gathering fibers from plants or animals and then twisting them to make it into yarn. In addition to being a tedious process, making an article of clothing was expensive; tailors and seamstresses altered garments to ensure that they lasted a long time. Depending on how wealthy someone was, they could get imported fabrics and colorful dyes. The Silk Road trade routes brought Chinese silk to India, Africa, and Europe. While clothing was still the dominant type of fiber art, the aristocracy could also afford to decorate the walls, floors, and furniture of their palaces in lush and vibrant pieces.

The Industrial Revolution was a turning point for textiles. With the invention of the cotton gin, spinning jenny, and power loom, creating fabric was now automated and could be produced on a massive scale. Textiles were not just for the wealthy anymore; as prices dropped, they were available to more of society. It also meant that these materials were not as precious, and creative people could experiment with them in previously unseen ways.

The rich history of textiles has laid the groundwork for contemporary creatives. In modern times, the terms fiber art or textile art generally describe textile-based objects that have no intended use. Although this realm has previously been seen as “women’s work,” artists—particularly female artists in the 1960s and 70s—started to reclaim the field and elevate it into high art.


Keep reading: mymodernmet.com...

82 days ago

White Chocolate & Macadamia Rocky Road

Owner from Curtain Clean Bop Ltd

Really delicious alternative to the classic version!


You'll need:

• 250g of pink and white marshmallows, halved
• 2 x 200g blocks of good-quality white chocolate, chopped
• 100g of dried cranberries or raspberries
• 110g packet of macadamias, roughly chopped
• 60g of … View more
Really delicious alternative to the classic version!


You'll need:

• 250g of pink and white marshmallows, halved
• 2 x 200g blocks of good-quality white chocolate, chopped
• 100g of dried cranberries or raspberries
• 110g packet of macadamias, roughly chopped
• 60g of pistachios, chopped in half
• 1/3 cup of desiccated coconut


• Grease a 20cm square cake pan. Line base and sides with baking paper, allowing a 2cm overhang on all sides.
• Combine marshmallows, cranberries, nuts and coconut in a bowl. Place chocolate in a microwave safe bowl. Microwave on medium-high for 1-2 minutes, stirring with a metal spoon every 30 seconds, or until smooth.
• Pour chocolate over marshmallow mixture. Mix well. Spoon mixture into prepared pan, pressing down with a spatula. Refrigerate for 2 hours or until set. Using a warm knife, cut into squares. Serve and enjoy!

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88 days ago

DIY Wall Christmas Tree

Owner from Curtain Clean Bop Ltd

If you already have all the decorations, but just need a tree, a DIY Wall Christmas tree could be the perfect solution. Great for people with no extra space for a tree, and ideal for homes with pets and small children as you can mount it up and out of the way!



You'll need:
- White … View more
If you already have all the decorations, but just need a tree, a DIY Wall Christmas tree could be the perfect solution. Great for people with no extra space for a tree, and ideal for homes with pets and small children as you can mount it up and out of the way!



You'll need:
- White Tinsel / Green Tinsel
- String of lights
- Decorations

- Mini command hooks
- Big bow or star for top


Start at the bottom and hang two hooks as wide as you like, placing them at approx. 15cm intervals until you have a triangle.

Starting at the top, wrap the tinsel around each hook, ensuring it is tight but not too tight that it could put a lot of pressure on the hooks. Once at to the bottom wrap the tinsel twice around the last ‘branch’ around the middle and tape it to stay put. Cut off any excess.

Next, wrap the lights in the same way. Ideally you want the plug end at the bottom. Started from the top, and follow the same process as the tinsel. When you get to the bottom, hang another hook upside down so the lights could wrap neatly around and not fall when unplugged.Place the bow or star at the top of the tree and adorn with a few simple decorations.

See the pictures for a couple of other simple but stunning ideas to match your decor.


If you decide to try this out, we would love to see your creation! Get in touch!

96 days ago

Christmas-in-a-Bottle!

Owner from Curtain Clean Bop Ltd

This is one of our favourites that we've seen online! Get the kids together to help you make a set of miniature winter wonderland ornaments for the Christmas day table or round the house.

You’ll need:
• A few small, clear jars (available at Spotlight)• White Deco sand (available at … View more
This is one of our favourites that we've seen online! Get the kids together to help you make a set of miniature winter wonderland ornaments for the Christmas day table or round the house.

You’ll need:
• A few small, clear jars (available at Spotlight)• White Deco sand (available at Spotlight) mixed with glitter, or without!
• Sprigs of Christmas tree branches or tinsel (which you can cut from an old tree, if you have one)
• Artificial moss (also available at Spotlight!)

• White Christmas figurines or old decorations (such as reindeer, Santa and elves)

Method:
• Cover the bottom of your base or bowl with moss.• Sprinkle some of the sand over the moss, so that it mixes together and looks like a snow-covered forest floor.
• Position a figurine—or multiple figurines if your vase is larger—on top of the moss and sand.
• Cut some of the bristles from the Christmas tree branches at the base, and dig a few into the moss and sand, so that they stand up.
• Place your Winters-in-a-bottle around your outdoor area and table.

103 days ago

Have a DIY white Christmas in your backyard!

Administrator from Curtain Clean Bop Ltd

Many kids (and adults!) in NZ dream of a white Christmas; they see it snowing on TV and wonder how the portly Santa can possibly deliver their presents while wearing all those wooly clothes!


While there’s nothing that we can do about the temperature, besides cranking up the fan, we have a … View more
Many kids (and adults!) in NZ dream of a white Christmas; they see it snowing on TV and wonder how the portly Santa can possibly deliver their presents while wearing all those wooly clothes!


While there’s nothing that we can do about the temperature, besides cranking up the fan, we have a few DIY ideas about how you can add a touch of Christmas magic to your backyard.


• False Snow
It may never snow here in NZ, when the kids awaken on Christmas day, you can certainly make it look like it has! Make your own easy, false snow with only shaving cream and baking soda.

Simply:
• Empty 2 boxes of baking soda into a bowl,
• Mix a complete 500 ml can of shaving foam, and thoroughly stir.

You could also add white glitter to give the snow some of that early-morning sparkle. If you want more, just adjust the ingredient levels.

Keep the snow in the fridge until you want to use it. That way, when you give it to the kids to make mini-snowmen and snowballs in the backyard, it’ll be cold—just like the real thing! Homemade snow is completely safe and washable with water, so sprinkle some around your trampoline for some extra excitement on Christmas day.

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122 days ago

PINK - A Colourful History

Administrator from Curtain Clean Bop Ltd

In the West, pink first became fashionable in the mid-1700s, when European aristocrats -- both men and women -- wore faint, powdery variants as a symbol of luxury and class. Madame de Pompadour, the chief mistress of Louis XV, loved the color so much that, in 1757, French porcelain manufacturer … View moreIn the West, pink first became fashionable in the mid-1700s, when European aristocrats -- both men and women -- wore faint, powdery variants as a symbol of luxury and class. Madame de Pompadour, the chief mistress of Louis XV, loved the color so much that, in 1757, French porcelain manufacturer Sèvres named its exquisite new shade of pink, Rose Pompadour, after her.


Pink was not then considered a "girls" color -- infants of both sexes were dressed in white. The tint was, in fact, often considered more appropriate for little boys because it was seen as a paler shade or red, which had "masculine," military undertones.

The more recent association with women and femininity started around the mid-19th century, when "men in the Western world increasingly wore dark, sober colors," leaving brighter and pastel options to their female counterparts.


Keep reading: edition.cnn.com...

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130 days ago

GREEN - A Colourful History

Administrator from Curtain Clean Bop Ltd

You may be planning to wear green this St. Patrick’s Day. Green, the color of kissing the Irish! The color of money! The color of… horrible, horrible death.

At least when it came to green dyes through the Victorian age.
In 1814, a company in Schweinfurt, Germany, called the Wilhelm Dye and … View more
You may be planning to wear green this St. Patrick’s Day. Green, the color of kissing the Irish! The color of money! The color of… horrible, horrible death.

At least when it came to green dyes through the Victorian age.
In 1814, a company in Schweinfurt, Germany, called the Wilhelm Dye and White Lead Company developed a new green dye. It was brighter than most traditional green dyes. It was bolder. The shade was so jewel-like that it quickly began being called "emerald green." And women loved it. Largely because it was during this time that gas lighting, rather than candlelight, was being introduced. When women went out to parties at night, the rooms were considerably brighter than they had been only a few decades before. These party-goers wanted to make sure they were wearing gowns that stood out boldly — gowns in a shade like emerald green. People also began using it for wallpaper and carpeting. Victorian Britain was said to be "bathed in… green."

Unfortunately, the reason that dye was so striking is that it was made with arsenic...The effects of arsenic exposure are horrific. In addition to being deadly, it produces ulcers all over the skin. Those who come in close contact with it might develop scabs and sores wherever it touched. It can also make your hair fall out, and can cause people to vomit blood before shutting down their livers and kidneys.


So, this is probably one of the worst chemicals for a society to be "bathed in." This was obviously unpleasant for women who wore green apparel.
Keep reading: www.racked.com...

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138 days ago

Made by Greerton Engineering

Administrator from Curtain Clean Bop Ltd

Awesome Trestles made by Peter at Greerton Egineering.
Great in those short spaces. Guys love them. Saves them so much back breaking work.

143 days ago

PINK - A Colourful History

Owner from Curtain Clean Bop Ltd

Pink has always been a spectacular contradiction. It’s simultaneously fresh-faced and sophisticated, alien (a 17th-century Chinese word for pink meant “foreign color”) and internal, and at home in both high and low culture. In Japan, it serves as wistful symbol of the slain samurai; in Korea,… View morePink has always been a spectacular contradiction. It’s simultaneously fresh-faced and sophisticated, alien (a 17th-century Chinese word for pink meant “foreign color”) and internal, and at home in both high and low culture. In Japan, it serves as wistful symbol of the slain samurai; in Korea, it’s interpreted as a sign of trustworthiness.


In the West, pink has shifted from one extreme to the next over the last three centuries. Eighteenth-century fashion helped to popularize the shade, which was a favorite of the pastel-loving European bourgeoisie. Pink received a fuchsia facelift during the 1960s Pop Art movement and a neon-soaked ’90s revival, before settling down as the pale, “post-gender” center of every millennial moodboard. From Renaissance portraits to rose gold iPhones, here’s a brief history of pink in art—and beyond.



Pink rarely appears in nature, which may explain why the color only entered the English language as a noun at the end of the 17th century. But in other languages, the shade remains difficult to pin down. Pink’s cultural significance can also vary widely between countries. In contemporary Japanese culture, pink is perceived as a masculine and mournful color that represents 'young warriors who fall in battle while in the full bloom of life.' In Germany, pink is “rosa”—a hue that’s 'bright, soft, peaceful, sweet, and harmless.'


The diversity of pink hues is the result of adding or subtracting yellow and blue tones from a wide spectrum of colors.


Keep reading: www.artsy.net...

152 days ago

BLUE - A Colourful History

Administrator from Curtain Clean Bop Ltd

The color blue is associated with two of Earth’s greatest natural features: the sky and the ocean. But that wasn’t always the case. Some scientists believe that the earliest humans were actually colorblind and could only recognize black, white, red, and only later yellow and green. As a result,… View moreThe color blue is associated with two of Earth’s greatest natural features: the sky and the ocean. But that wasn’t always the case. Some scientists believe that the earliest humans were actually colorblind and could only recognize black, white, red, and only later yellow and green. As a result, early humans with no concept of the color blue simply had no words to describe it. This is even reflected in ancient literature, such as Homer’s Odyssey, that describes the ocean as a “wine-red sea.”


Blue was first produced by the ancient Egyptians who figured out how to create a permanent pigment that they used for decorative arts. The color blue continued to evolve for the next 6,000 years, and certain pigments were even used by the world’s master artists to create some of the most famous works of art. Today it continues to evolve, with the latest shade discovered less than a decade ago. Read on to learn more about the color’s fascinating history.


There’s a long list of things we can thank the ancient Egyptians for inventing, and one of them is the color blue. Considered to be the first ever synthetically produced color pigment, Egyptian blue (also known as cuprorivaite) was created around 2,200 B.C. It was made from ground limestone mixed with sand and a copper-containing mineral, such as azurite or malachite, which was then heated between 1470 and 1650°F. The result was an opaque blue glass which then had to be crushed and combined with thickening agents such as egg whites to create a long-lasting paint or glaze.



Read more: mymodernmet.com...

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165 days ago

PURPLE - A Colourful History

Owner from Curtain Clean Bop Ltd

It’s safe to say that you can expect to pay the same price for the same fabric, regardless of the colour. But only a few generations ago, the cost depended on the colour of the cloth because some dyes were so expensive to obtain.


Purple was so expensive that only royalty could afford it!

View more
It’s safe to say that you can expect to pay the same price for the same fabric, regardless of the colour. But only a few generations ago, the cost depended on the colour of the cloth because some dyes were so expensive to obtain.


Purple was so expensive that only royalty could afford it!

Tyrian Purple, otherwise known Royal Purple or Imperial Purple, dyes fabric a beautiful deep purple shade. In ancient times, the dyestuffs were obtained from the Mediterranean sea snail. The purple is used by the snail as part of predatory and defensive behaviour – the secretion can be extracting by poking and antagonizing the snail, and the resulting goo would gradually become purple on exposure to sunlight. ‘Milking the snail’ was a renewable resource, but so labour-intensive that usually the snails were crushed completely to extract the colour. Mountains of snail shells have been found at the ancient sites of Sidon and Tyre – they were harvested to such extremes that for a long time, the Murex snail was considered extinct.


Keep reading: www.charlesparsonsinteriors.com...

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171 days ago

YELLOW - A Colourful History

Administrator from Curtain Clean Bop Ltd

When writing to his sister in 1888, Vincent van Gogh wrote, “The sun, a light that for lack of a better word I can only call yellow, bright sulfur yellow, pale lemon gold. How beautiful yellow is!”

Yellow holds an unusual place in history. It has been held in the highest regard as a symbol … View more
When writing to his sister in 1888, Vincent van Gogh wrote, “The sun, a light that for lack of a better word I can only call yellow, bright sulfur yellow, pale lemon gold. How beautiful yellow is!”

Yellow holds an unusual place in history. It has been held in the highest regard as a symbol of the powerful sun and rich gold, but has also been considered the colour of outcasts and vagrants.


Yellow was one of the first colours to be used in art – cave paintings depicted in yellow have been found in caves in Europe dating back to approximately 25,000 years old. The pigment came from the earth – a coloured clay called ochre that could be yellow or red. Yellow ochre contains hydrated iron hydroxide, with a distinct gold colour.

The Egyptians and Romans loved yellow, using it to represent much-prized gold in their art. The Egyptians used a yellow mineral called orpiment in tomb paintings, not knowing the arsenic compound was highly toxic.
Keep reading: www.charlesparsonsinteriors.com...

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