38 days ago

Books Wanted!

Community Activator from Red Cross - Waikato Service Centre

We are currently in search of book donations for our Annual Bookfair!

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More messages from your neighbours
1 day ago

im over it

Paul from Pukete

in an article recently printed in the media
Māori economist Matt Roskruge says the Māori economy is critical to the country's economic recovery.
The Māori economy, a superstar of the Aotearoa economy, is activated to a fraction of its potential and central to our economic recovery. A vibrant Māori economy contributes to Māori wellbeing while also strengthening the Aotearoa economy. To build on these strengths, our recovery should look at capital deepening and technology adoption to get the most out of our resources and efforts. 

Closely related is enabling greater autonomy and governance over our economic affairs. It is remarkable given the consistent failure of the state to find solutions to economic hardship experienced by whānau that there is such resistance to shifting economic autonomy to Māori governance bodies.There are still major challenges to address."   

Minister of Justice Andrew Little supported claims by protesters that New Zealand’s justice system is racist: “When well over half of the men in our prisons are Maori, when nearly two-thirds of women in our prisons are Maori, that tells you there is something wrong with the system.” 

Sorry no there is a cultural disconnect between the elite and the grassroots in Maoridom 

Dr Muriel Newman states in a article entitled Dangerous Agendas 
""In 2019, ‘Maori’ offenders were responsible for 39 percent of homicides, almost 66 percent of robberies, 56 percent of burglaries, 55 percent of thefts, 48 percent of acts causing injury, 48 percent of property damage, and 46 percent of weapons offences, even though they represent only 16 percent of the population.

If protesters were rational in their demands to reduce the number of Maori in prison, instead of blaming institutional racism or the Police they would address the real cause of criminal offending, which was clearly outlined by US President Barack Obama in a Fathers’ Day speech in 2008:

“Of all the rocks upon which we build our lives, we are reminded today that family is the most important. And we are called to recognize and honour how critical every father is to that foundation. They are teachers and coaches. They are mentors and role models. They are examples of success and the men who constantly push us toward it.

“But if we are honest with ourselves, we’ll admit that what too many fathers also are is missing — missing from too many lives and too many homes. They have abandoned their responsibilities, acting like boys instead of men. And the foundations of our families are weaker because of it. 

“You and I know how true this is in the African-American community. We know that more than half of all black children live in single-parent households, a number that has doubled — doubled — since we were children. We know the statistics —that children who grow up without a father are five times more likely to live in poverty and commit crime; nine times more likely to drop out of schools and 20 times more likely to end up in prison. They are more likely to have behavioural problems, or run away from home or become teenage parents themselves. And the foundations of our community are weaker because of it.”

It’s the same story here in New Zealand. The rise in the breakdown of the family – especially the Maori family - has been catastrophic. It is and always has been the root cause of social deprivation, violence, and crime. Reducing sole parenthood and intergenerational welfare dependency is at the heart of the solution."      

Institutional racism is a manufactured excuse for the the failure of indigenous groups  to be held accountable for their own inaction and apathy in resolving their issues within their own culture
Specific to New Zealand 
"consistent failure of the state to find solutions to economic hardship experienced by whānau"  stop playing the victim card "   
Any society that retains a 50 billion dollar asset base while their grassroots remain in poverty only need to look to themselves as their elite stifle and strangle their opportunism
Are we not judged as a nation and or a culture by the way we treat those less advantaged amongst us 
the irony is many claim a right to "Tino Rangatiratanga"  (self-determination) 
as usual i am open to your thoughts

2 days ago

How affordable is travel within NZ?

Lorna Thornber Reporter from Stuff Travel

Hi everyone, I'm Lorna, a Stuff travel reporter. We're doing a story on how affordable travel within NZ is. For those of you who have travelled within the country post-lockdown, we'd like to hear whether you've been able to find suitable flights, accommodation and activities within your budget. Do you think accommodation providers and tourism operators are doing enough to entice New Zealanders to explore their backyard? Please let us know in the comments below, your message may be used in our story.

12 hours ago

What do you think of this approach to a book on depression?

Libby Wilson Reporter from Hamilton Press

How We Got Happy profiles 20 young Kiwis who have experienced depression, but focuses on how they keep themselves well.

The coffee table book was created by Waikato friends Eve Macfarlane and Jonathan Nabbs, who share their own stories in it.

Read more here. What do you think of this approach to a book on depression?

If you'd like one, you can buy it here. Proceeds go to the Mental Health Foundation of NZ.

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